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MINISTRY of AGRICULTURE
Participatory Agriculture and Climate Transformation Programme(PACT)
Launching Workshop
February 23, 2024
Hawassa
Presentation Outline
1) Background
▪ Lesson learned
▪ Participatory design process
▪ Geographic Area of Intervention
2) Theory of change
3) Selected commodities
4) Key Approaches and Targeting Strategy
5) Programme Goal and Objective
6) Programme Components
7) Partnership
8) Planning and Budgeting
9) Financers and their share
10) Fiduciary Responsibilities
11) Reporting Flow and Feedback
Lesson Learned(PASIDP-II)
PASIDP-II PerformanceOverview
Overview
Once, 1.9
Three Times,
36.0
Twice, 62.2
Once
Three Times
Twice
❑ Irrigation frequency per year
❑ Crop yield increased as a result of the interventions;
about 94.8 percent of irrigation user HHs and 80.6
percent of Rainfed-only user HHS reported that their
produce had increased.
78.7%
79.1%
80.2%
85.4%
90.5%
IM PR OVED IR R IGATIO N WATER
M ANAGEM ENT
IM PR OVED SOIL FER TILITY
M ANAGEM ENT
IM PROVED ACCESS TO INPUTS
IM PR OVED AC C ESS TO IR R IGATION
WATER
IM PR OVED C R OP M ANAGEM ENT
PR AC TIC ES
PERCEN OF CASES
REASONS
FOR
YIELD
INCREAMENT
Farmers' Reason for increment of yield from irrigated agriculture
Production and productivity
❑ Develop high-value crops; during the study year, 74.7
percent of the farmers had grown market-oriented
crops.
Dry Season wheat production with irrigation and technology adaptation
Wheat production Agamwuha
Wheat cluster at wagur scheme
Wheat Harvesting at Bereda Lencha
The net income of irrigated farmers was about 17,426,245
Ethiopian birr annually, this means a single irrigated
farmer had an average annual net income of 65,266 birr
(47,691 from crop sale, 16,899 from livestock, and 676
birr from other sources).
Seasons had a different impact in terms of net income.
The highest net income was obtained from the first season
about 48 percent, then from the second season about 32
percent, and the lowest income was collected from the
third season which is only 20 percent of the total income.
In terms of source of income, 73 percent from crop sales,
26 percent from livestock and livestock produce sales, and
1 percent from other sources contributed to the total net
income of farmers.
Hence giving due attention based on the contribution of
income sources is vital to improving the net income of
farmers.
Items of farm income
Income from items
sold last year in
Birr
Input cost on fertilizers,
labour, seed, chemicals,
transportation and others in
Birr
Net income (Gross
income–input cost)
Contribution to
Net Income in
percent
Vegetables 8,608,601.00 1,990,674.00 6,617,927.00 51.97
Fruits 950,475.00 238,496.00 711,979.00 5.59
Pulses 3,534,850.00 748,109.50 2,786,740.50 21.88
Cereals 3,356,608.00 775,790.00 2,580,818.00 20.27
Oil crops 42,900.00 6,730.00 36,170.00 0.28
Total 16,493,434.00 3,759,799.50 12,733,634.50 100.00
Items of farm income Income in Birr
Cost in birr (inputs,
labour, and others)
Net income (Gross income–input
cost)
Livestock product 1,141,794.00 385,479.00 756,315.00
Sale of livestock 4,210,000.00 746,254.00 3,463,746.00
Trade of livestock (including
Fattening)
390,500.00 98,500.00 292,000.00
Total 5,742,294.00 1,230,233.00 4,512,061.00
Items of farm income Income in Birr
Cost in birr (inputs,
labour and others)
Net income (Gross income–input
cost)
Rented out agricultural
land
171,000.00 36,000.00 135,000.00
Rented out Farm
machinery
10,000.00 4,500.00 5,500.00
Agricultural wages 56,300.00 16,250.00 40,050.00
Total 237,300.00 56,750.00 180,550.00
summary of all season income from livestock from the sample HHs
summary of all season income from other sources from the sample HHs
summary of all season income from crops from the sample HHs
Farm Income
FoodandNutrition Dietary gap assessment
•Lack of vitamin A, B12, D, C, Ca
Nutrient dense crop
selection
•OFSP, Avocado, quality protein
maize…
Crop development
•Improved seed provision
and demo
•Technical support
Food demonstration
•Identification of recipes
•Cooking demonstration
Scale up
•Field day
•Workshops
•Document sharing
Meal intake
▪ More than 3 meals per day 4.5%;
▪ 3 meals per day 90.7%;
▪ Two meals per day 4.8%
Number of people provided with
targeted support to improve
their nutrition.
18,784 HHs
Food and Nutrition
Women Empowerment (GMF)
GMF Beneficiaries in Oromia region Koruha SSIP
Effects attributed to GMF by respondents
• Increased inclusion of women in farming
tasks, farming decision-making, decisions
over benefits from farming (income, food)
• Responsibilities are shared and decided
together
• Lower levels of conflict, more love and
respect in and out of the house
• Lower violence to women various kinds
(psychological, verbal, and physical)
• GMF training treats couples as equals,
which changes how couples view each
other. Limited previous opportunities to
work as equals.
• Recognition and sharing of the women’s
work burden by men – source of many
conflicts
• Lead to deeper emotional connection
between husband and wife (listening, love,
respect)
Family, friends, and non-GMF neighbors
notice the positive changes
• Collaboration and responsibility-
sharing
– “…GMF influenced (the trained) couple to
better listen to each other, decide things
together, and work more equally together
for their common goals. We learned from
GMF HH and got experience.”
• Better income/productivity
• Less conflict/domestic violence
– “There is a positive impact because GMF
educated us to solve the problem in
peaceful ways as well as we solve our
conflict and problem through indigenous
democratic ways.”
• More love and respect:
– “[After GMF training’] We enjoy peace,
love, and stability in our home. Because of
there is cooperative work. That means we
help each other to work things together.. ]
Results – Family level Results – Community level
Youth nursery: Azuari 2 wshd, Amhara (left) and Damine lemen wshd,Oromia (right)
Y
outhEng
ag
ement
Job Creation
On and off-farm full-time equivalent jobs
created 16,041
Case of Agam Wuha in Amhara region
• Through the sale of various fruit seedlings,
earn about 350,000 birr.
• They have also entered into petty trade.
• Out of the 10 youths, five of them have
purchased sheep, while two female
members have owned houses in a nearby
town
Case of Melka in Oromia region
• Able to accumulate savings of 96,400 birr from
the sale of avocado seedlings.
• Additionally, they currently have five beehives
that starting to produce approximately 12 kg of
honey per hive,
• They have raised 25,000 different fruit plants
that are ready for sale.
Groups Participants
Produced Vermin
compost (Qt)
from selling of
worm & compost
Income (Birr)
5 49(23F) 1,944 647,900
Case of Oromia region VC
Youth Engagement…
No. of
youth
group
Number of members
Income gained
(birr)
Male Female Total
8 31 1 32 2,729,712.00
Manual Tube Drilling (Amhara region)
Key Outputs and Its’ Indicators
Project
Life
Target
Accomplishment
Since the start of to
the programme
Accomplishment Since the
start of to the programme in %
Outreach: - Number of persons
receiving services promoted or
supported by the project
108,750
107,388
98.75
Output 1.1 Selection of irrigation
schemes for investment
● Number of households that have
access to irrigation schemes. 46,250 37,629 81.36
● Area under feasibility studies
approved.
22,260 23,214 104.29
● Number of IWUAs established. 150 115 76.67
Output 1.2 Irrigation schemes
developed or upgraded
● Hectares of farmland under water-
related infrastructure
constructed/rehabilitated.
18,400 16,305 88.61
Output 2.1 Improved access to
appropriate inputs, access to
agricultural and financial services
for smallholder producers
● Number of rural producers'
organizations supported.
150 178 118.67
● Number of functional cooperatives
that provide input and output
services to clients.
100 65 65.00
● Number of persons in rural areas
trained in financial literacy and/or
use of financial products and
services.
50,000 49,166 98.33
Key Outputs and Its’ Indicators
Project Life
Target
Accomplishment
Since the start of to
the programme
Accomplishment Since
the start of to the
programme in %
● Number of persons in rural areas
trained in financial literacy and/or
use of financial products and
services.
50,000 49,166 98.33
● Number of persons trained in
income-generating activities or
business management
15,000 10,251 68.34
● Number of rural producers
accessing production inputs and/or
technological packages.
14,250 15,049 105.61
Output 2.2 Improved productivity
in intervention areas.
● Number of individuals engaged
in NRM and climate risk
management activities (ASAP).
83,750 83,225 99.37
● Number of households supported
with increased water availability
or efficiency (ASAP).
46250 37,629 81.36
● Number of people provided with
targeted support to improve their
nutrition
22,103 18,784 84.98
Output 2.3 Improved and
sustainable watershed
management.
● Extent of land with rehabilitated
or restored ecosystem services.
● Land under climate-resilient
practices (ASAP).
73,600 71,633 97.33
● Number of micro- watershed
management plans developed.
150 117 78.00
Key Outreach and Output Indicators
Participatory Design Process for
Programme
Geographic Area of Intervention
❑ Intervention regions
a) Afar
b) Amhara;
c) Oromia;
d) Southern Nations,
e) Central Ethiopia,
f) Sidama;
g) South West Ethiopia (SWE),
h) Somali, and
i) Tigray
Regions and Selection Criteria
❑ The regions have been selected based on:
I. High rural population,
II. High poverty prevalence,
III. High rate of food and nutrition insecurity,
IV. Presence of economic opportunities/markets relevant
to the project;
V. impacts of climate change and natural resources
degradation; and
VI. Relative security.
Geographic Area of Intervention….
✓ High poverty prevalence, based on inclusion in
the productive safety net program (PSNP)
✓ High climate vulnerability
✓ High vulnerability to other factors (food security,
poverty, gender inequality, water, education,
agriculture);
✓ The level of degradation of the productive
natural resource base (particularly soil, water
and trees);
✓ Minimized overlap with kebeles under PASDIP II;
Number of Woreda and Selection Criteria
✓ No overlap with LLRP supported;
✓ Proximity to private sector providers of goods
and services; and
✓ Synergies WFP fresh food voucher
programme in amhara.
✓ The number of woredas are distributed in
proportion to the population.
The target woredas allow for linkages with RUFIP
III and complementarities with PASIDP II areas.
❑ A total of 90 food-insecure woredas have been prioritized based on:
Region
#
Woredas
Target HHs Total Members
Amhara 20 33,333 166,667
Central
Ethiopia
6 10,000 50,000
Oromia 32 53,333 266,667
Sidama 4 6,667 33,333
Somali 9 15,000 75,000
South Ethiopia 7 11,667 58,333
South West
Ethiopia 3 5,000 25,000
Afar 3 5,000 25,000
Tigray 6 10,000 50,000
Total 90 150,000 750,000
Geographic Area of Intervention…
1 Community Engagement
Representatives of local communities
played a pivotal role in identifying
key challenges of the rural
communities of the intervention
areas.
2 Regional level Participation
Regional officials and experts
participated in developing of concept
concept note of the programme by
by consulting the respective
communities.
3 Federal level Participation
The federal officials and technical team from all respective
departments
departments
in and out of the Ministry of Agriculture actively
participated in facilitating discussion in regions and
consolidating
consolidating
the
the
final concept note of the program.
Participatory Design Process
PACT launching workshop presentation-Final.pdf
Selected Value Chain Commodities
❖ Cereals (Wheat)
❖ Fruits (Avocado, Banana)
❖ Vegetables(Onion, Tomato
and Head Cabbage)
❖ Livestock (Poultry, Forage,
Cattle fattening and Shoat)
10 in 10 National Programmes
− Wheat(Bread & Durum)
− Green Legacy (Avocado, Banana,
Bamboo)
− Vegetables(Onion, Tomato)
− Red meat (Cattle fattening and
Shoat)
− Poultry (Egg and Chicken Meat)
Key Approaches and Targeting Strategy
➢ Climate-smart landscape development,
➢ Inclusive community empowerment,
➢ Community-led,
➢ Market-oriented production and
➢ Nutrition sensitive
Key Approaches
Targeting Strategy
1
2
3
Geographic targeting, based on the
identification of priority districts
Self-targeting, of poor households
Direct targeting of the specific groups
The targeting strategy will also include: the
selection of enterprises that have
a
b
Potential for inclusion of poor
households, women, and youth
Potential positive impacts on nutrition
and climate change adaptation
Availability of natural resources for
production
Availability of markets
b
d
c
The primary target group
1
• Poor households with land holding less than
2ha of cultivable land with limited livestock,);
2 • Pastoralists
3
• Agropastoral engaged in less diversified
traditional livelihood systems
4
• PWD in rural areas, 5% (7,500) PWD who are
economically active
5
• Rural underemployed and unemployed
youths owning no or small land, 40% (60,000)
female and male youth between 18-34 years
6 • Female-headed households, 50% (75,000)
Programme Goal and Objective
The program aims to decrease poverty and enhance rural resilience through
sustainable development and resilience enhancement, fostering inclusive and
equitable development
The PDO aims to empower 150,000 rural HHs in selected kebeles to
improve their incomes, food and nutrition security, and resilience to external
shocks
The program, spanning seven years, aims to support livelihoods, promote
entrepreneurship, and develop infrastructure in target communities through
various activities (June 2023 to December 2030)
The program focuses on inclusivity in rural HHs, ensuring all community
members benefit from interventions, improving well-being, resilience, and
quality of life, contributing to poverty reduction and sustainable development.
Strategic Focus
• The program aligns with the country's strategic
frameworks,
✓ promoting gender equality and women's
empowerment,
✓ aiming to create jobs for young people,
including those with disabilities.
• The program supports community-led initiatives,
sustainable use of natural resources, and improved
agricultural productivity.
• It aligns with
✓ The National Rural Development Policy,
✓ National Agricultural Investment Plan,
✓ Agriculture Sector Ten-Year Plan,
✓ Nationally Determined Contribution and Climate
Resilient Green Economy strategy,
✓ Climate Smart Agriculture and National Adaptation
Plan,
✓ Digital Ethiopia Strategy and Ten-Year Development
Plan, and
✓ Ethiopia Food System Transformation Roadmap.
• It complements the government's efforts to
implement the momentum from the 2021 Food
System Summit and achieve food system
transformation objectives.
The intervention are expected to contribute ;
a) Improve resilience to market and environmental shocks,
b) Create green jobs and entrepreneurship for rural youths and
women, including for those living with a disability;
c) Economic empowerment, increased voice and participation in
decision-making bodies, and more equitable workload for
women;
d) Increased access to improved dietary choices and nutritious
foods,
Programme Outcomes
1 Outcome 1
Enhanced sustainable and equitable
access to natural resources and
increased agricultural productivity.
2 Outcome 2
Increased access to remunerative
markets of targeted value chains.
3 Outcome 3
Institutions and policy capacity strengthened.
Programme Outputs
1.1 Community-led climate resilient and natural resources management
3
1.2
1.2
1.3
2.1
1.1
2.2
3.1
3.2
Climate resilient infrastructure developed
Climate Market-Oriented and Nutrition-sensitive Climate-resilient
Food Production and Productivity improved
Market Access and Business to Business linkages established
Access to Financial Services for Producers and Agribusinesses
improved
Policy support & engagement in PACT-related focused areas
strengthened
Institutions strengthened
Programme Components
Community-Led
Climate-Smart
Productive
Landscapes
Agribusiness
Development
Institutional and
Policy
Strengthening &
Implementation
Support Services
Components and key Focus Area
The Component will support:
a) Community-led equitable access & and adaptive sustainable use & and
management of natural resources;
b) Market-led & climate-adapted pastoral & smallholder production &
productivity enhancement of target commodities;
c) Development of inclusive and equitable water and market infrastructure; &
d) Improved nutrition.
Component 1: Community-Led Climate-Smart Productive Landscapes
Components and key Focus Area….
a) Community sensitization and organizing
Landscape Coordination Committee (LCC).
b) Assessment and prioritization of landscapes
based on their degradation status and climate
vulnerability
c) Community-led preparation of landscape
development and investment plans (LDIPs)
i. integrated natural resources management,
ii. water infrastructure for households, crops,
and livestock,
iii. crop and livestock production enhancement
and
iv. Market access improvement,
Subcomponent 1.1 Community-led Climate Resilient Development and Natural
Resource Management (NRM)
d) Implementation of NRM and soil health
improvement measures
i. Soil and water conservation measures
ii. Pasture land management
iii. Establishment of National Soil Testing
Facility
iv. Compensation of smallholder farmers for
Carbon farming
v. Promotion of improved cookstoves
vi. Biogas systems for cooking and lighting
vii. Job Creation through landscape
management activities
Components and key Focus Area….
i. Development of improved farmer-led small-scale irrigation systems
▪ Identification of Potential Schemes and Prefeasibility Rapid Assessment
ii.Development of Multiple-Use Water Systems (MUS)
▪ Identification of Potential MUS Sites and Prefeasibility Rapid
Assessment;
▪ Feasibility Studies;
▪ MUS Detailed Design and Works Supervision;
▪ Quality assurance of Feasibility and Design Studies;
iii.Rehabilitation of existing water Infrastructure
▪ Site identification and Feasibility Studies;
▪ Schemes Detailed Design and Rehabilitation Works Supervision
▪ Quality assurance of Feasibility and Design Studies.
Sub-component 1.2: Climate Resilient Infrastructure Development:
Components and key Focus Area….
a) Support to digital agriculture extension;
▪ Production of Video materials on ARM and other extension messaging
for farmer training under FTCs;
▪ Disability inclusion expert to review the digital modules content and
training materials & provide expert guidance during training;
▪ Promotion and Awareness for the Digital Platform through
Cooperatives/FTCs and Agribusiness;
b) Capacity building of extension staff
c) Support to farmers
i. Support the FBS/FFS with inputs for demonstration of enterprises on
the farm groups;
ii.Demonstration support for rain-fed agriculture at FTC
d) Nutrition SBCC design TA and roll-out implementation support (mass
media, community influencer training, M&E)
Subcomponent 1.3: Market-Oriented, Nutrition-sensitive and Climate-
Resilient Food Production and Productivity
Components and key Focus Area….
a) Inclusive digital value chain
assessment and partner business
companies’ identification;
• Digital data collection of base market
information to feed into the market
platform;
• Digital Mapping;
Subcomponent 2.1: Market Access Linkage Support
b) Capacity building of experts
• Business facilitation skill training to ATI,
BoA, and Cooperative Promotion Office
Staff;
c) Develop the Capacity of Cooperatives and Unions to Graduate to Professional
Business Organizations
• Cooperative Graduation Training Package Trainers ToT.
Component 2: Agribusiness Development
Components and key Focus Area…
Subcomponent 2.2: Tailored Business and Finance Linkage to Young men and
women Agripreneurs
Tailored training for different types of agri-businesses to
enhance entrepreneurial attitude and business management
skills;
Business plan development support;
Seed capital;
Skill-based training depending on demand
Mentorship; and
Engagement in policy dialogue.
Components and key Focus Area….
Component 3: Institutional and Policy Strengthening and
Implementation Support Services
Subcomponent 3.1: Institutional Strengthening and Policy
Support
Subcomponent 3.2: Programme Coordination and
Implementation Support Services
Partnership
Area of collaboration
▪ Carbon market
▪ Knowledge generation and
capacity development
▪ Digital service
▪ Mechanization services
Partnership...
Partner
Fund
source
Potential areas of collaboration
Development
Bank of
Ethiopia
(DBE)
IGREENFI
N 2
• IGREENFIN will provide loan for
climate adaptation and resilience
interventions under component 1 of
PACT
Ethiopian
Associations
of Persons
with
Disabilities
(EAPD)
GTM and
IFAD
• PACT will liaise with FEAPD and
its affiliates at regional, zonal, and
Woreda levels during disability
inclusion mainstreaming
FAO EU-funded
• Food safety frameworks and
training materials development for
the cooperatives
• Study to identify marketable
pathways for biofortified crops and
benefit from early-generation seeds
• Dissemination and systematization
of CSA practices and technologies
• support to (young) agripreneurs
Partner
Fund
source
Potential areas of collaboration
Vita
VITA,
IFAD, and
community
• Energy saving/carbon trading
Acorn/Rabobank ASAP • Agroforestry/Carbon trading.
Lersha IFAD
• Provision of mechanization services
• Leverage gender-responsive services, and explore
disability inclusion to facilitate access to inputs
and mechanization services
• Digital extension services
JICA
IFAD and
JICA
• SHEP approach
• NSA model villages in Amhara and Oromia
regions
CD4RM/PARM IFAD • DRR technical support, a platform for DRR
ATI IFAD
Grant
• Extension services, market linkages, and e-
vouchers.
• Digital platform that supports productivity market
access and arm-related information dissemination.
• Business-to-business relationships building in
their initiatives in the different commodity clusters
Planning Process
Consultation with the
community and
identification of issues to
be addressed
Review and consolidation
by Woreda technical team
Approval by Woreda
steering committee
Review and consolidation
by Regional PCMU and
technical team
Approval by Regional
steering committee
Review and consolidation
by Federal PCMU and
technical team
Approval by National
steering committee
Implementation
Planning and Budgeting
Programme Budget Summary USD (’000)
Component and subcomponent IFAD grant
ASAP+_1
grant
ASAP+_2
grant
GTM EU IGREENFIN TBC GOV
Private
sector
Beneficiaries Total
1) Community-led climate-smart
productive landscapes 61,256.59 6,951.00 3,524.64 5,010.73 17,333.45 35,012.56 - 17,376.77 1,711.68 10,269.41 158,446.83
1.1 Community-led climate
resilient development and natural
resource management
4,529.68 - 3,524.64 3,709.53 - 13,473.50 - 2,583.65 - 3,898.33 31,719.32
1.2 Climate resilient infrastructure
development 51,550.68 - - - 17,333.45 21,000.00 - 13,870.67 1,711.68 6,364.84 111,831.32
1.3 Market-oriented production
and productivity improvement of
selected food commodities
5,176.22 6,951.00 - 1,301.20 - 539.06 - 922.45 - 6.25 14,896.19
2) Inclusive and equitable market
access 7,609.95 - - - - - 2,011.22 327.60 1,952.60 - 11,901.37
2.1 Market access linkage support
6,993.13 - - - - - - 314.47 1,475.00
-
8,782.61
2.2 Support to women and men
agripreneurs 616.82 - - - - - 2,011.22 13.13 477.60
-
3,118.76
3) Institutional and policy
strengthening and implementation
support services 9,337.20 - - - 507.29 - - 473.55 - - 10,318.04
3.1 Institutional strengthening and
policy support 321.92 - - - - - - 8.47 -
-
330.39
3.2 Programme coordination and
implementation support services 9,015.28 - - - 507.29 - - 465.08 -
-
9,987.65
Grand Total 78,203.73 6,951.00 3,524.64 5,010.73 17,840.75 35,012.56 2,011.22 18,177.92 3,664.28 10,269.41 180,666.24
Financers and their share
Financer Area of Contribution Share(%)
IFAD All area of the intervention
43.3
ASAP+_1
production and productivity
improvement of selected food
commodities 3.8
ASAP+_2 Infrastructure and Climate finances
2.0
GTM
digital technology, women’s
membership in rural institutions
including FBS, Cooperatives,
scaling up of gender transformative 2.8
EU Infrastructure and Climate finances
9.9
Financer Area of Contribution Share(%)
IGREENFIN
Sustainable utilization of water and
other natural resources as well as
emission reductions and
sequestration of greenhouse gases 19.4
TBC (FAO)
Support to women and men
agripreneurs 1.1
GOV
Contribution in the form of tax and
investment cost 10.1
Private
sector
business-to-business linkage
(storage and market shed) 2.0
Beneficiaries
Contribution in cash, labour and
material 5.7
Fiduciary responsibilities
▪ IFAD-funded projects constitute a substantial
proportion typically exceeding 85%;
✓ Effective procurement management,
▪ Section 7.05 of the General Conditions
provides that procurement financed by IFAD
shall be carried out by the provisions of :
✓ The Borrower/Recipient's procurement regulations, to the
extent such are consistent with the IFAD Procurement
Guidelines;
✓ The project-specific Procurement Arrangements,
▪ The Project Procurement Arrangements (PAL)
govern the execution of project procurement
operations concerning the acquisition of
goods, works, and services under the
Agreement;
Eligible Expenditures and mis-procurement
✓The expenditure shall meet the reasonable cost of
goods, works, and services required for the Project
and be covered by the relevant AWPB and
Procurement Plan and procured in conformity with
the Fund's Procurement Guidelines, and the
provisions of the Project Procurement
Arrangements as further defined in article II,
section 2.0.
Mis-procurement
• IFAD will not finance expenditures for goods,
works, or services that have not been procured by
these Guidelines and the financing agreement. This
also constitutes Advance Contracting and
Retroactive Financing.
Procurement and financial management
Summary of Budget by Region
# of PACT Woreda 90 Total Budget (USD)
S.N Region
Formula
Share (%) PACT Regions
Formula
Share (%)
Share Within the
PACT
Share from
90 Woredas PACT Regions
Share of the
Region
Budget Share
(USD)'000
180,666.24
1 Tigray 6.03 Tigray 6.03 6.33 6 Federal 8.50 15,356.63
2 Afar 3.02 Afar 3.02 3.17 3 Afar 2.90 5,244.07
3 Amhara 21.60 Amhara 21.60 22.69 20 Amhara 20.76 37,507.22
4 Oromiya 34.46 Oromiya 34.46 36.20 32 Central Ethiopia 5.67 10,251.97
5 Somale 9.98 Somale 9.98 10.48 9 Oromia 33.12 59,837.91
6 Ben. Gumz 1.83 SNNP 12.90 13.55 13 Sidama 3.94 7,123.66
7 SNNP 12.90 Sidama 4.10 4.31 4 Somale 9.59 17,329.73
8 Sidama 4.10 South west 3.11 3.26 3 South Ethiopia 6.73 12,151.81
9 South west 3.11 95.20 100.00 90 South West Ethiopia 2.98 5,392.47
10 Gambela 1.33 Tigray 5.80 10,470.77
11 Hareri 0.76 100.00 180,666.24
12 Dire dawa 0.88
-
Procurement…
Procurement Systems (in-use)
▪ OPEN (Online end-to-end Procurement System)
▪ NOTUS(No Objection Tracking Utility System) for No Objection,
▪ CMT (Online contract monitoring tool) in IFAD Client Portal (ICP)
Interim Financial Reporting (IFR)
▪ This is required both for reporting and disbursement
▪ It must be submitted under frequency and submission deadlines (on or before 30
days after the quarter ends)
Fund Disbursement
Based on FA Section (E) Article (3) (e)
➢For disbursement of funds to the regions
and woredas, the Memorandums of
Understanding (MoUs) by and between the
Federal Government and participating
regions, and between regions and woredas
have been entered into.
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)
➢MoU will be signed between
▪ MoA with the regional BoA;
▪ The regional BoA with Zone and woreda agriculture
office.
▪ The MoU will outline the roles, responsibilities, and
expectations of each party, as well as the commitment
to collaborate and support the successful
implementation of the project.
▪ The MoU will serve as a formal agreement to foster
cooperation, coordination, and shared accountability.
Reporting Flow and Feedback
The reports systematically provide actual
results using the indicators designed in the
planning phase. Results-based reports are
used to demonstrate accountability to
governing bodies. In writing the results
report should:
• Describe what was achieved and list the
indicators of success;
• Compare actual results with expected results;
• Quantify achievement whenever possible
against a baseline;
• Illuminate findings with quotes, testimonials,
photos, etc;
• Explain the reasons for over or under-
achievement;
• Highlight any unforeseen problems or
opportunities that may require new strategies
or a redesign of the initiative;
• Tell the story of how the results were
achieved, and highlight when there is
potential for wider learning of lessons;
• Recognize the involvement of others
(partners or/and stakeholders) and assign a
degree of attribution, if possible;
• Ensure there is sufficient data to describe
the effects of activities undertaken.
Zone coordinators
RPCMU
FPCMU
Kebele coordinators
Woreda coordinators
Flow
of
Feedback
Flow
of
reports
IWUA/WUA
Watershed
committee
Cooperatives
Landscape
committee
Produce an effective results-based
report. An effective report can also
highlight challenges, areas of
inefficiency, and poor results. Quality
criteria for result reporting include the
following six areas:
• Completeness;
• Balance (good and bad);
• Consistency (between
sections);
• Substantiveness and reliability;
• Clarity, and
• Timeliness
ከማምረት በላይ Beyond Production
መገናኛ አካባቢ
ፖ. ሳ. ቁ 62347 አዲስ አበባ ኢትዮጵያ
ስልክ፡ +25111646137 ፣ ፋክስ፡ +251116462311 ፣ ነፃ የስልክ መስመር፡ 888
ፌስቡክ፡ Ministry of Agriculture-Ethiopia
ቲውተር ፡
www.moa.gov.et
Megenagna Area
P O Box 62347 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Tel፡ +25111646137 ፣ Fax፡ +251116462311
Face book፡ Ministry of Agriculture-Ethiopia
twitter፡
www.moa.gov.et
Thank You!!

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PACT launching workshop presentation-Final.pdf

  • 1. MINISTRY of AGRICULTURE Participatory Agriculture and Climate Transformation Programme(PACT) Launching Workshop February 23, 2024 Hawassa
  • 2. Presentation Outline 1) Background ▪ Lesson learned ▪ Participatory design process ▪ Geographic Area of Intervention 2) Theory of change 3) Selected commodities 4) Key Approaches and Targeting Strategy 5) Programme Goal and Objective 6) Programme Components 7) Partnership 8) Planning and Budgeting 9) Financers and their share 10) Fiduciary Responsibilities 11) Reporting Flow and Feedback
  • 4. PASIDP-II PerformanceOverview Overview Once, 1.9 Three Times, 36.0 Twice, 62.2 Once Three Times Twice ❑ Irrigation frequency per year ❑ Crop yield increased as a result of the interventions; about 94.8 percent of irrigation user HHs and 80.6 percent of Rainfed-only user HHS reported that their produce had increased. 78.7% 79.1% 80.2% 85.4% 90.5% IM PR OVED IR R IGATIO N WATER M ANAGEM ENT IM PR OVED SOIL FER TILITY M ANAGEM ENT IM PROVED ACCESS TO INPUTS IM PR OVED AC C ESS TO IR R IGATION WATER IM PR OVED C R OP M ANAGEM ENT PR AC TIC ES PERCEN OF CASES REASONS FOR YIELD INCREAMENT Farmers' Reason for increment of yield from irrigated agriculture Production and productivity ❑ Develop high-value crops; during the study year, 74.7 percent of the farmers had grown market-oriented crops.
  • 5. Dry Season wheat production with irrigation and technology adaptation Wheat production Agamwuha Wheat cluster at wagur scheme Wheat Harvesting at Bereda Lencha
  • 6. The net income of irrigated farmers was about 17,426,245 Ethiopian birr annually, this means a single irrigated farmer had an average annual net income of 65,266 birr (47,691 from crop sale, 16,899 from livestock, and 676 birr from other sources). Seasons had a different impact in terms of net income. The highest net income was obtained from the first season about 48 percent, then from the second season about 32 percent, and the lowest income was collected from the third season which is only 20 percent of the total income. In terms of source of income, 73 percent from crop sales, 26 percent from livestock and livestock produce sales, and 1 percent from other sources contributed to the total net income of farmers. Hence giving due attention based on the contribution of income sources is vital to improving the net income of farmers. Items of farm income Income from items sold last year in Birr Input cost on fertilizers, labour, seed, chemicals, transportation and others in Birr Net income (Gross income–input cost) Contribution to Net Income in percent Vegetables 8,608,601.00 1,990,674.00 6,617,927.00 51.97 Fruits 950,475.00 238,496.00 711,979.00 5.59 Pulses 3,534,850.00 748,109.50 2,786,740.50 21.88 Cereals 3,356,608.00 775,790.00 2,580,818.00 20.27 Oil crops 42,900.00 6,730.00 36,170.00 0.28 Total 16,493,434.00 3,759,799.50 12,733,634.50 100.00 Items of farm income Income in Birr Cost in birr (inputs, labour, and others) Net income (Gross income–input cost) Livestock product 1,141,794.00 385,479.00 756,315.00 Sale of livestock 4,210,000.00 746,254.00 3,463,746.00 Trade of livestock (including Fattening) 390,500.00 98,500.00 292,000.00 Total 5,742,294.00 1,230,233.00 4,512,061.00 Items of farm income Income in Birr Cost in birr (inputs, labour and others) Net income (Gross income–input cost) Rented out agricultural land 171,000.00 36,000.00 135,000.00 Rented out Farm machinery 10,000.00 4,500.00 5,500.00 Agricultural wages 56,300.00 16,250.00 40,050.00 Total 237,300.00 56,750.00 180,550.00 summary of all season income from livestock from the sample HHs summary of all season income from other sources from the sample HHs summary of all season income from crops from the sample HHs Farm Income
  • 7. FoodandNutrition Dietary gap assessment •Lack of vitamin A, B12, D, C, Ca Nutrient dense crop selection •OFSP, Avocado, quality protein maize… Crop development •Improved seed provision and demo •Technical support Food demonstration •Identification of recipes •Cooking demonstration Scale up •Field day •Workshops •Document sharing Meal intake ▪ More than 3 meals per day 4.5%; ▪ 3 meals per day 90.7%; ▪ Two meals per day 4.8% Number of people provided with targeted support to improve their nutrition. 18,784 HHs
  • 9. Women Empowerment (GMF) GMF Beneficiaries in Oromia region Koruha SSIP Effects attributed to GMF by respondents • Increased inclusion of women in farming tasks, farming decision-making, decisions over benefits from farming (income, food) • Responsibilities are shared and decided together • Lower levels of conflict, more love and respect in and out of the house • Lower violence to women various kinds (psychological, verbal, and physical) • GMF training treats couples as equals, which changes how couples view each other. Limited previous opportunities to work as equals. • Recognition and sharing of the women’s work burden by men – source of many conflicts • Lead to deeper emotional connection between husband and wife (listening, love, respect) Family, friends, and non-GMF neighbors notice the positive changes • Collaboration and responsibility- sharing – “…GMF influenced (the trained) couple to better listen to each other, decide things together, and work more equally together for their common goals. We learned from GMF HH and got experience.” • Better income/productivity • Less conflict/domestic violence – “There is a positive impact because GMF educated us to solve the problem in peaceful ways as well as we solve our conflict and problem through indigenous democratic ways.” • More love and respect: – “[After GMF training’] We enjoy peace, love, and stability in our home. Because of there is cooperative work. That means we help each other to work things together.. ] Results – Family level Results – Community level
  • 10. Youth nursery: Azuari 2 wshd, Amhara (left) and Damine lemen wshd,Oromia (right) Y outhEng ag ement Job Creation On and off-farm full-time equivalent jobs created 16,041 Case of Agam Wuha in Amhara region • Through the sale of various fruit seedlings, earn about 350,000 birr. • They have also entered into petty trade. • Out of the 10 youths, five of them have purchased sheep, while two female members have owned houses in a nearby town Case of Melka in Oromia region • Able to accumulate savings of 96,400 birr from the sale of avocado seedlings. • Additionally, they currently have five beehives that starting to produce approximately 12 kg of honey per hive, • They have raised 25,000 different fruit plants that are ready for sale. Groups Participants Produced Vermin compost (Qt) from selling of worm & compost Income (Birr) 5 49(23F) 1,944 647,900 Case of Oromia region VC
  • 11. Youth Engagement… No. of youth group Number of members Income gained (birr) Male Female Total 8 31 1 32 2,729,712.00 Manual Tube Drilling (Amhara region)
  • 12. Key Outputs and Its’ Indicators Project Life Target Accomplishment Since the start of to the programme Accomplishment Since the start of to the programme in % Outreach: - Number of persons receiving services promoted or supported by the project 108,750 107,388 98.75 Output 1.1 Selection of irrigation schemes for investment ● Number of households that have access to irrigation schemes. 46,250 37,629 81.36 ● Area under feasibility studies approved. 22,260 23,214 104.29 ● Number of IWUAs established. 150 115 76.67 Output 1.2 Irrigation schemes developed or upgraded ● Hectares of farmland under water- related infrastructure constructed/rehabilitated. 18,400 16,305 88.61 Output 2.1 Improved access to appropriate inputs, access to agricultural and financial services for smallholder producers ● Number of rural producers' organizations supported. 150 178 118.67 ● Number of functional cooperatives that provide input and output services to clients. 100 65 65.00 ● Number of persons in rural areas trained in financial literacy and/or use of financial products and services. 50,000 49,166 98.33 Key Outputs and Its’ Indicators Project Life Target Accomplishment Since the start of to the programme Accomplishment Since the start of to the programme in % ● Number of persons in rural areas trained in financial literacy and/or use of financial products and services. 50,000 49,166 98.33 ● Number of persons trained in income-generating activities or business management 15,000 10,251 68.34 ● Number of rural producers accessing production inputs and/or technological packages. 14,250 15,049 105.61 Output 2.2 Improved productivity in intervention areas. ● Number of individuals engaged in NRM and climate risk management activities (ASAP). 83,750 83,225 99.37 ● Number of households supported with increased water availability or efficiency (ASAP). 46250 37,629 81.36 ● Number of people provided with targeted support to improve their nutrition 22,103 18,784 84.98 Output 2.3 Improved and sustainable watershed management. ● Extent of land with rehabilitated or restored ecosystem services. ● Land under climate-resilient practices (ASAP). 73,600 71,633 97.33 ● Number of micro- watershed management plans developed. 150 117 78.00 Key Outreach and Output Indicators
  • 14. Geographic Area of Intervention ❑ Intervention regions a) Afar b) Amhara; c) Oromia; d) Southern Nations, e) Central Ethiopia, f) Sidama; g) South West Ethiopia (SWE), h) Somali, and i) Tigray Regions and Selection Criteria ❑ The regions have been selected based on: I. High rural population, II. High poverty prevalence, III. High rate of food and nutrition insecurity, IV. Presence of economic opportunities/markets relevant to the project; V. impacts of climate change and natural resources degradation; and VI. Relative security.
  • 15. Geographic Area of Intervention…. ✓ High poverty prevalence, based on inclusion in the productive safety net program (PSNP) ✓ High climate vulnerability ✓ High vulnerability to other factors (food security, poverty, gender inequality, water, education, agriculture); ✓ The level of degradation of the productive natural resource base (particularly soil, water and trees); ✓ Minimized overlap with kebeles under PASDIP II; Number of Woreda and Selection Criteria ✓ No overlap with LLRP supported; ✓ Proximity to private sector providers of goods and services; and ✓ Synergies WFP fresh food voucher programme in amhara. ✓ The number of woredas are distributed in proportion to the population. The target woredas allow for linkages with RUFIP III and complementarities with PASIDP II areas. ❑ A total of 90 food-insecure woredas have been prioritized based on:
  • 16. Region # Woredas Target HHs Total Members Amhara 20 33,333 166,667 Central Ethiopia 6 10,000 50,000 Oromia 32 53,333 266,667 Sidama 4 6,667 33,333 Somali 9 15,000 75,000 South Ethiopia 7 11,667 58,333 South West Ethiopia 3 5,000 25,000 Afar 3 5,000 25,000 Tigray 6 10,000 50,000 Total 90 150,000 750,000 Geographic Area of Intervention…
  • 17. 1 Community Engagement Representatives of local communities played a pivotal role in identifying key challenges of the rural communities of the intervention areas. 2 Regional level Participation Regional officials and experts participated in developing of concept concept note of the programme by by consulting the respective communities. 3 Federal level Participation The federal officials and technical team from all respective departments departments in and out of the Ministry of Agriculture actively participated in facilitating discussion in regions and consolidating consolidating the the final concept note of the program. Participatory Design Process
  • 19. Selected Value Chain Commodities ❖ Cereals (Wheat) ❖ Fruits (Avocado, Banana) ❖ Vegetables(Onion, Tomato and Head Cabbage) ❖ Livestock (Poultry, Forage, Cattle fattening and Shoat) 10 in 10 National Programmes − Wheat(Bread & Durum) − Green Legacy (Avocado, Banana, Bamboo) − Vegetables(Onion, Tomato) − Red meat (Cattle fattening and Shoat) − Poultry (Egg and Chicken Meat)
  • 20. Key Approaches and Targeting Strategy ➢ Climate-smart landscape development, ➢ Inclusive community empowerment, ➢ Community-led, ➢ Market-oriented production and ➢ Nutrition sensitive Key Approaches
  • 21. Targeting Strategy 1 2 3 Geographic targeting, based on the identification of priority districts Self-targeting, of poor households Direct targeting of the specific groups The targeting strategy will also include: the selection of enterprises that have a b Potential for inclusion of poor households, women, and youth Potential positive impacts on nutrition and climate change adaptation Availability of natural resources for production Availability of markets b d c
  • 22. The primary target group 1 • Poor households with land holding less than 2ha of cultivable land with limited livestock,); 2 • Pastoralists 3 • Agropastoral engaged in less diversified traditional livelihood systems 4 • PWD in rural areas, 5% (7,500) PWD who are economically active 5 • Rural underemployed and unemployed youths owning no or small land, 40% (60,000) female and male youth between 18-34 years 6 • Female-headed households, 50% (75,000)
  • 23. Programme Goal and Objective The program aims to decrease poverty and enhance rural resilience through sustainable development and resilience enhancement, fostering inclusive and equitable development The PDO aims to empower 150,000 rural HHs in selected kebeles to improve their incomes, food and nutrition security, and resilience to external shocks The program, spanning seven years, aims to support livelihoods, promote entrepreneurship, and develop infrastructure in target communities through various activities (June 2023 to December 2030) The program focuses on inclusivity in rural HHs, ensuring all community members benefit from interventions, improving well-being, resilience, and quality of life, contributing to poverty reduction and sustainable development.
  • 24. Strategic Focus • The program aligns with the country's strategic frameworks, ✓ promoting gender equality and women's empowerment, ✓ aiming to create jobs for young people, including those with disabilities. • The program supports community-led initiatives, sustainable use of natural resources, and improved agricultural productivity. • It aligns with ✓ The National Rural Development Policy, ✓ National Agricultural Investment Plan, ✓ Agriculture Sector Ten-Year Plan, ✓ Nationally Determined Contribution and Climate Resilient Green Economy strategy, ✓ Climate Smart Agriculture and National Adaptation Plan, ✓ Digital Ethiopia Strategy and Ten-Year Development Plan, and ✓ Ethiopia Food System Transformation Roadmap. • It complements the government's efforts to implement the momentum from the 2021 Food System Summit and achieve food system transformation objectives.
  • 25. The intervention are expected to contribute ; a) Improve resilience to market and environmental shocks, b) Create green jobs and entrepreneurship for rural youths and women, including for those living with a disability; c) Economic empowerment, increased voice and participation in decision-making bodies, and more equitable workload for women; d) Increased access to improved dietary choices and nutritious foods,
  • 26. Programme Outcomes 1 Outcome 1 Enhanced sustainable and equitable access to natural resources and increased agricultural productivity. 2 Outcome 2 Increased access to remunerative markets of targeted value chains. 3 Outcome 3 Institutions and policy capacity strengthened.
  • 27. Programme Outputs 1.1 Community-led climate resilient and natural resources management 3 1.2 1.2 1.3 2.1 1.1 2.2 3.1 3.2 Climate resilient infrastructure developed Climate Market-Oriented and Nutrition-sensitive Climate-resilient Food Production and Productivity improved Market Access and Business to Business linkages established Access to Financial Services for Producers and Agribusinesses improved Policy support & engagement in PACT-related focused areas strengthened Institutions strengthened
  • 29. Components and key Focus Area The Component will support: a) Community-led equitable access & and adaptive sustainable use & and management of natural resources; b) Market-led & climate-adapted pastoral & smallholder production & productivity enhancement of target commodities; c) Development of inclusive and equitable water and market infrastructure; & d) Improved nutrition. Component 1: Community-Led Climate-Smart Productive Landscapes
  • 30. Components and key Focus Area…. a) Community sensitization and organizing Landscape Coordination Committee (LCC). b) Assessment and prioritization of landscapes based on their degradation status and climate vulnerability c) Community-led preparation of landscape development and investment plans (LDIPs) i. integrated natural resources management, ii. water infrastructure for households, crops, and livestock, iii. crop and livestock production enhancement and iv. Market access improvement, Subcomponent 1.1 Community-led Climate Resilient Development and Natural Resource Management (NRM) d) Implementation of NRM and soil health improvement measures i. Soil and water conservation measures ii. Pasture land management iii. Establishment of National Soil Testing Facility iv. Compensation of smallholder farmers for Carbon farming v. Promotion of improved cookstoves vi. Biogas systems for cooking and lighting vii. Job Creation through landscape management activities
  • 31. Components and key Focus Area…. i. Development of improved farmer-led small-scale irrigation systems ▪ Identification of Potential Schemes and Prefeasibility Rapid Assessment ii.Development of Multiple-Use Water Systems (MUS) ▪ Identification of Potential MUS Sites and Prefeasibility Rapid Assessment; ▪ Feasibility Studies; ▪ MUS Detailed Design and Works Supervision; ▪ Quality assurance of Feasibility and Design Studies; iii.Rehabilitation of existing water Infrastructure ▪ Site identification and Feasibility Studies; ▪ Schemes Detailed Design and Rehabilitation Works Supervision ▪ Quality assurance of Feasibility and Design Studies. Sub-component 1.2: Climate Resilient Infrastructure Development:
  • 32. Components and key Focus Area…. a) Support to digital agriculture extension; ▪ Production of Video materials on ARM and other extension messaging for farmer training under FTCs; ▪ Disability inclusion expert to review the digital modules content and training materials & provide expert guidance during training; ▪ Promotion and Awareness for the Digital Platform through Cooperatives/FTCs and Agribusiness; b) Capacity building of extension staff c) Support to farmers i. Support the FBS/FFS with inputs for demonstration of enterprises on the farm groups; ii.Demonstration support for rain-fed agriculture at FTC d) Nutrition SBCC design TA and roll-out implementation support (mass media, community influencer training, M&E) Subcomponent 1.3: Market-Oriented, Nutrition-sensitive and Climate- Resilient Food Production and Productivity
  • 33. Components and key Focus Area…. a) Inclusive digital value chain assessment and partner business companies’ identification; • Digital data collection of base market information to feed into the market platform; • Digital Mapping; Subcomponent 2.1: Market Access Linkage Support b) Capacity building of experts • Business facilitation skill training to ATI, BoA, and Cooperative Promotion Office Staff; c) Develop the Capacity of Cooperatives and Unions to Graduate to Professional Business Organizations • Cooperative Graduation Training Package Trainers ToT. Component 2: Agribusiness Development
  • 34. Components and key Focus Area… Subcomponent 2.2: Tailored Business and Finance Linkage to Young men and women Agripreneurs Tailored training for different types of agri-businesses to enhance entrepreneurial attitude and business management skills; Business plan development support; Seed capital; Skill-based training depending on demand Mentorship; and Engagement in policy dialogue.
  • 35. Components and key Focus Area…. Component 3: Institutional and Policy Strengthening and Implementation Support Services Subcomponent 3.1: Institutional Strengthening and Policy Support Subcomponent 3.2: Programme Coordination and Implementation Support Services
  • 36. Partnership Area of collaboration ▪ Carbon market ▪ Knowledge generation and capacity development ▪ Digital service ▪ Mechanization services
  • 37. Partnership... Partner Fund source Potential areas of collaboration Development Bank of Ethiopia (DBE) IGREENFI N 2 • IGREENFIN will provide loan for climate adaptation and resilience interventions under component 1 of PACT Ethiopian Associations of Persons with Disabilities (EAPD) GTM and IFAD • PACT will liaise with FEAPD and its affiliates at regional, zonal, and Woreda levels during disability inclusion mainstreaming FAO EU-funded • Food safety frameworks and training materials development for the cooperatives • Study to identify marketable pathways for biofortified crops and benefit from early-generation seeds • Dissemination and systematization of CSA practices and technologies • support to (young) agripreneurs Partner Fund source Potential areas of collaboration Vita VITA, IFAD, and community • Energy saving/carbon trading Acorn/Rabobank ASAP • Agroforestry/Carbon trading. Lersha IFAD • Provision of mechanization services • Leverage gender-responsive services, and explore disability inclusion to facilitate access to inputs and mechanization services • Digital extension services JICA IFAD and JICA • SHEP approach • NSA model villages in Amhara and Oromia regions CD4RM/PARM IFAD • DRR technical support, a platform for DRR ATI IFAD Grant • Extension services, market linkages, and e- vouchers. • Digital platform that supports productivity market access and arm-related information dissemination. • Business-to-business relationships building in their initiatives in the different commodity clusters
  • 38. Planning Process Consultation with the community and identification of issues to be addressed Review and consolidation by Woreda technical team Approval by Woreda steering committee Review and consolidation by Regional PCMU and technical team Approval by Regional steering committee Review and consolidation by Federal PCMU and technical team Approval by National steering committee Implementation Planning and Budgeting
  • 39. Programme Budget Summary USD (’000) Component and subcomponent IFAD grant ASAP+_1 grant ASAP+_2 grant GTM EU IGREENFIN TBC GOV Private sector Beneficiaries Total 1) Community-led climate-smart productive landscapes 61,256.59 6,951.00 3,524.64 5,010.73 17,333.45 35,012.56 - 17,376.77 1,711.68 10,269.41 158,446.83 1.1 Community-led climate resilient development and natural resource management 4,529.68 - 3,524.64 3,709.53 - 13,473.50 - 2,583.65 - 3,898.33 31,719.32 1.2 Climate resilient infrastructure development 51,550.68 - - - 17,333.45 21,000.00 - 13,870.67 1,711.68 6,364.84 111,831.32 1.3 Market-oriented production and productivity improvement of selected food commodities 5,176.22 6,951.00 - 1,301.20 - 539.06 - 922.45 - 6.25 14,896.19 2) Inclusive and equitable market access 7,609.95 - - - - - 2,011.22 327.60 1,952.60 - 11,901.37 2.1 Market access linkage support 6,993.13 - - - - - - 314.47 1,475.00 - 8,782.61 2.2 Support to women and men agripreneurs 616.82 - - - - - 2,011.22 13.13 477.60 - 3,118.76 3) Institutional and policy strengthening and implementation support services 9,337.20 - - - 507.29 - - 473.55 - - 10,318.04 3.1 Institutional strengthening and policy support 321.92 - - - - - - 8.47 - - 330.39 3.2 Programme coordination and implementation support services 9,015.28 - - - 507.29 - - 465.08 - - 9,987.65 Grand Total 78,203.73 6,951.00 3,524.64 5,010.73 17,840.75 35,012.56 2,011.22 18,177.92 3,664.28 10,269.41 180,666.24
  • 40. Financers and their share Financer Area of Contribution Share(%) IFAD All area of the intervention 43.3 ASAP+_1 production and productivity improvement of selected food commodities 3.8 ASAP+_2 Infrastructure and Climate finances 2.0 GTM digital technology, women’s membership in rural institutions including FBS, Cooperatives, scaling up of gender transformative 2.8 EU Infrastructure and Climate finances 9.9 Financer Area of Contribution Share(%) IGREENFIN Sustainable utilization of water and other natural resources as well as emission reductions and sequestration of greenhouse gases 19.4 TBC (FAO) Support to women and men agripreneurs 1.1 GOV Contribution in the form of tax and investment cost 10.1 Private sector business-to-business linkage (storage and market shed) 2.0 Beneficiaries Contribution in cash, labour and material 5.7
  • 41. Fiduciary responsibilities ▪ IFAD-funded projects constitute a substantial proportion typically exceeding 85%; ✓ Effective procurement management, ▪ Section 7.05 of the General Conditions provides that procurement financed by IFAD shall be carried out by the provisions of : ✓ The Borrower/Recipient's procurement regulations, to the extent such are consistent with the IFAD Procurement Guidelines; ✓ The project-specific Procurement Arrangements, ▪ The Project Procurement Arrangements (PAL) govern the execution of project procurement operations concerning the acquisition of goods, works, and services under the Agreement; Eligible Expenditures and mis-procurement ✓The expenditure shall meet the reasonable cost of goods, works, and services required for the Project and be covered by the relevant AWPB and Procurement Plan and procured in conformity with the Fund's Procurement Guidelines, and the provisions of the Project Procurement Arrangements as further defined in article II, section 2.0. Mis-procurement • IFAD will not finance expenditures for goods, works, or services that have not been procured by these Guidelines and the financing agreement. This also constitutes Advance Contracting and Retroactive Financing. Procurement and financial management
  • 42. Summary of Budget by Region # of PACT Woreda 90 Total Budget (USD) S.N Region Formula Share (%) PACT Regions Formula Share (%) Share Within the PACT Share from 90 Woredas PACT Regions Share of the Region Budget Share (USD)'000 180,666.24 1 Tigray 6.03 Tigray 6.03 6.33 6 Federal 8.50 15,356.63 2 Afar 3.02 Afar 3.02 3.17 3 Afar 2.90 5,244.07 3 Amhara 21.60 Amhara 21.60 22.69 20 Amhara 20.76 37,507.22 4 Oromiya 34.46 Oromiya 34.46 36.20 32 Central Ethiopia 5.67 10,251.97 5 Somale 9.98 Somale 9.98 10.48 9 Oromia 33.12 59,837.91 6 Ben. Gumz 1.83 SNNP 12.90 13.55 13 Sidama 3.94 7,123.66 7 SNNP 12.90 Sidama 4.10 4.31 4 Somale 9.59 17,329.73 8 Sidama 4.10 South west 3.11 3.26 3 South Ethiopia 6.73 12,151.81 9 South west 3.11 95.20 100.00 90 South West Ethiopia 2.98 5,392.47 10 Gambela 1.33 Tigray 5.80 10,470.77 11 Hareri 0.76 100.00 180,666.24 12 Dire dawa 0.88 -
  • 43. Procurement… Procurement Systems (in-use) ▪ OPEN (Online end-to-end Procurement System) ▪ NOTUS(No Objection Tracking Utility System) for No Objection, ▪ CMT (Online contract monitoring tool) in IFAD Client Portal (ICP) Interim Financial Reporting (IFR) ▪ This is required both for reporting and disbursement ▪ It must be submitted under frequency and submission deadlines (on or before 30 days after the quarter ends)
  • 44. Fund Disbursement Based on FA Section (E) Article (3) (e) ➢For disbursement of funds to the regions and woredas, the Memorandums of Understanding (MoUs) by and between the Federal Government and participating regions, and between regions and woredas have been entered into. Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) ➢MoU will be signed between ▪ MoA with the regional BoA; ▪ The regional BoA with Zone and woreda agriculture office. ▪ The MoU will outline the roles, responsibilities, and expectations of each party, as well as the commitment to collaborate and support the successful implementation of the project. ▪ The MoU will serve as a formal agreement to foster cooperation, coordination, and shared accountability.
  • 45. Reporting Flow and Feedback The reports systematically provide actual results using the indicators designed in the planning phase. Results-based reports are used to demonstrate accountability to governing bodies. In writing the results report should: • Describe what was achieved and list the indicators of success; • Compare actual results with expected results; • Quantify achievement whenever possible against a baseline; • Illuminate findings with quotes, testimonials, photos, etc; • Explain the reasons for over or under- achievement; • Highlight any unforeseen problems or opportunities that may require new strategies or a redesign of the initiative; • Tell the story of how the results were achieved, and highlight when there is potential for wider learning of lessons; • Recognize the involvement of others (partners or/and stakeholders) and assign a degree of attribution, if possible; • Ensure there is sufficient data to describe the effects of activities undertaken. Zone coordinators RPCMU FPCMU Kebele coordinators Woreda coordinators Flow of Feedback Flow of reports IWUA/WUA Watershed committee Cooperatives Landscape committee Produce an effective results-based report. An effective report can also highlight challenges, areas of inefficiency, and poor results. Quality criteria for result reporting include the following six areas: • Completeness; • Balance (good and bad); • Consistency (between sections); • Substantiveness and reliability; • Clarity, and • Timeliness
  • 46. ከማምረት በላይ Beyond Production መገናኛ አካባቢ ፖ. ሳ. ቁ 62347 አዲስ አበባ ኢትዮጵያ ስልክ፡ +25111646137 ፣ ፋክስ፡ +251116462311 ፣ ነፃ የስልክ መስመር፡ 888 ፌስቡክ፡ Ministry of Agriculture-Ethiopia ቲውተር ፡ www.moa.gov.et Megenagna Area P O Box 62347 Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Tel፡ +25111646137 ፣ Fax፡ +251116462311 Face book፡ Ministry of Agriculture-Ethiopia twitter፡ www.moa.gov.et Thank You!!