Rigor, Relevance, Relationships

10,227 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
1 Comment
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Love this!!!!!
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total views
10,227
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
49
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
232
Comments
1
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Rigor, Relevance, Relationships

  1. 1. Teaching &Reaching forRigor, Relevance, Relationships<br />Why, What, How<br />January 2009<br />Merlene Gilb, WGSD<br />
  2. 2. Word <br />WINTER BREAK <br />Memoirs<br />Hemmingway Challenge . . . <br />
  3. 3. Fold a regular sheet of paper into the following graphic organizer (by folding it in half, then quarters, then folding over the closed corner, creating creases that look like the diagram below).<br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br /> <br />RIGOR . . . <br />
  4. 4. Defining RIGOR<br />RIGOR<br />The Frayer Model (Frayer, Frederick & Klausmeier, 1969)<br />
  5. 5. Joe’s Non-Netbook<br />
  6. 6. Knowledge<br />Skills <br />Attitudes (Dispositions, Deep-Seated Habits of Mind)<br />Persisting <br />Thinking and communicating with clarity and precision <br />Managing impulsivity <br />Gathering data through all senses <br />Listening with understanding and empathy <br />Creating, imagining, innovating <br />Thinking flexibly <br />Responding with wonderment and awe <br />Thinking about thinking (metacognition) <br />Taking responsible risks <br />Striving for accuracy <br />Finding humor <br />Questioning and posing problems <br />Thinking interdependently <br />Applying past knowledge to new situations <br />Remaining open to continuous learning <br />Curriculum Content<br />16 Habits of Mind -Arthur L. Costa and BenaKallick<br />
  7. 7. Curriculum Content Fostering Rigor<br />Developing More Curious Minds (2003), p. 26<br />
  8. 8. Engage Your Kids – Start the Conversation<br />What interests you in science?<br />What are you curious about now?<br />What do you want to learn more about?<br />What questions do you have about yourself?<br />What questions do you have about the world?<br />Developing Open Ended Inquiry<br />
  9. 9. Curiosity,as manifested through questions or inquiry, is fundamentally a human trait. <br />
  10. 10. When we ask kids to THINK CRITICALLY what should we expect from them?<br />Skepticism about given statements or an established norm or mode of doing things <br />McPeck, 1981, p.6<br />
  11. 11. The Most Important Questions a Teacher Can Ask ...<br />When an answer differs from our expectations . . . <br />When a student makes claims about correctness . . . <br />What Made You Think That Way?<br />How Do You Know?<br />
  12. 12. Defining RIGOR<br />RIGOR<br />The Frayer Model (Frayer, Frederick & Klausmeier, 1969)<br />
  13. 13. Saturday with Claire, Your Average Tween . . .<br />Learned to write her name in Japanese<br />Learned how to make artificial snow<br />Videotaped herself sleeping (11 hrs. worth)<br />Posted her winter break pictures<br />Learned the guitar chords for an Owl City song<br />Showed me how to make Facebook graffiti<br />Downloaded 4 “found” CDs to her phone<br />Chatted with her Aunt Mary in Bangkok<br />Researched Prometheus and Zeus (FINALLY!)<br />
  14. 14. Did You Know 4.0<br />
  15. 15. 1.  Critical Thinking & Problem-solving<br />2.  Collaboration Across Networks & Leading By Influence <br />3. Agility & Adaptability<br />4.  Initiative & Entrepreneurialism<br />5.  Effective Oral & Written Communication<br />6.  Accessing & Analyzing Information<br />7.  Curiosity & Imagination<br />Rigor Redefined: The Seven Survival Skills for Careers, College, and Citizenship<br />Tony Wagner, Harvard Graduate School of Education<br />
  16. 16. Accustomed to instant gratification and “always-on” connection<br />Use the web for 1) extending friendships, 2) interest-driven, self-directed learning, and 3) as a tool for self-expression<br />Constantly connected, creating, and multitasking in a multimedia world—everywhere except in school<br />Less fear and respect for authority—accustomed to learning from peers; want coaching, but only from adults who don’t “talk down” to them <br />Want to make a difference and do interesting/worthwhile work<br />Tony Wagner, Harvard University, 2009<br />What Motivates The “Net” Generation? <br />
  17. 17. The Seven Survival Skills for Careers, College, and Citizenship<br />
  18. 18. Defining RIGOR<br />RIGOR<br />The Frayer Model (Frayer, Frederick & Klausmeier, 1969)<br />
  19. 19. Learning is RELEVANTwhen the student:<br />understands how this information or skill has some application in their life.<br />has an opportunity to follow their own process rather than just learn “the facts.”<br />is not just learning content and skills, but is learning how they learn.<br />
  20. 20. Move students towardgreater RELEVANCE<br />FROM <br />TO<br />Using skills and knowledge in routine school setting.<br />Work as directed by the teacher.<br />Using skills and knowledge for myself in the real world.<br />Figuring out my own approaches.<br />
  21. 21. HOW?The Rigor/Relevance Framework<br />International Center for Leadership in Education<br />Dr. Willard Daggett<br />
  22. 22. “Rigor and Relevance&quot;<br />
  23. 23. RIGOR<br />Evaluation 6.<br />Synthesis 5. <br />Analysis 4.<br />Application 3. <br /> Comprehension 2.<br />Awareness 1.<br />KNOWLEDGE<br />
  24. 24. RELEVANCE<br />Application<br /> 1 2 3 4 5<br />Knowledge in one discipline<br />Apply knowledge across disciplines<br />Apply knowledge to real-world unpredictable situations<br />Apply knowledge in one discipline<br />Apply knowledge to real-world predictable situations<br />
  25. 25. 6<br />5<br />4<br />3<br />2<br />1<br />D<br />C<br />A<br />B<br />Knowledge(Rigor)<br />1 2 3 4 5<br />Application (Relevance)<br />
  26. 26. QUADRANTA<br />Students gather and store bits of knowledge and information. Students are primarily expected to remember or understand this acquired knowledge. <br />C<br />D<br />A<br />B<br />Low Rigor – Low Relevance<br />Teacher Controlled<br />
  27. 27. QUADRANT B<br />Students use acquired knowledge to solve real-world problems, design solutions, and complete work. The greatest level of application is to apply appropriate knowledge to new and unpredictable situations.<br />C<br />D<br />B<br />A<br />Low Rigor – High Relevance<br />Teacher Directed<br />
  28. 28. QUADRANT C<br />Students extend and refine their acquired knowledge to be able to use that knowledge automatically and routinely to analyze and solve problems and to create unique solutions.<br />C<br />D<br />A<br />B<br />High Rigor – Low Relevance<br />Student Controlled<br />
  29. 29. QUADRANT D<br />Students have the competence to think in complex ways and also apply knowledge and skills they have acquired. Even when confronted with perplexing unknowns, students are able to use extensive knowledge and skill to create solutions and take action that further develops their skills and knowledge.<br />D<br />C<br />A<br />B<br />High Rigor – High Relevance<br />Student Directed<br />
  30. 30. 6<br />5<br />4<br />3<br />2<br />1<br />Student and Teacher Roles<br />Students Think and Work<br />In more complex and unscripted settings using higher order thinking skills to solve real world tasks.<br />Students Think<br />In complex ways: analyze, compare, create and evaluate.<br />Students Work<br />To apply knowledge and skills in real world tasks<br />Teachers Work<br />To create and assess learning activities. The student may be a passive learner.<br />Knowledge(Rigor)<br />1 2 3 4 5<br />Application (Relevance)<br />
  31. 31. 6<br />5<br />4<br />3<br />2<br />1<br />Student and Teacher Roles<br />Students Think and Work<br />In more complex and unscripted settings using higher order thinking skills to solve real world tasks.<br />Students Think<br />In complex ways: analyze, compare, create and evaluate.<br />Students Work<br />To apply knowledge and skills in real world tasks<br />Teachers Work<br />To create and assess learning activities. The student may be a passive learner.<br />Knowledge(Rigor)<br />ACTIVITIES<br />1 2 3 4 5<br />Application (Relevance)<br />
  32. 32. 6<br />5<br />4<br />3<br />2<br />1<br />Student and Teacher Roles<br />Students Think and Work<br />In more complex and unscripted settings using higher order thinking skills to solve real world tasks.<br />Students Think<br />In complex ways: analyze, compare, create and evaluate.<br />Students Work<br />To apply knowledge and skills in real world tasks<br />Teachers Work<br />To create and assess learning activities. The student may be a passive learner.<br />Knowledge(Rigor)<br />PROJECTS<br />1 2 3 4 5<br />Application (Relevance)<br />
  33. 33. 6<br />5<br />4<br />3<br />2<br />1<br />Student and Teacher Roles<br />Students Think and Work<br />In more complex and unscripted settings using higher order thinking skills to solve real world tasks.<br />Students Think<br />In complex ways: analyze, compare, create and evaluate.<br />Students Work<br />To apply knowledge and skills in real world tasks<br />Teachers Work<br />To create and assess learning activities. The student may be a passive learner.<br />Knowledge(Rigor)<br />PROBLEMS<br />1 2 3 4 5<br />Application (Relevance)<br />
  34. 34. QUESTION: How do we “appraise” RIGOR in a classroom?<br />Seven Questions<br />What is the purpose of this lesson? <br />Why is this important to learn? <br />In what ways am I challenged to think in this lesson? <br />How will I apply, assess, or communicate what I’ve learned? <br />How will I know how good my work is and how I can improve it? <br />Do I feel respected by other students in this class? <br />Do I feel respected by the teacher in this class?<br />Answer: <br /> In an open dialogue with learning partners.<br />Relationships<br />
  35. 35. Go to Work . . . <br />
  36. 36. Post your work from today on www.wallwisher.com/wall/rigor-wgsd<br />
  37. 37. A Few Cautions . . . <br />Quadrant D –<br />Students Think& Work<br />Outcomes Unpredictable<br />START -<br />with Big Understandings/Essential Questions<br />
  38. 38. KWhat do we/you think we/you know about this subject?<br />WWhat do we/you want or need to know?<br />HHow will you/we go about finding answers to our questions?<br />LWhat are you/we leaning on a daily basis?<br />AHow can we apply concepts, ideas, principles, and skills to other subjects and to our lives beyond the classroom?<br />QWhat questions do we have now?<br />Back Pocket Strategy . . . KWHLAQ <br />
  39. 39. Defining RIGOR<br />RIGOR<br />The Frayer Model (Frayer, Frederick & Klausmeier, 1969)<br />
  40. 40. If you were on trial for teachingRigor, Relevance,and Relationships . . . <br />What evidence would there be to convict you?<br />
  41. 41. Final Thought . . . <br />Two simple questions that canchange your life in 2010<br />
  42. 42. Final Thoughts . . . <br />As a Teacher, What’s Your Sentence?<br />Was I Better Today Than Yesterday?<br />

×