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LITERATURE
STUDY
HOSTELS
By S.HAVARDHAN REDDY-319106101029
K.GAYATHRI DEVI-319106101010
K.LAVANYA SIRI CHANDANA-319106101011
This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY-SA.
WHAT IS A HOSTEL
A hostel is a form of low-cost, short-
term shared sociable lodging where
guests can rent a bed, usually
a bunk bed in a dormitory, with
shared use of a lounge and
sometimes a kitchen. Rooms can be
mixed or single-sex and have private
or shared bathrooms. Private rooms
may also be available, but the
property must offer dormitories to
be considered a hostel.
REQUIREMENTS
IN A HOSTEL
Lobby/reception
Multipurpose hall
Dining hall
Locker room
Pantry and kitchen
Bedrooms{multiple types or similar type }
Recreational area[garden or park or pool]
Laundry and storage
Control/security room
Waste disposal
bathrooms
SAFETY AND SECURITY
REQUIREMENTS
• METAL DETECTORS
• CCTV
• UNDER BELLY SCANNERS TO
SCREEN VEHICLES
• SMOKE DETECTORS, THESE CAN
BE BATTERY OPERATED.
• FIRE AND EMERGENCY ALARMS
WITH VISUAL & AUDIBLE
SIGNALS
• FIRST AID KIT WITH OVER THE
COUNTER MEDICINES WITH
FRONT DESK
This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY-SA.
KITCHEN
REQUIREMENTS
• REFRIGERATOR WITH DEEP FREEZE.
• SEGREGATED STORAGE OF MEAT , FISH AND
VEGETABLES
• TILED WALLS NON –SLIP FLOORS
• VENTILATION SYSTEM
• GARBAGE TO BE SEGREGATED –WET AND
DRY, TO ENCOURAGE RECYCLING.
• WET GARBAGE AREA TO BE AIR
CONDITIONED
• RECEIVING AREAS AND STORES, SEPERATE
FROM GARBAGE AREA
This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY.
BASIC AREA REQUIRED ACCORDING TO TIME
SAVERS STANDARDS[METRE SQUARE]
• LOBBY + RECEPTION 102.19
• CLOAK ROOM 14.86
• RECREATIONAL AREAS(OUTDOOR) as required
• BANQUET 217.39
• TECHNICAL/MECHANICAL ROOMS 171.87
• LAUNDRY + STORAGE 66.89
• KITCHEN + STORAGE 118.91
• WASTE DISPOSAL 7.43
STUDENT
ROOMS OR
DORMITORIES
• REQUIREMENTS IN A ROOM
ARE:
• BED
• DESK
• WARDROBE
• CHAIR
• BOOKSHELF OR CASE
STUDENT ROOMS OR
DORMITORIES
Types ol Spaces
• 1 . Single rooms. The single room provides
controlled privacy for its occupant with rospect
to all other students It may open directly to a
corridor and thus provide complete privacy
coming and going.
• 2. Split double rooms. The split double room
provides the social contact obtained by two
students sharing a common space but, at the
same time, recognizes and solves the prob- lem
of conflict of interest in the student s social and
study activities.
• 3 Four-student room Four students sharing one
room have the same problems as the students
sharing double- or triple-occu- pancy rooms
This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY-SA.
STUDENT
ROOMS OR
DORMITORIES
1 . Room dimensions must accommodate:
a. Furniture sizes and design (wail mounted, freestanding) h Furniture use spaces c.
Combination of furniture items
2. Room size (and shape) will affect two lev- els of possible room change:
a. Adaptability of furniture arrangements
b. Divisibility of spaces — physical or vi- sual separation of activities
Single Rooms
a. Minimum recommended area 90 sq ft
h Optimum recommended area 110 sq
H
C- Generous recommended area — 120 sq
Ft
Double rooms with bunked beds
a Minimum recommended area — 140 sq ft
b. Optimum recommended area 160 sq ft
c. Generous recommended area 1 80 sq ft
Double rooms without bunked beds
a. Minimum recommended ares — 180 sq ft
b. Optimum recommended area— 220 sq ft
c. Generous recommended area— 240 sq ft
STUDENT
ROOMS AND
DORMITORIES
Environment
1 . Thermal. Student rooms require an ap- propriate thermal environment for
the func- tions carried on within them. The environment is effected by
temperature, ventilation, humidity. radiation, and the quality of air
produced by filtration.
2. Lighting. The quality of lighting in stu- dent rooms is determined by the
quantity and brightness of both the light sources and their general
surroundings. High illumination levels are appropriate to study; lower
levels to social functions. In tho daytime, natural daylight may provide
much of the necessary illumination if windows are well placed and the
glare eliminated.
3. Acoustics. Quiet is the most desired characteristic of any living
arrangement in tho opinion of students, so acoustical considera- tions are
of great importance Fundamental to providing quiet environments are
walls, floors, windows, and doors providing adequate reduc- tion of sound
from adjacent activities.
4.Color, texture, materials Materials pres- ently used are hard, unyielding,
and chosen lor their durability ond ease of maintenance. How- ever, those
used invariably lead to a depress- ing, sterile, institutional appearance.
FACILITIES
1 . Bathing.
The gang bath is one of the most persistent features of residence halls. It has
been defended on the basis of economy and its contribution to socialization.
Certainly, the initial construction cost of one central gang bath is less than that of
smaller installations in several locations. It is olso evi- dent that when a
bathroom serves more than n few students, maintenance becomes nobody's
business but the university's: the student does not realize that he is paying
extra for the uni- versity's maintanonco of the gang bathroom. The initial extra
expense for smaller buths will actually result in long-term cost savings if the
students themsolvos maintain the smaller bath- room, because it eliminates
the need for maid service throughout the life of the building.
Another economic factor against the gang bath is its inflexibility. Residence halls
with gang baths are far less appropriate for partici- pants in conventions,
reunions, and institutes where families or both sexes are involved than are ureas
with smaller baths serving a few persons
require one standard 60 inch (1525mm) wide toilet compartment. Minimum 60
inch (1525mm) diameter or T-Shaped turning spaces are also required, as well as
an accessible lavatory, restroom accessories
FACILITIES
2. Dining.
There is universal agreement that the single, large rooms for hundreds of
students is not the satisfactory solution to theproblem of student dining
facilities .Although the large kitchen with its extensive equipment,
service line arrangements, and building area is the most economical and
efficient method of food preparation, the one large dining room for all
students negates a congenial atmosphere for social interaction during
mealtime.
Dining facilities that combine the best advantage of the large kitchen —
efficiency, econo- my. and flexibility — while at the same time pro-
viding a pleasant and social dining environment can be built Proper
planning permits large central areas to be divided by movable walls
into smaller or intimate dining rooms. The walls can be moved when a
large scale is needed for social events such as dances, etc
Minimum space required is 45sq m
FACILITIES
3. Recreation and social activity
Assimilation into the student society is the foremost concern of
most new students. Recreational spaces and facilities are
important in providing environmental support to the personal
interac- tion of students, both new and old, since aca- demic
assimilation and involvement ore not re- stricted to the
classroom or student room. However, care must be taken in the
areas pro- grammed for recreation so that they truly ac-
commodate the intended activities. Otherwise, the spaces will
fail to accomplish the intended purposes. Evaluation of the
success of social spaces in meeting their intended needs indi-
cates thut a variety of smaller spaces ore likely to be the most
popular and useful.
FACILITIES
5- Service and storage
The university must provide facilities for (1) maintenance of buildings, (2)
the mechanical and electrical equipment, and (3) overflow storage
from stu- dent rooms.
Increasing affluence of students and the growth of disposable articles
have increased space requirements for efficient trash collec- tion and
removal. Trash chutes, central collec- tion facilities, and dumping
trucks are required to handle present volumes of trash Too often this
involves the ugly exposure of the trash while awaiting collection, as
well as the con- siderable fire hazard.
A minimum floor space per bed (or bunk) of 4 square metre (44 square
feet) to be provided
FACILITIES
6. Circulation and interrelation of spaces
The residence hall is a social organism. The re- lationship of
student rooms one to another and to the public and
service rooms make up a total environment most
conveniently studied as a hierarchy of spaces. The
hierarchy is deter- mined by the student activities and the
physical characteristics of the building.
Unit size is defined by building spaces, activ- ities related to
space, and by agents of regu- lation and control. For example,
a numboi of rooms served by a bathroom constitutes a suite,
group, or floor. A number of rooms under the direction of a
resident assistant will establish a unit. All the rooms on one
floor having common access and services may also be con-
sidered as a unit.
FACILITIES
locker room
MECHANICAL
DEVICES/
FURNITURE IN
HOSTEL
LIST:
• Bed
• Desk
• Drafting table
• Soft chair
• Wardrobe
• Bookshelf
• Washing machine
• Television
• Water purifier
• Fridge
• Bed
• Drafting table
• Washing machine
• Soft chair
• wardrobe
• desk
• Water purifier
• Dish washer
• Television
• Fridge
Literature study Hostels
ARE HOSTEL BETTER
WHEN COMBINED OR
SEPARATED FOR BOTH
THE GENDERS?
OUR VIEW
◦ We personally think that hostel are better off when are separated for male and female students.
◦ The reason for this is matter of privacy , as India is a country with higher crime rate dominated towards
one gender and everyday these number are on a spike.
◦ Many assaults and harrassments have been reported when places with common dorms were made and this was
made a debatable topic.
◦ Well considering the fact that rooms for different gender can be arranged in the same building but restricting the
space to be accessed by opposite gender was imposed at many colleges and hostels.
◦ Having common spaces in hostel where both the male and female students have access at the same time is
allowed at many places , but have a specific time period to follow.
◦ These spaces are libraries in hostel, recreational areas like parks , garden , gyms etc.
◦ Most of the IIMs have coed hostels.
Literature study Hostels
POMONA College Student
Housing
E H R L I C H Y A N A I R H E E C H A N E Y
A R C H I T E C T S
• The project team for Pomona College’s new student housing complex was
tasked with honoring the school’s architectural heritage while ushering in its
new sustainability agenda. The development, the first student residence
in California to receive LEED Platinum certification, consists of two residence
halls that house 150 students in suites made up of three, four, and five
private bedrooms. The dwellings are intended for upperclassmen and were
built to address a growing need on campus to provide apartment-style living
for older students who might otherwise move off campus.
• From the top down, the structure is chock-full of high-performance
technologies that don’t detract from the historic ambience. Architect Steven
Ehrlich reimagined the terra-cotta on the original buildings’ sloped roofs into
horizontal plank sunscreens. Glazed clerestories and concrete exterior walls
with punched openings found on the older buildings reappear on the new
structures, but with high-performance operable glass units and insulated
precast wall panels.
• This LEED Platinum certified project was the first
student residence hall in California to receive
such a rating. The award-winning project consists
of two residence halls totaling 81,000 sf, housing
150 students in single bedroom, suite style living
units. The North hall houses 73 beds; the South
hall houses 77. Both buildings are 2 and 3 stories.
The project also includes the headquarters for the
campus Outdoor Action program and
administration offices for the Campus
Sustainability department both located on the
ground floor of the South hall in addition to an
underground 175 car parking garage with a
natural turf field above located directly below the
North hall
• He carefully sized and placed windows to
optimize natural daylight into each space,
and provide more than 95 percent of all
regularly occupied spaces with a direct
view to the outdoors. A 165-square-foot
natural turf playing field on top of the
underground garage is used for intramural
Frisbee tournaments, lacrosse training,
socializing, and sunbathing.
• The College's progressive sustainable agenda catalyzed the complex's
new architecture, which departs from the campus' predominant terracotta
tile roof vernacular. The design includes flat roofs that harvest energy and
provide outdoor teaching and research spaces. The project includes an
82kW rooftop photovoltaic array system with 130,000 annual kWh output,
producing 14% of the annual electrical needs, and a rooftop solar thermal-
siphon system consisting of eighteen 116-gallon water tanks providing 80%
of the building's domestic hot water heating.
• Ehrlich’s close collaboration with the school included weekly meetings with
the project task force consisting of numerous stakeholders including
students, staff, and administrators that extended from the beginning of
programming to the end of construction.
• The judges were wowed by the many sustainable features packed into the
project, which also include rainwater reuse and retention, low-VOC paints
and adhesives, bike storage, and drought-resistant landscaping. Flat roofs
clad with cool roof thermoplastic membranes support PV arrays, rooftop
gardens, and eco-classrooms.
• Exterior sunshades composed of horizontal
terracotta baguettes or fins screen public
areas located directly behind and enclosed by
floor-to-ceiling glass in direct response to the
harsh conditions of the arid desert-like
climate of Claremont while also tying back to
the materiality and architectural heritage of
the surrounding campus. Thermal mass is
achieved by a cast-in-place concrete
structure and precast concrete exterior wall
panels that also refer to and echo existing
campus buildings.
• Through the incorporation of numerous
smart design features the project functions
as an example of living sustainability and
as a teaching tool for students – helping
raise awareness, educate and even assist
occupants in making more informed
choices about how they interact with and
ultimately impact their environment.
Literature study Hostels
Vietnamhostel
Brief
• The VietNam Hostel Is constructed
in the year 2018 in 600 sq m area
and is built opposite to Han Market,
the most famous place in Da Nang
for all residents and tourists
worldwide. Han Market is regarded
as the heart of the city. Every day,
thousands of visitors come to visit
and go shopping here, especially
buy the local specialties. In
addition, it takes less than a minute
to walk from the VietNam Hostel to
the romantic Han River. From here,
tourists can easily travel around the
city.
• The VietNam Hostel is designed in a
minimalist way, which eliminates all
complicated elements to reduce the
investment cost as low as possible but
still ensures the maximum use factor. So,
they use a lot of simple and inexpensive
materials. And especially, they limit the
materials that damage the environment
such as paint, gypsum, etc. They prefer to
use environmentally friendly solutions
such as construction of unbaked bricks,
not plastered walls in the house to limit
the use of cement. In addition, They also
use a lot of trees and sunlight to get the
sun and wind for the purpose of making
the space airier and friendlier, which
reduces the hardness of the materials.
• On the 1st floor: they pushed back the
whole building back to the back to
reserve a space for parking and
garden to isolate the riotous noise of
the Han Market and the streets. In
addition, the area is used to enjoy
coffee and watch the streets. Inside,
the reception area is one side. The
rest is used to make restaurants and
coffee shop to serve both the guests
of the hostel and frequent guests. The
back of the building is office and
garden. Elevators are designed with
glass to provide a spacious and airy
feeling.
Literature study Hostels
On the 2nd and 3rd floors: They are the beginning of the residence floor,
including the Dorm rooms. Between the rooms is a well and the space
has green trees, people can walk to these areas to work, relax, talk, and
smoke comfortably without disturbing the other on the inside.
On the 4th floor: This floor included Private rooms, playground, coffee
shop and shared kitchen.
On the 5th floor: they designed two apartments. Why do They do
that? There are two reasons: firstly, this land is rented for
construction, so the owner needs a financial security plan. If we
construct the apartment above, it is very easy to rent for a better
price than the Hostel. Secondly, due to the demand for tourist
apartments in this area is very large, however, the surrounding area
is not enough to serve.
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• The VietNam Hostel is
designed and built with the
purpose to bring visitors
exciting experiences when
coming to Danang. And
through this project, it proves
One can completely build the
works at low cost, preferably
use less harmful solutions to
the environment, but they are
still beautiful. Most
importantly, they satisfy the
users.
Literature study Hostels
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INTRODUCTION
The campus of Ganeshi Lal Agrawal University in Mathura – a city in the Indian state of Uttar
Pradesh, 150 kilometers south of New Delhi – includes this student hostel designed by the
Mumbai-based practice of Sanjay Puri. Offering 800 rooms, the five four-story buildings
interact organically, snaking in a way that ensures natural lighting and cross ventilation.
Connected by a central corridor on each floor, the rooms have small wedge-shaped
miradors facing the garden areas. Identified by color codes, the blocks join at their tips to
accommodate the more public areas: cafeteria, lounges, reception, and gym. As for energy
efficiency, solar panels on the roof and rainwater collection devices complement natural
climatization systems..
BRIEF DESCRIPTION PROVIDED BY THE
ARCHITECTS
Taking a cue from the old city streets of Mathura city in India where this project is located,
this 800 room students’ hostel creates organic spaces. Designed in 4 level high, 5 linear
blocks, the built spaces snake across a wedge shaped site twisting and turning along
their length. Sitting adjacent to repetitive hostel blocks on the east and west these new
hostels within a large university campus create individual spaces within a discernible
identity in each part of the layout.
The orientation of all the buildings are done with a view of generating large north
facing garden areas overlooking a vast playground towards the north. In addition,
each hostel room is punctuated with a wedge shaped bay window oriented
towards the north and the playground. Each hostel room has ventilation openings
in the internal corridor facilitating cross ventilation. The linear buildings create
small break out spaces at each bending point allowing natural light into the
internal circulation spaces.
These factors create an energy efficient building minimizing heat gain in response to the
climate which has average temperature in excess of 300 c for 8 months of the year
when the sun is in the Southern Hemisphere. During the winter months when the sun is
in the Northern Hemisphere, direct sunlight is facilitated to prevent the rooms from
becoming cold. Two focal areas are created at the ends of the linear buildings to house
cafeterias, games rooms and gymnasium opening into the north facing gardens and
terraces. Each of the public spaces are large volumes with 20’ high ceilings.
Literature study Hostels
The organic layout of the buildings characterizes each space within the
site. Color accentuates different blocks and facilitates within. Each block
is differently colored along with the internal face of the bay windows of
the hostel in bright colors to create an identity.
SITE DETAILS
Rainwater harvesting, water recycling and usage of solar panels additionally
make the project more energy efficient along with the orientation and
facilitation of natural ventilation. The street is contextual to the climate and the
orientation of the site, thus creating varied experiences and changing
perceptions of space in each part of the six-acre site.
SITE ELEVATION AND SECTION
Mann school hostel
• Today, educational institutions
and campuses have evolved
from being bland and boring
boxes to innovative and
practical buildings that intend to
foster learning in a welcoming
and uplifting environment. The
vision for the design for the
Girls’ Hostel at The Mann
School centres on the
importance of providing
facilities to promote learning
and all-round development at a
home-away-from-home.
• The hostel building was
proposed within the complex of
the school since the existing
boarding facilities could not cater
to the increasing number of
students and their requirements.
The idea was to create a safe
environment for the girls with all
the necessary functional
requirements and a multitude of
public spaces. The new building
is positioned between the
executive block and the senior
academic wing and houses
dormitories for grade 1-12, a
study hall, and common
recreational areas like a games
and television room, a computer
room, and a salon.
• It carries on the legacy of the school
ethos with openness and continuity
as part of the design intent. The
campus’ existing colour scheme of
red and grey is maintained while
brick is used as a critical design
element on the facades to help the
new building blend cohesively within
its surroundings.
• A metal jaali is also installed on the
façade of the hostel building,
supplemented by the lush greenery
so that the building does not stick
out like a sore thumb with too much-
built mass.
• For the well-being of the children,
creating outdoor spaces such as gardens
and terraces and incorporating greenery
within the building was prioritised. The
hostel is planned to overlook a central
courtyard, with dormitories facing the
corridors to ensure a lively and
interactive environment. The corridors
are widened in an angular fashion to
accommodate seating spaces for
children to relax. The building opens out
at a different angle on every floor, with
inward-looking terraces staggered to
help create a sense of visual connection
for everyone, regardless of where they
are positioned.
• The residential facilities for younger children (grade 1-4) are
planned on the ground floor, so they don’t have to climb up
the stairs, thus ensuring safety. The dormitories are designed
to ensure optimal ingress of daylight and ventilation with
windows along the custom-designed bunk beds, allowing
each child with a view to the outside. The dining area, the
parent’s lounge, as well as recreational spaces like the
indoor play area are also located on the ground floor.The first
and second floors, on the other hand, are dedicated to
facilities for older students: 4-bedded and 6-bedded
dormitories with individual beds and study areas. The
infirmary and the salon are also positioned on the first floor to
accommodate all the facilities in one place, making the hostel
self-sufficient.e
• All the activity areas like the
common room, computer lab,
and the games room are
planned in the basement
around the central courtyard
and the sunken amphitheatre,
making it the most lively zone
in the building. Designed as an
extension of the common
room, the amphitheatre acts as
a congregation spot where
students and staff often come
together to celebrate birthday
parties and musical get-
togethers.
• Children who are far away from
home require immense physical
and emotional support. The
school is like a parent to them,
and hence safety was
considered an essential part of
the design. The warden’s
residence is planned within the
building and overlooks the
central courtyard, giving her a
complete view of the hostel from
her living room while retaining a
sense of privacy. Also, the
number of building entry and
exit points are reduced,
windows are fitted with metal
grills, and criss-cross wires are
used between the handrails in
the corridors and the ceiling as a
precaution.
• Driven by sustainability, solar panels are installed on the terrace
of the building. The central courtyard is precisely aligned in the
North West - South East direction, to catch the southwesterly
winds during the monsoon, thus ensuring ventilation throughout
the building. The South and West walls of the building are made
with the rattrap bond (bricks are placed in a vertical position
instead of conventional horizontal position, creating a cavity) to
provide thermal comfort. Mud phuska (compacted soil with hay)
is used for thermal insulation to reduce the ingress of heat by
almost 70%. Bricks used on-site have been procured from local
kilns to reduce the carbon footprint. Even the finishes and
materials used in the building are low maintenance and
affordable - paint and tiles, granite, laminates on the door - all
keeping in mind that the setting is to be used by young children.
• All the site-excavated earth from the
basement is used to level and create
mounds in the garden in front of the girl’s
hostel. The debris that came out of the
construction material was utilised to make
the roads and footpaths of the school.
Timber from old trees withering away on
site was used to manufacture doors for the
building. Additionally, rainwater is
harvested from the 650 sqm. terrace into
two pits through a series of drains and
used for horticulture and flushing. A home
away from home – the Girls Hostel at Mann
School, New Delhi follows an empathetic
design approach, offering children a safe
learning environment with the freedom to
interact, engage and grow.
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Literature study Hostels

  • 1. LITERATURE STUDY HOSTELS By S.HAVARDHAN REDDY-319106101029 K.GAYATHRI DEVI-319106101010 K.LAVANYA SIRI CHANDANA-319106101011 This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY-SA.
  • 2. WHAT IS A HOSTEL A hostel is a form of low-cost, short- term shared sociable lodging where guests can rent a bed, usually a bunk bed in a dormitory, with shared use of a lounge and sometimes a kitchen. Rooms can be mixed or single-sex and have private or shared bathrooms. Private rooms may also be available, but the property must offer dormitories to be considered a hostel.
  • 3. REQUIREMENTS IN A HOSTEL Lobby/reception Multipurpose hall Dining hall Locker room Pantry and kitchen Bedrooms{multiple types or similar type } Recreational area[garden or park or pool] Laundry and storage Control/security room Waste disposal bathrooms
  • 4. SAFETY AND SECURITY REQUIREMENTS • METAL DETECTORS • CCTV • UNDER BELLY SCANNERS TO SCREEN VEHICLES • SMOKE DETECTORS, THESE CAN BE BATTERY OPERATED. • FIRE AND EMERGENCY ALARMS WITH VISUAL & AUDIBLE SIGNALS • FIRST AID KIT WITH OVER THE COUNTER MEDICINES WITH FRONT DESK This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY-SA.
  • 5. KITCHEN REQUIREMENTS • REFRIGERATOR WITH DEEP FREEZE. • SEGREGATED STORAGE OF MEAT , FISH AND VEGETABLES • TILED WALLS NON –SLIP FLOORS • VENTILATION SYSTEM • GARBAGE TO BE SEGREGATED –WET AND DRY, TO ENCOURAGE RECYCLING. • WET GARBAGE AREA TO BE AIR CONDITIONED • RECEIVING AREAS AND STORES, SEPERATE FROM GARBAGE AREA This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY.
  • 6. BASIC AREA REQUIRED ACCORDING TO TIME SAVERS STANDARDS[METRE SQUARE] • LOBBY + RECEPTION 102.19 • CLOAK ROOM 14.86 • RECREATIONAL AREAS(OUTDOOR) as required • BANQUET 217.39 • TECHNICAL/MECHANICAL ROOMS 171.87 • LAUNDRY + STORAGE 66.89 • KITCHEN + STORAGE 118.91 • WASTE DISPOSAL 7.43
  • 7. STUDENT ROOMS OR DORMITORIES • REQUIREMENTS IN A ROOM ARE: • BED • DESK • WARDROBE • CHAIR • BOOKSHELF OR CASE
  • 8. STUDENT ROOMS OR DORMITORIES Types ol Spaces • 1 . Single rooms. The single room provides controlled privacy for its occupant with rospect to all other students It may open directly to a corridor and thus provide complete privacy coming and going. • 2. Split double rooms. The split double room provides the social contact obtained by two students sharing a common space but, at the same time, recognizes and solves the prob- lem of conflict of interest in the student s social and study activities. • 3 Four-student room Four students sharing one room have the same problems as the students sharing double- or triple-occu- pancy rooms This Photo by Unknown author is licensed under CC BY-SA.
  • 9. STUDENT ROOMS OR DORMITORIES 1 . Room dimensions must accommodate: a. Furniture sizes and design (wail mounted, freestanding) h Furniture use spaces c. Combination of furniture items 2. Room size (and shape) will affect two lev- els of possible room change: a. Adaptability of furniture arrangements b. Divisibility of spaces — physical or vi- sual separation of activities Single Rooms a. Minimum recommended area 90 sq ft h Optimum recommended area 110 sq H C- Generous recommended area — 120 sq Ft Double rooms with bunked beds a Minimum recommended area — 140 sq ft b. Optimum recommended area 160 sq ft c. Generous recommended area 1 80 sq ft Double rooms without bunked beds a. Minimum recommended ares — 180 sq ft b. Optimum recommended area— 220 sq ft c. Generous recommended area— 240 sq ft
  • 10. STUDENT ROOMS AND DORMITORIES Environment 1 . Thermal. Student rooms require an ap- propriate thermal environment for the func- tions carried on within them. The environment is effected by temperature, ventilation, humidity. radiation, and the quality of air produced by filtration. 2. Lighting. The quality of lighting in stu- dent rooms is determined by the quantity and brightness of both the light sources and their general surroundings. High illumination levels are appropriate to study; lower levels to social functions. In tho daytime, natural daylight may provide much of the necessary illumination if windows are well placed and the glare eliminated. 3. Acoustics. Quiet is the most desired characteristic of any living arrangement in tho opinion of students, so acoustical considera- tions are of great importance Fundamental to providing quiet environments are walls, floors, windows, and doors providing adequate reduc- tion of sound from adjacent activities. 4.Color, texture, materials Materials pres- ently used are hard, unyielding, and chosen lor their durability ond ease of maintenance. How- ever, those used invariably lead to a depress- ing, sterile, institutional appearance.
  • 11. FACILITIES 1 . Bathing. The gang bath is one of the most persistent features of residence halls. It has been defended on the basis of economy and its contribution to socialization. Certainly, the initial construction cost of one central gang bath is less than that of smaller installations in several locations. It is olso evi- dent that when a bathroom serves more than n few students, maintenance becomes nobody's business but the university's: the student does not realize that he is paying extra for the uni- versity's maintanonco of the gang bathroom. The initial extra expense for smaller buths will actually result in long-term cost savings if the students themsolvos maintain the smaller bath- room, because it eliminates the need for maid service throughout the life of the building. Another economic factor against the gang bath is its inflexibility. Residence halls with gang baths are far less appropriate for partici- pants in conventions, reunions, and institutes where families or both sexes are involved than are ureas with smaller baths serving a few persons require one standard 60 inch (1525mm) wide toilet compartment. Minimum 60 inch (1525mm) diameter or T-Shaped turning spaces are also required, as well as an accessible lavatory, restroom accessories
  • 12. FACILITIES 2. Dining. There is universal agreement that the single, large rooms for hundreds of students is not the satisfactory solution to theproblem of student dining facilities .Although the large kitchen with its extensive equipment, service line arrangements, and building area is the most economical and efficient method of food preparation, the one large dining room for all students negates a congenial atmosphere for social interaction during mealtime. Dining facilities that combine the best advantage of the large kitchen — efficiency, econo- my. and flexibility — while at the same time pro- viding a pleasant and social dining environment can be built Proper planning permits large central areas to be divided by movable walls into smaller or intimate dining rooms. The walls can be moved when a large scale is needed for social events such as dances, etc Minimum space required is 45sq m
  • 13. FACILITIES 3. Recreation and social activity Assimilation into the student society is the foremost concern of most new students. Recreational spaces and facilities are important in providing environmental support to the personal interac- tion of students, both new and old, since aca- demic assimilation and involvement ore not re- stricted to the classroom or student room. However, care must be taken in the areas pro- grammed for recreation so that they truly ac- commodate the intended activities. Otherwise, the spaces will fail to accomplish the intended purposes. Evaluation of the success of social spaces in meeting their intended needs indi- cates thut a variety of smaller spaces ore likely to be the most popular and useful.
  • 14. FACILITIES 5- Service and storage The university must provide facilities for (1) maintenance of buildings, (2) the mechanical and electrical equipment, and (3) overflow storage from stu- dent rooms. Increasing affluence of students and the growth of disposable articles have increased space requirements for efficient trash collec- tion and removal. Trash chutes, central collec- tion facilities, and dumping trucks are required to handle present volumes of trash Too often this involves the ugly exposure of the trash while awaiting collection, as well as the con- siderable fire hazard. A minimum floor space per bed (or bunk) of 4 square metre (44 square feet) to be provided
  • 15. FACILITIES 6. Circulation and interrelation of spaces The residence hall is a social organism. The re- lationship of student rooms one to another and to the public and service rooms make up a total environment most conveniently studied as a hierarchy of spaces. The hierarchy is deter- mined by the student activities and the physical characteristics of the building. Unit size is defined by building spaces, activ- ities related to space, and by agents of regu- lation and control. For example, a numboi of rooms served by a bathroom constitutes a suite, group, or floor. A number of rooms under the direction of a resident assistant will establish a unit. All the rooms on one floor having common access and services may also be con- sidered as a unit.
  • 18. LIST: • Bed • Desk • Drafting table • Soft chair • Wardrobe • Bookshelf • Washing machine • Television • Water purifier • Fridge
  • 22. • Water purifier • Dish washer
  • 25. ARE HOSTEL BETTER WHEN COMBINED OR SEPARATED FOR BOTH THE GENDERS?
  • 26. OUR VIEW ◦ We personally think that hostel are better off when are separated for male and female students. ◦ The reason for this is matter of privacy , as India is a country with higher crime rate dominated towards one gender and everyday these number are on a spike. ◦ Many assaults and harrassments have been reported when places with common dorms were made and this was made a debatable topic. ◦ Well considering the fact that rooms for different gender can be arranged in the same building but restricting the space to be accessed by opposite gender was imposed at many colleges and hostels. ◦ Having common spaces in hostel where both the male and female students have access at the same time is allowed at many places , but have a specific time period to follow. ◦ These spaces are libraries in hostel, recreational areas like parks , garden , gyms etc. ◦ Most of the IIMs have coed hostels.
  • 28. POMONA College Student Housing E H R L I C H Y A N A I R H E E C H A N E Y A R C H I T E C T S
  • 29. • The project team for Pomona College’s new student housing complex was tasked with honoring the school’s architectural heritage while ushering in its new sustainability agenda. The development, the first student residence in California to receive LEED Platinum certification, consists of two residence halls that house 150 students in suites made up of three, four, and five private bedrooms. The dwellings are intended for upperclassmen and were built to address a growing need on campus to provide apartment-style living for older students who might otherwise move off campus. • From the top down, the structure is chock-full of high-performance technologies that don’t detract from the historic ambience. Architect Steven Ehrlich reimagined the terra-cotta on the original buildings’ sloped roofs into horizontal plank sunscreens. Glazed clerestories and concrete exterior walls with punched openings found on the older buildings reappear on the new structures, but with high-performance operable glass units and insulated precast wall panels.
  • 30. • This LEED Platinum certified project was the first student residence hall in California to receive such a rating. The award-winning project consists of two residence halls totaling 81,000 sf, housing 150 students in single bedroom, suite style living units. The North hall houses 73 beds; the South hall houses 77. Both buildings are 2 and 3 stories. The project also includes the headquarters for the campus Outdoor Action program and administration offices for the Campus Sustainability department both located on the ground floor of the South hall in addition to an underground 175 car parking garage with a natural turf field above located directly below the North hall
  • 31. • He carefully sized and placed windows to optimize natural daylight into each space, and provide more than 95 percent of all regularly occupied spaces with a direct view to the outdoors. A 165-square-foot natural turf playing field on top of the underground garage is used for intramural Frisbee tournaments, lacrosse training, socializing, and sunbathing.
  • 32. • The College's progressive sustainable agenda catalyzed the complex's new architecture, which departs from the campus' predominant terracotta tile roof vernacular. The design includes flat roofs that harvest energy and provide outdoor teaching and research spaces. The project includes an 82kW rooftop photovoltaic array system with 130,000 annual kWh output, producing 14% of the annual electrical needs, and a rooftop solar thermal- siphon system consisting of eighteen 116-gallon water tanks providing 80% of the building's domestic hot water heating. • Ehrlich’s close collaboration with the school included weekly meetings with the project task force consisting of numerous stakeholders including students, staff, and administrators that extended from the beginning of programming to the end of construction. • The judges were wowed by the many sustainable features packed into the project, which also include rainwater reuse and retention, low-VOC paints and adhesives, bike storage, and drought-resistant landscaping. Flat roofs clad with cool roof thermoplastic membranes support PV arrays, rooftop gardens, and eco-classrooms.
  • 33. • Exterior sunshades composed of horizontal terracotta baguettes or fins screen public areas located directly behind and enclosed by floor-to-ceiling glass in direct response to the harsh conditions of the arid desert-like climate of Claremont while also tying back to the materiality and architectural heritage of the surrounding campus. Thermal mass is achieved by a cast-in-place concrete structure and precast concrete exterior wall panels that also refer to and echo existing campus buildings.
  • 34. • Through the incorporation of numerous smart design features the project functions as an example of living sustainability and as a teaching tool for students – helping raise awareness, educate and even assist occupants in making more informed choices about how they interact with and ultimately impact their environment.
  • 37. Brief • The VietNam Hostel Is constructed in the year 2018 in 600 sq m area and is built opposite to Han Market, the most famous place in Da Nang for all residents and tourists worldwide. Han Market is regarded as the heart of the city. Every day, thousands of visitors come to visit and go shopping here, especially buy the local specialties. In addition, it takes less than a minute to walk from the VietNam Hostel to the romantic Han River. From here, tourists can easily travel around the city.
  • 38. • The VietNam Hostel is designed in a minimalist way, which eliminates all complicated elements to reduce the investment cost as low as possible but still ensures the maximum use factor. So, they use a lot of simple and inexpensive materials. And especially, they limit the materials that damage the environment such as paint, gypsum, etc. They prefer to use environmentally friendly solutions such as construction of unbaked bricks, not plastered walls in the house to limit the use of cement. In addition, They also use a lot of trees and sunlight to get the sun and wind for the purpose of making the space airier and friendlier, which reduces the hardness of the materials.
  • 39. • On the 1st floor: they pushed back the whole building back to the back to reserve a space for parking and garden to isolate the riotous noise of the Han Market and the streets. In addition, the area is used to enjoy coffee and watch the streets. Inside, the reception area is one side. The rest is used to make restaurants and coffee shop to serve both the guests of the hostel and frequent guests. The back of the building is office and garden. Elevators are designed with glass to provide a spacious and airy feeling.
  • 41. On the 2nd and 3rd floors: They are the beginning of the residence floor, including the Dorm rooms. Between the rooms is a well and the space has green trees, people can walk to these areas to work, relax, talk, and smoke comfortably without disturbing the other on the inside. On the 4th floor: This floor included Private rooms, playground, coffee shop and shared kitchen. On the 5th floor: they designed two apartments. Why do They do that? There are two reasons: firstly, this land is rented for construction, so the owner needs a financial security plan. If we construct the apartment above, it is very easy to rent for a better price than the Hostel. Secondly, due to the demand for tourist apartments in this area is very large, however, the surrounding area is not enough to serve.
  • 52. • The VietNam Hostel is designed and built with the purpose to bring visitors exciting experiences when coming to Danang. And through this project, it proves One can completely build the works at low cost, preferably use less harmful solutions to the environment, but they are still beautiful. Most importantly, they satisfy the users.
  • 55. INTRODUCTION The campus of Ganeshi Lal Agrawal University in Mathura – a city in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, 150 kilometers south of New Delhi – includes this student hostel designed by the Mumbai-based practice of Sanjay Puri. Offering 800 rooms, the five four-story buildings interact organically, snaking in a way that ensures natural lighting and cross ventilation. Connected by a central corridor on each floor, the rooms have small wedge-shaped miradors facing the garden areas. Identified by color codes, the blocks join at their tips to accommodate the more public areas: cafeteria, lounges, reception, and gym. As for energy efficiency, solar panels on the roof and rainwater collection devices complement natural climatization systems..
  • 56. BRIEF DESCRIPTION PROVIDED BY THE ARCHITECTS Taking a cue from the old city streets of Mathura city in India where this project is located, this 800 room students’ hostel creates organic spaces. Designed in 4 level high, 5 linear blocks, the built spaces snake across a wedge shaped site twisting and turning along their length. Sitting adjacent to repetitive hostel blocks on the east and west these new hostels within a large university campus create individual spaces within a discernible identity in each part of the layout.
  • 57. The orientation of all the buildings are done with a view of generating large north facing garden areas overlooking a vast playground towards the north. In addition, each hostel room is punctuated with a wedge shaped bay window oriented towards the north and the playground. Each hostel room has ventilation openings in the internal corridor facilitating cross ventilation. The linear buildings create small break out spaces at each bending point allowing natural light into the internal circulation spaces.
  • 58. These factors create an energy efficient building minimizing heat gain in response to the climate which has average temperature in excess of 300 c for 8 months of the year when the sun is in the Southern Hemisphere. During the winter months when the sun is in the Northern Hemisphere, direct sunlight is facilitated to prevent the rooms from becoming cold. Two focal areas are created at the ends of the linear buildings to house cafeterias, games rooms and gymnasium opening into the north facing gardens and terraces. Each of the public spaces are large volumes with 20’ high ceilings.
  • 60. The organic layout of the buildings characterizes each space within the site. Color accentuates different blocks and facilitates within. Each block is differently colored along with the internal face of the bay windows of the hostel in bright colors to create an identity.
  • 62. Rainwater harvesting, water recycling and usage of solar panels additionally make the project more energy efficient along with the orientation and facilitation of natural ventilation. The street is contextual to the climate and the orientation of the site, thus creating varied experiences and changing perceptions of space in each part of the six-acre site.
  • 65. • Today, educational institutions and campuses have evolved from being bland and boring boxes to innovative and practical buildings that intend to foster learning in a welcoming and uplifting environment. The vision for the design for the Girls’ Hostel at The Mann School centres on the importance of providing facilities to promote learning and all-round development at a home-away-from-home.
  • 66. • The hostel building was proposed within the complex of the school since the existing boarding facilities could not cater to the increasing number of students and their requirements. The idea was to create a safe environment for the girls with all the necessary functional requirements and a multitude of public spaces. The new building is positioned between the executive block and the senior academic wing and houses dormitories for grade 1-12, a study hall, and common recreational areas like a games and television room, a computer room, and a salon.
  • 67. • It carries on the legacy of the school ethos with openness and continuity as part of the design intent. The campus’ existing colour scheme of red and grey is maintained while brick is used as a critical design element on the facades to help the new building blend cohesively within its surroundings. • A metal jaali is also installed on the façade of the hostel building, supplemented by the lush greenery so that the building does not stick out like a sore thumb with too much- built mass.
  • 68. • For the well-being of the children, creating outdoor spaces such as gardens and terraces and incorporating greenery within the building was prioritised. The hostel is planned to overlook a central courtyard, with dormitories facing the corridors to ensure a lively and interactive environment. The corridors are widened in an angular fashion to accommodate seating spaces for children to relax. The building opens out at a different angle on every floor, with inward-looking terraces staggered to help create a sense of visual connection for everyone, regardless of where they are positioned.
  • 69. • The residential facilities for younger children (grade 1-4) are planned on the ground floor, so they don’t have to climb up the stairs, thus ensuring safety. The dormitories are designed to ensure optimal ingress of daylight and ventilation with windows along the custom-designed bunk beds, allowing each child with a view to the outside. The dining area, the parent’s lounge, as well as recreational spaces like the indoor play area are also located on the ground floor.The first and second floors, on the other hand, are dedicated to facilities for older students: 4-bedded and 6-bedded dormitories with individual beds and study areas. The infirmary and the salon are also positioned on the first floor to accommodate all the facilities in one place, making the hostel self-sufficient.e
  • 70. • All the activity areas like the common room, computer lab, and the games room are planned in the basement around the central courtyard and the sunken amphitheatre, making it the most lively zone in the building. Designed as an extension of the common room, the amphitheatre acts as a congregation spot where students and staff often come together to celebrate birthday parties and musical get- togethers.
  • 71. • Children who are far away from home require immense physical and emotional support. The school is like a parent to them, and hence safety was considered an essential part of the design. The warden’s residence is planned within the building and overlooks the central courtyard, giving her a complete view of the hostel from her living room while retaining a sense of privacy. Also, the number of building entry and exit points are reduced, windows are fitted with metal grills, and criss-cross wires are used between the handrails in the corridors and the ceiling as a precaution.
  • 72. • Driven by sustainability, solar panels are installed on the terrace of the building. The central courtyard is precisely aligned in the North West - South East direction, to catch the southwesterly winds during the monsoon, thus ensuring ventilation throughout the building. The South and West walls of the building are made with the rattrap bond (bricks are placed in a vertical position instead of conventional horizontal position, creating a cavity) to provide thermal comfort. Mud phuska (compacted soil with hay) is used for thermal insulation to reduce the ingress of heat by almost 70%. Bricks used on-site have been procured from local kilns to reduce the carbon footprint. Even the finishes and materials used in the building are low maintenance and affordable - paint and tiles, granite, laminates on the door - all keeping in mind that the setting is to be used by young children.
  • 73. • All the site-excavated earth from the basement is used to level and create mounds in the garden in front of the girl’s hostel. The debris that came out of the construction material was utilised to make the roads and footpaths of the school. Timber from old trees withering away on site was used to manufacture doors for the building. Additionally, rainwater is harvested from the 650 sqm. terrace into two pits through a series of drains and used for horticulture and flushing. A home away from home – the Girls Hostel at Mann School, New Delhi follows an empathetic design approach, offering children a safe learning environment with the freedom to interact, engage and grow.