• Like
Civil Rights in the USA: Introduction
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

Civil Rights in the USA: Introduction

  • 114 views
Published

The incomplete introduction to an History 12 presentation

The incomplete introduction to an History 12 presentation

Published in Education
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
114
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Brown vs Board: Class action suit that was supported by the US Supreme Court by application of the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment
  • KKK membership: 1920=4 million, 1924=6million, 1930= 30,000 (after rape and murder by leader), 1970=2,000, and 2000=3000. At peak, 15% of total US pop.
  • A lynching doesn’t have to be a hanging - the first ones were under the British: tar and feathers. Most recently, in the 1990s in Texas, a black man was dragged from a car for 3 miles until dead.
  • 1931, Scottsboro, Alabama: 2 white women traveling in a train car accused the 9 of raping them - boys aged 13-19. Later, one of the women admitted they had made up the story. The Communist Party helped with the legal defense of the accused and gained international exposure. It seemed clear the boys were railroaded (pun).
  • 1931, Scottsboro, Alabama: 2 white women traveling in a train car accused the 9 of raping them - boys aged 13-19. Later, one of the women admitted they had made up the story. The Communist Party helped with the legal defense of the accused and gained international exposure. It seemed clear the boys were railroaded (pun).

Transcript

  • 1. In Brief 1) Emancipation but no freedom: 1863 1947 2) The Battles: 1948-1965 3) Winning the War: 1964 & 1965 4) New Battles: Watts and Rodney King
  • 2. Emancipation but no freedom • Lincoln’s Emancipation proclamation 1863 during the Civil War. • Amendments to slavery, citizenship and discrimination. • All men are still not equal - especially in the South.
  • 3. Jim Crow Laws 1876 - 1965 “separate but equal” = the segregation laws: – Public schools – Public spaces (ex. washrooms, fountains, lunch counters) – Public transportation (ex. buses) Brown Vs Board of Education of Topeka (Kansas) 1954 Civil Rights Act 1964
  • 4. Desegregation • US Military desegregated 1948 under Truman (Marines, 1954). • 1954 Supreme Court ruling for deseg. of schools (Brown Vs. Board of Educ Topeka, Kansas) • Soon other public spaces included: parks, beaches, air/rail terminals, etc • De Jure and De Facto not the same – much resistance in the SOUTH.
  • 5. • First KKK started 1865 at end of War in Tennessee soon every Southern state. • Social club jokes/hazing turned to Reign of Terror vs Republicans, black and white and their post-war Reconstruction. • Second KKK started 1915 with remarkable growth (20-40% of adult males in some states). • Lynching, harassment, intimidation Ku Klux Klan
  • 6. Leo Frank murdered by vigilante lynch mob, 1915 A Jewish factory owner, convicted of the murder of a Catholic woman, Mary Phagan. When his sentence was commuted to life, a mob stormed the jail and lynched him. This was the start of KKK2. Of the ≈ 5000 US lynchings in the last century, 75% of the victims were black.
  • 7. During the 1950s and 60s, the KKK was a key force opposing desegregation • The Klan had the tacit (sometimes direct) approval of police, municipal and state authorities. • Klan criminals often were not charged, convicted or given firm sentences because their politics were mirrored by those in power.
  • 8. Minorities on the other hand… Scottsboro Boys / Scottsboro 9
  • 9. Minorities on the other hand… Scottsboro Boys / Scottsboro 9
  • 10. JFK • A Catholic president • Talked the talk, but let down the African American minority in terms of action.
  • 11. The Great Society Kennedy’s Civil Rights Bill passed by Congress – allows Feds to cut-off funding to those who discriminated.