Putting the "User" back in User Experience (Dallas Techfest Edition)

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If you ask an organization "Are you customer centric?" - of course they say "yes", but as you peel back the layers too many organizations have teams of people building software - and the user is nowhere in sight. This talk will go over a number of ways to include users in your product design process, from start to finish. It's time we truly live up to the term "User Experience".

Published in: Design

Putting the "User" back in User Experience (Dallas Techfest Edition)

  1. 1. Putting the User back in User Experience @jeremyjohnson
  2. 2. @jeremyjohnson (yes, we’re hiring)
  3. 3. http://www.slideshare.net/jeremy/presentations
  4. 4. WORKED FOR
  5. 5. WORKED WITH
  6. 6. Uncover user needs, Design great solutions, and build out solutions to launch.
  7. 7. USER EXPERIENCE
  8. 8. we make things for
  9. 9. we make things for http://500px.com/jeremyjohnson/sets/buenos_aires_2012
  10. 10. We work in ecosystems http://500px.com/jeremyjohnson/sets/london_2012
  11. 11. we think visually
  12. 12. We learn through observation http://500px.com/jeremyjohnson/sets/london_2012
  13. 13. we’re curious http://500px.com/jeremyjohnson/sets/london_2012
  14. 14. USER EXPERIENCE
  15. 15. USER EXPERIENCE
  16. 16. Mr. User
  17. 17. Mr. User Software Development Product Decisions “Hey, what’s going on over there?”
  18. 18. “I know the users!” “They’ll love this when we release next year!!”
  19. 19. http://www.amazon.com/The-Inmates-Are-Running-Asylum/dp/0672326140
  20. 20. I’ve got… 2
  21. 21. #1 You don’t really know your customers as well as you think you do (usually)…
  22. 22. #2 If you’re launching twelve months from now, and are not involving your customer, that’s a big gamble…
  23. 23. Getting everything right the first time, is hard.
  24. 24. http://weandthecolor.com/back-to-the-future-poster-trilogy-by-phantom-city-creative/11727
  25. 25. 2000
  26. 26. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Completion 30 March 2000 Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete task-oriented information-oriented Abstract time Interface Design Navigation Design Conception Visual Design Information Design Interaction Design Architecture Functional Specifications Information Content Requirements User Needs Site Objectives User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  27. 27. http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/09/01/think-your-app-is-beautiful-not-without-user-experience-design/
  28. 28. “Beauty is wasted when our products don’t address real user needs in a usable manner” http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/09/01/think-your-app-is-beautiful-not-without-user-experience-design/
  29. 29. http://t.co/vzaW4WSJil
  30. 30. We’re not just painters!
  31. 31. SO MUCH MORE COMPLEX.
  32. 32. UX
  33. 33. User Experience
  34. 34. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Completion 30 March 2000 Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete task-oriented information-oriented Abstract time Interface Design Navigation Design Conception Visual Design Information Design Interaction Design Architecture Functional Specifications Information Content Requirements User Needs Site Objectives User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  35. 35. 2010
  36. 36. We own so much more than the website!
  37. 37. SERVICE DESIGN
  38. 38. #$%!
  39. 39. WOOT
  40. 40. Systems Thinking Ecosystems Service Design
  41. 41. “SEAT AT THE TABLE”
  42. 42. http://www.forbes.com/sites/anthonykosner/2013/11/23/how-design-and-user-experience-translates-to-the-bottom-line/
  43. 43. We’ve #WON
  44. 44. http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/04/design-can-drive-exceptional-returns-for-shareholders/
  45. 45. It’s not that easy.
  46. 46. There are still 100s of companies that make revenue off software in the $100s of millions that don’t have a user experience team.
  47. 47. “The problem from a user experience perspective is that enterprise systems are generally procured and implemented with the focus purely on solving problems for the business with little attention paid to who the users are and how they want to work.” http://www.foolproof.co.uk/thinking/the-user-experience-of-enterprise-technology/
  48. 48. Solving Problems by Automating Solutions
  49. 49. Is it harder than doing it manually? (I didn’t say “is it easy?”) https://www.flickr.com/photos/33989236@N00/4214027902/
  50. 50. software users have raised the bar their expectations have changed.
  51. 51. Sunday. Monday.
  52. 52. “We’re focusing on User Experience”
  53. 53. “We’re focusing on User Experience” I hired a UX guy! (or gal)
  54. 54. # of developers # of UX designers
  55. 55. # of developers # of UX designers
  56. 56. UX Magic
  57. 57. UX is complex. UX is everywhere. UX is business.
  58. 58. 2015
  59. 59. forgetting…
  60. 60. UX is complex. UX is everywhere. UX is business. UX is for people.
  61. 61. “users”
  62. 62. “users” “people”
  63. 63. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Completion 30 March 2000 Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete task-oriented information-oriented Abstract time Interface Design Navigation Design Conception Visual Design Information Design Interaction Design Architecture Functional Specifications Information Content Requirements User Needs Site Objectives User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  64. 64. “user needs”
  65. 65. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Completion 30 March 2000 Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete task-oriented information-oriented Abstract time Interface Design Navigation Design Conception Visual Design Information Design Interaction Design Architecture Functional Specifications Information Content Requirements User Needs Site Objectives User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  66. 66. What UX isn’t https://medium.com/@jamieskella/what-ux-isnt-dee0436a194d
  67. 67. Making informed and intelligent design decisions means the inclusion of user research and usability testing. Good design requires a deep understanding of your target demographic, only attained through quality data, being a result of unbiased research and testing. Designing for yourself is an easy trap to fall into. Even when wielding taste and best practice acknowledgement, doing so is a sure fire way to get it wrong for your target demographic. UX is the consideration of the many aspects of a user’s interactions with a product or service. It’s concern for the relationship between those interactions, which ultimately define a user’s perception of a brand as a whole. …acutely empathize with the audience they’re designing for. … good UX is the result of understanding the customer, seizing technological opportunity, and pursuing simplicity.
  68. 68. http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ux-without-user-research/
  69. 69. User experience cannot exist without users. Creating user interfaces involves intricate and complex decisions. User research is a tool that can help you achieve your goals. Even the most well thought out designs are assumptions until they are tested by real users. Different types of research can answer different types of questions. Know the tools and apply them accordingly. Leaving the user out is not an option. UX - U = X
  70. 70. http://blogs.wsj.com/accelerators/2014/02/19/braden-kowitz-why-you-should-listen-to-the-customer/
  71. 71. Investing in user research is just about the only way to consistently generate a rich stream of data about customer needs and behaviors. As a designer, I can’t live without it. And as data about customers flows through your team, it informs product managers, engineers, and just about everyone else. It forms the foundation of intuitive designs, indispensable products, and successful companies. So what are you waiting for? Go listen to your customers!
  72. 72. http://www.jeffgothelf.com/blog/agile-doesnt-have-a-brain/
  73. 73. “…methodologies like Scrum — have no mechanism for determining if they’re building the right feature and whether that implementation is designed well and/or worth improving.” http://www.jeffgothelf.com/blog/agile-doesnt-have-a-brain/
  74. 74. Let’s talk about Listening to customers
  75. 75. “Hey, I want you to go and understand our user’s needs.”
  76. 76. “I’ve read stories about our users online” Marketing Data / Segmentation / Surveys
  77. 77. “I’ve watched some videos about our users” Focus Groups / Past Usability Studies / Marketing Research
  78. 78. “I’ve seen our users in the lab” Usability Testing / Concept Testing / Customer Councils
  79. 79. “I went to our users and observed them” Contextual Inquires / Field Studies / Interviews
  80. 80. “I understand best practices, and I’m a student of psychology" I have experience / I’m great at what I do
  81. 81. aka Shut up, I’m a design genius.
  82. 82. Q. Which one accurately answers the question:
  83. 83. “Hey, I want you to go and understand our user’s needs.”
  84. 84. “I want to know them so well, the system we design “just works” for them.”
  85. 85. User Experience
  86. 86. User Experience
  87. 87. Web Design vs. User Experience
  88. 88. User Experience
  89. 89. “Top Job” http://money.cnn.com/pf/best-jobs/2012/snapshots/43.html
  90. 90. “Top Job” http://money.cnn.com/pf/best-jobs/2012/snapshots/43.html
  91. 91. http://www.uxutd.com/
  92. 92. “Give me three skills a ux designer needs today and for the future”
  93. 93. HTML ILLUSTRATOR PHOTOSHOP
  94. 94. “empathy”
  95. 95. http://poetpainter.com/
  96. 96. HARD http://poetpainter.com/ “EASY”
  97. 97. http://poetpainter.com/
  98. 98. “personal significance” “works like I think”
  99. 99. “Hey, I want you to go and understand our user’s needs, wants, and desires.”
  100. 100. You get there by understanding your users.
  101. 101. 5 WAYS Getting to know your users helps YOU.
  102. 102. Learn the unexpected
  103. 103. https://twitter.com/jmspool/statuses/421414065496289280
  104. 104. 1. Business needs data to backup decisions.
  105. 105. 2. Mind-blowing, astonishing, insights.
  106. 106. 3. Something in-between…
  107. 107. Observations will speak volumes for your users.
  108. 108. User Quotes
  109. 109. “I like the idea, but I’d never use this.”
  110. 110. “What I really need is a way to save this for later.”
  111. 111. “I have no idea how to use this, so I just skip that whole step”
  112. 112. “I usually just print it out and file it away.”
  113. 113. “I use this because it makes me feel like I’m mastering something”
  114. 114. Affinity Diagramming
  115. 115. Solving the right problems
  116. 116. Product Owner “I know” CEO Designer CMO Developer
  117. 117. Institutional Knowledge
  118. 118. The 8 Monkeys http://speakingofresearch.com/category/news/campus-activism/
  119. 119. http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/making-a-difference/striking-out-als-ice-bucket-challenge-brings-flood-donations-n177896
  120. 120. The 8 Monkeys http://speakingofresearch.com/category/news/campus-activism/
  121. 121. Institutional Knowledge
  122. 122. Go observe, talk to, and interact with your users! Get first hand experience of your user’s problems!
  123. 123. Show you care
  124. 124. #1 reaction when observing users of business-to-business software?
  125. 125. “Wow, you care about us? I thought we were abandoned to the depths of bad software!”
  126. 126. + Signed longer contracts +Bought new software + Excited user base
  127. 127. #1 reaction when observing users.
  128. 128. Hugs.
  129. 129. You’re the expert
  130. 130. “Hey, who do I go to, I have a question about what we should do here?”
  131. 131. Amount you know about your users Number of questions you’ll get about the direction of your product
  132. 132. “SEAT AT THE TABLE”
  133. 133. + You know what will set you apart + Quotes are Business Ammo + You understand the problems + You’re users love you + You’re now the expert
  134. 134. Design Research (or User Research)
  135. 135. https://twitter.com/jmspool/statuses/409433591643246592
  136. 136. https://twitter.com/userfocus/status/519437111540584449
  137. 137. Usability Testing vs. User Research
  138. 138. Today 6 months 3 years
  139. 139. http://www.fastcodesign.com/3031942/google-ventures-on-8-shortcuts-for-better-faster-design-research
  140. 140. http://www.slideshare.net/jeremy/failing-fast-learning-along-the-way-big-design-2013
  141. 141. 8 Design Research practices to kick start your user knowledge!
  142. 142. Participatory Design Contextual Inquiries Affinity Diagramming Understand Design Refine Persona Development Concept Validation Workflow Modeling KANO Feature Prioritization Card Sorting 404 testing User Journals / Diaries
  143. 143. http://michaelvhurley.com/2013/01/04/my-worthless-degree/
  144. 144. Psychology, cognitive science, etc…
  145. 145. Why did the associate damage his thumb? Because his thumb got caught in the conveyor. Why did his thumb get caught in the conveyor? Because he was chasing his bag, which was on a running conveyor. Why did he chase his bag? Because he placed his bag on the conveyor, but it then turned-on by surprise Why was his bag on the conveyor? Because he used the conveyor as a table So, the likely root cause of the associate’s damaged thumb is that he simply needed a table, there wasn’t one around, so he used a conveyor as a table. To eliminate further safety incidences, we need to provide tables at the appropriate stations or provide portable, light tables for the associates to use and also update and a greater focus on safety training. Also, look into preventative maintenance standard work. http://www.shmula.com/jeff-bezos-5-why-exercise-root-cause-analysis-cause-and-effect-ishikawa-lean-thinking-six-sigma/987/
  146. 146. http://www.uxmatters.com/mt/archives/2009/07/laddering-a-research-interview-technique-for-uncovering-core-values.php
  147. 147. Contextual Inquiries
  148. 148. A contextual inquiry interview is usually structured as an approximately two-hour, one-on-one interaction in which the researcher watches the user do their normal activities and discusses what they see with the user. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contextual_inquiry
  149. 149. Observing Users.
  150. 150. Persona Development
  151. 151. Primary Persona David Corporate Employee, 40 yrs old Health Conscious “I workout a couple times a week, and want to make sure I’m as healthy as I can be” Number of doctor visits a year: 5 Years without major health issue: 8 About David: Experience: Health Motivators: Goals: Technology Adoption: 90% 55% 100% Ideal State: David’s Edge: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum metus a, luctus dolor. Cras est dui, lobortis et nisi quis, viverra vehicula purus. Vestibulum ultrices ut eros a egestas. Phasellus egestas ligula sit amet nulla vehicula egestas. Maecenas interdum porta faucibus. Sed id mauris ac turpis pretium pretium. Praesent euismod vitae sem vitae tincidunt. Mauris interdum. • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur • adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. • Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum • metus a, luctus dolor. Cras est dui, lobortis et • nisi quis, viverra vehicula purus. Vestibulum • ]ultrices ut eros a egestas. Phasellus egestas Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum metus a, luctus dolor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum metus a, luctus dolor. Cras est dui, lobortis et nisi quis, viverra vehicula purus. Vestibulum ultrices ut eros a egestas. Phasellus egestas ligula sit amet nulla vehicula egestas. Maecenas interdum porta faucibus. Sed id mauris ac turpis pretium pretium. Praesent euismod vitae sem vitae tincidunt. Mauris interdum. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum metus a, luctus dolor. Cras est dui, lobortis et nisi quis, viverra vehicula purus. Vestibulum ultrices ut eros a egestas. Phasellus egestas ligula sit amet nulla vehicula egestas. Maecenas interdum porta faucibus. Sed id mauris ac turpis pretium pretium. Praesent euismod.
  152. 152. http://blog.mailchimp.com/new-mailchimp-user-persona-research/
  153. 153. As a user… Jane needs to…
  154. 154. Concept Validation
  155. 155. User-centered design can be characterized as a multi-stage problem solving process that not only requires designers to analyze and foresee how users are likely to use a product, but also to test the validity of their assumptions with regard to user behavior in real world tests with actual users. Such testing is necessary as it is often very difficult for the designers of a product to understand intuitively what a first-time user of their design experiences, and what each user's learning curve may look like. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User-centered_design
  156. 156. “Starbucks Testing”
  157. 157. x x
  158. 158. Core team makes decisions Done! the core team
  159. 159. Affinity Diagramming
  160. 160. Participatory Design
  161. 161. “Participatory design aims to bring users into the design process by facilitating conversations through the creation and completion of a wide range of activities.” http://designmind.frogdesign.com/blog/bringing-users-into-your-process-through-participatory-design.html
  162. 162. http://www.slideshare.net/frogdesign/bringing-users-into-your-process-through-participatory-design
  163. 163. Card Sorting
  164. 164. http://www.optimalworkshop.com/treejack.htm
  165. 165. 404 testing
  166. 166. Comics, fast! www.ubercomics.com Want comics delivered to your home, fast? Download our app!
  167. 167. The Wizard Of Oz Techniques For Social Prototyping – You don’t need to build everything at first. You can be the man behind the curtain. Krieger says him and Systrom tested an early version of a feature which would notify you when friends joined the service. Instead of building it out, they manually sent people notifications “like a human bot” saying ‘your friend has joined.’ It turned out not to be useful. “We wrote zero lines of Python, so we had zero lines to throw away.” http://techcrunch.com/2012/11/30/instagram-co-founder-mike-kriegers-8-principles-for-building-products-people-want/ - Mike Krieger, Instagram’s founder
  168. 168. http://jeremyjohnsononline.com/2012/12/19/answering-the-question-would-they-use-it-before-you-build-it/
  169. 169. http://www.leemunroe.com/lean-product-development-validate-feature-ideas/
  170. 170. It was an MVP (Minimal Viable Product). I skipped a bunch of features I figured I would implement later. First I wanted to see if people would use it and how they would use it. (...) Implementing user accounts (in Rails) would take me 2 weekends of work; registration, accounts, saving lists, removing lists, tracking, designing screens, edge cases etc. I didn’t want to spend the time if it turned out no one signed up so I ran an experiment. I dropped in a link on the top of the page that said “Sign up to save multiple lists.” and tracked the number of clicks it got with Mixpanel. http://www.leemunroe.com/lean-product-development-validate-feature-ideas/
  171. 171. http://www.leemunroe.com/lean-product-development-validate-feature-ideas/
  172. 172. User Journals / Diaries
  173. 173. “In interviews, it can be difficult to get a sense of behavior over time because you have to rely on the participant’s memory of past activities or circumstances, and artifacts can only do so much to prompt that.” http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/jumpstart-design-research-with-a-diary-study/
  174. 174. http://www.slideshare.net/jaremfan/the-goodness-of-diary-studies
  175. 175. http://www.trackyourhappiness.org/
  176. 176. “46.9 percent of the time the responders said their minds were wandering when the iPhone rang to query their thoughts.” http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2010/11/11/iphone-users-report-that-daydreams-make-them-sad/
  177. 177. 8 Design Research practices to kick start your user knowledge!
  178. 178. Rockstars!
  179. 179. Tomer Sharon User Experience Researcher at Google Search https://plus.google.com/+TomerSharon/about
  180. 180. http://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/lean-user-research/
  181. 181. Google I/O 2014 - Perfectly executing the wrong plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TJTbRw4ri8
  182. 182. Research + Lean Startup
  183. 183. Leisa Reichelt Head of User Research at the Government Digital Service in the Cabinet Office http://www.disambiguity.com/
  184. 184. http://www.disambiguity.com/help-joy-help-you/
  185. 185. https://twitter.com/leisa
  186. 186. https://userresearch.blog.gov.uk/
  187. 187. Big Government + Empathy
  188. 188. 1. Research with project teams, not for them 2. Research with users, as opposed to http://inside.mygov.scot/2014/09/09/five-principles-user-research/ carrying out research on users 3. Usability testing should be (as) light, fast and frequent (as possible) 4. Research practices and contexts, as well as use 5. Research needs to be visible and shared quickly
  189. 189. Peter Eckert Co-Founder & CXO http://projekt202.com/
  190. 190. 10+ Years
  191. 191. Enterprise / Complex Software + Design Research
  192. 192. Last…
  193. 193. https://www.behance.net/gallery/PRESENTATION-User-Research/4890075
  194. 194. https://www.behance.net/gallery/PRESENTATION-User-Research/4890075
  195. 195. Thanks! @jeremyjohnson
  196. 196. “If you’re not involving your users, you’re not a User Experience Designer” #techfest #designresearch via: @jeremyjohnson Who needs users! I’m a design genius! @jeremyjohnson doesn’t know what he’s talking about #iknowbest #forgetusers #techfest
  197. 197. Thanks! Questions? Jeremy Johnson Director of User Experience @ @jeremyjohnson 214-228-2894 .com @projekt202 jeremy.johnson@projekt202.com

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