Relinquishing Control: Creating Space for Open Innovation

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frog Creative Director Thomas Sutton spoke on the main stage at the Lift conference in Geneva, Switzerland on February 2. His presentation is about cultivating empty spaces for open innovation to understand what people need and want from their products.

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Relinquishing Control: Creating Space for Open Innovation

  1. 1. relinquishing control:creating space for open innovation thomas.sutton@frogdesign.com
  2. 2. Design is the conscious and intuitive e ort to impose meaningful order - Victor Papanekso how can it be open?
  3. 3. 1. what is innovation?2. open delivery3. open experiences4. open design5. putting it back together
  4. 4. 1. a situational model for innovation Photo: Jan Chipchase
  5. 5. *a “situation” is a network of people andthings, animated by flows of information, energy, material, and behavior.
  6. 6. *a “situation” is a network of people andthings, animated by flows of information, energy, material, and behavior. “innovation” is the process by which new things are added to a situation, modifying both the structure of the network and it’s flows
  7. 7. 2. open delivery: the delivery tree Carl Fredrik Hill [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
  8. 8. Digital Touchpoints (Web sites, applications, games, etc ) Physical Touchpoints (Phones, Computers, Cars, etc) Platforms(OS’s, Cloud Computers, Logistics, etc) Utilities and Infrastructure (Telco Networks, Roads, etc) Standards and Policy (W3C, IEC, IEEE, etc)
  9. 9. Digital Touchpoints (Web sites, applications, etc ) Physical Touchpoints (Phones, Computers, Cars, etc) Platforms (OS’s, Cloud Computers, Logistics, etc) Utilities and Infrastructure (Telco Networks, Roads, etc) Standards and Policy (W3C, IEC, IEEE, etc)Content and Service (media, healthcare, travel, banking, etc)
  10. 10. User (composed) Experience (selective, opportunistic, open) Digital Touchpoints (Browsers, Web sites, Mobile apps, etc ) Physical Touchpoints (Phones, Computers, Cars, etc) Platforms (OS’s, Cloud Computers, Logistics, etc) Utilities and Infrastructure (Telco Networks, Roads, etc) Standards and Policy (W3C, IEC, IEEE, etc)Content and Service (media, healthcare, travel, banking, etc)
  11. 11. Many of todays platform players originated asmere digital touchpoints. Their migration toplatform status was fueled by openness.
  12. 12. 3rd Party Applications Example: Mobile OS What’s more important: Device Manufacturers the best product, or the best (most open) delivery tree?
  13. 13. 3. open experiences: multichannel ecosystemskindly lent by Gianluca Brugnoli (http://twitter.com/lowresolution)
  14. 14. The digital world. Today. Social network This is still a PC Tablet a twitter client mobile app There is still a search engine Mobile and pervasive, multichannel and multiscreen, application based. The main starting point is a social network, relevant content is found following social connections or a location.
  15. 15. Multiple screens and devices livetogetherUsers access data, content and services with thebest screen available in that situation
  16. 16. Example: shopping experience The multichannel shopping User Experience flows on a service platform made of di erent channels and touchpoints. 1. LANDING AND 2. PRODUCT 3. PRODUCT 4. SHOPPING CART 5. ORDER SET UP 6. CRM AND PROMOTION DISCOVERY PRESENTATION MANAGEMENT CHECK OUT SUPPORTWebsiteeMailMobileStoreCall CenterPaper
  17. 17. Example: shopping experience End users build their own experience across the platform, jumping from a channel to another, connecting the available touchpoints. 1. LANDING AND 2. PRODUCT 3. PRODUCT 4. SHOPPING CART 5. ORDER SET UP 6. CRM AND PROMOTION DISCOVERY PRESENTATION MANAGEMENT CHECK OUT SUPPORTWebsiteeMailMobileStoreCall CenterPaper
  18. 18. Example: Albert Heijn - Appie shopping assistant.From the web to the grocery store through a mobile app
  19. 19. Design considerationsMany entry points are possibleIn the system there are many entry points where the user can initiatethe interaction, following context, situation and other needs and goals.There is no one best wayInteraction and task flow doesn’t always follow one single optimalprocess, but is the combination of various partial and occasional actionsaccomplished by the user with di erent tools in di erent context.Design for connectionsIn the system scenario, design is mainly focused on finding theconnections with the whole network, than in creating closed and self-su cient systems, tools and services.Connections are social and cultural assets, other than technical.
  20. 20. 4. open design:user-guided design processes
  21. 21. Immersive Research recognises that objectivity is futile user research slide 3 Photos: Jan Chipchase
  22. 22. web-based open innovation makes global reach (almost) free http://frogmob.frogdesign.com © 2010 frog design. All rights reserved
  23. 23. participatory design: open and playful dialogue with users
  24. 24. and users are doing it for themselves www.ponoko.com
  25. 25. 5. putting it back together photo: Einsamer Schütze CC BY-SA 3.0
  26. 26. Innovation Potential
  27. 27. The social The technological situation situation Innovation PotentialPeople: Abu badali, CC-BY-SA-2.5 Gears: eugrafia CC-BY-SA-3.0, via Wikimedia Commons via Wikimedia Commons
  28. 28. Open Delivery Don’t build anything more than you have to. Let others build on top of your product.The social The technological situation situation
  29. 29. Open Use Let users build their own ideal path. Design for connectionsThe social The technological situation situation
  30. 30. Open Design Design with users. Or let them design for themselves.The social The technological situation situation
  31. 31. Thanks / Mercithomas.sutton@frogdesign.com

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