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Top Three Modern Product Trends

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Top Three Modern Product Trends

  1. top three modern 
 product trends #1 design as an investment #2 product decisions should be based on evidence #3 empowering small teams
  2. @jeremyjohnson Director of User Experience, Dallas Office jeremy.johnson@projekt202.com
  3. WORKED FOR
  4. “Uncover user needs, 
 Design great solutions, 
 and build to launch.”
  5. USER EXPERIENCE?
  6. User-centered design can be characterized as a multi-stage problem solving process that not only requires designers to analyze and foresee how users are likely to use a product, but also to test the validity of their assumptions with regard to user behavior in real world tests with actual users. Such testing is necessary as it is often very difficult for the designers of a product to understand intuitively what a first-time user of their design experiences, and what each user's learning curve may look like. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User-centered_design User-Centered Design
  7. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete Abstract time Conception Completion Functional Specifications Content Requirements Interaction Design Information Architecture Visual Design Information Design Interface Design Navigation Design Site Objectives User Needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. task-oriented information-oriented 30 March 2000 © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  8. 15 YEARS Design Research User Experience Visual Design Interaction Design Design Thinking User Validation Usability
  9. http://www.brownwebdesign.com/blog/dont-be-in-a-rush-to-be-a-specialist
  10. http://www.inuse.se/blogg/ux-mognaden-i-sverige-2014-och-hur-du-tar-dig-till-nasta-niva-inuseful/
  11. Companies that invest in Design perform better than those that don’t. Trend #1
  12. VALUE
  13. http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/04/design-can-drive-exceptional-returns-for-shareholders/
  14. https://twitter.com/DesignUXUI/statuses/563738777596608513
  15. “At Nike, a large and well-resourced design function reports directly to CEO, Mark Parker, who early in his tenure was a designer himself.” “Using human-centered design methods, inspiration for the company’s signature products is drawn directly from its cadre of famous and not-so- famous practicing athletes, with whom the designers directly interact to devise authentic performance innovations and style updates.” http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/04/design-can-drive-exceptional-returns-for-shareholders/
  16. "The datacenter has not yet had it’s ‘iPhone moment’, but it will soon. The user interface on the iPhone transformed how we interact with mobile devices. As a company, we’re going to make that happen in the datacenter." https://mesosphere.com/2014/12/03/mesosphere-acquires-h1-studios/
  17. Sunday. Monday.
  18. ROI
  19. http://www.humanfactors.com/coolstuff/roi.asp
  20. http://www.sapcampaigns.de/us/UX_Calculator/ Productivity | Training | Data Quality | Solution Accuracy ROI
  21. GETTING IN THE GAME
  22. http://experience.sap.com/designservices/
  23. http://experience.sap.com/designservices/approach
  24. http://techcrunch.com/2014/10/02/adaptive-path-acquired-by-capital-one/
  25. https://www.capitalonelabs.com/#/news
  26. http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/blog/morning_call/2014/11/apple-cofounder-applauds-capital-ones-new.html
  27. http://www.ibm.com/design/?lnk=msdDS-daib-usen
  28. http://www.ibm.com/design/?lnk=msdDS-daib-usen
  29. “IBM Design emerges as the new standard-setter for user experience. Hundreds of designers and interface developers start to transform the development process through deeper understanding of the people who use IBM products and how they use them.” http://www.ibm.com/smarterplanet/us/en/innovation_explanations/article/phil_gilbert.html
  30. IBM Design Thinking
  31. After the TV Source: @kpcb @johnmaeda @heif #DesignInTech http://kpcb.com/design Before the TV After the PC and Laptop In the age of Mobile ... Tech is no longer for Tech-ies, because Mobile is for Everybody (Right) Now The smartphone revolution brought design’s value into the foreground. We want to do in our palm, while walking, what we used to do on a big screen while sitting down at a desk. The interaction design challenges presented by that shift are huge. 21
  32. Source: @kpcb @johnmaeda #DesignInTech Text 22 8AM 4PM once in the morning once in the evening User Experience matters so much, because we are Experiencing so much. A pain point can become a “pain plane” on mobile. That’s a lot of ouch. 150 unlocks = checking your phone every 5.6 minutes one interaction, one “ouch” just two ouch points The mobile paradigm should be thought of as “the always with you and in your face” paradigm. For that reason, a bad design will not just hurt once, but the hundreds of times you might use the bad design in a single day. That’s a lot of unnecessary “ouches.” http://www.kpcb.com/internet-trends
  33. Design is a cost. To leverage design successfully in tech, don’t spray design on at the end. B E G I N N I N G M I D D L E E N D D E S I G N AT T H E V E RY E N D ( o r “ C O S M E T I C S U R G E RY ” ) D E S I G N A S “ B A K E D - I N ” $ $ $ $ $ DES I GN Start with design, rather than just end with it. an investment. Source: @kpcb @johnmaeda @wsj #DesignInTech http://blogs.wsj.com/accelerators/2014/02/21/john-maeda-three-principles-for-using-design-successfully/ 13
  34. Product decisions should be based on evidence. (and design research is here to help you) Trend #2
  35. I know what to do! We need to build X with Y features based on my years of experience here at the company!
  36. Will you design this for me? Sure, I’ll use this verbatim!
  37. Will you design this for me? *&!@*(^
  38. Will you build this for me? Sure, I’ll use this verbatim!
  39. Will you design this for me? Sure, I’ll use this verbatim!
  40. http://www.mindtheproduct.com/
  41. http://www.mindtheproduct.com/2014/11/leisa-reichelt-changing-organisations-to-improve-products/ “…highlights the importance of reducing the distance between the people designing the product and making decisions about them and the people who use them, through increased research and team participation in that research.”
  42. DATA
  43. Creating a steady stream of data. Qualitative Quantitative
  44. Qualitative Quantitative Analytics A/B Testing Clickstream 404 Testing Surveys “Voice of Customer” NPS Experian Contextual Inquiries Personas Journey Maps Workflow Diagrams Affinity Diagramming Validation Testing Usability Testing
  45. Qualitative Quantitative Analytics A/B Testing Clickstream 404 Testing Surveys “Voice of Customer” NPS Experian Contextual Inquiries Personas Journey Maps Workflow Diagrams Affinity Diagramming Validation Testing Usability Testing
  46. Quantitative Analytics A/B Testing Clickstream 404 Testing Surveys “Voice of Customer” NPS Experian
  47. Insights & Opportunities Data Analysis Revealing Reality Observe to understand Contextual InquiriesStakeholder Interviews We observe your users in their “habitats,” whether that’s an office, a home, or a shopping mall. We have a proven methodology that uncovers what drives your users, so we can create innovation that fits their lives.
  48. “I read a user manual once” “I’ve watched some videos” “I’ve sat with actual users” “I read the Marketing Research” “I once had that job” “I’ve had users in the lab”
  49. http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ux-without-user-research/
  50. User experience cannot exist without users. Creating user interfaces involves intricate and complex decisions. User research is a tool that can help you achieve your goals. Even the most well thought out designs are assumptions until they are tested by real users. Different types of research can answer different types of questions. Know the tools and apply them accordingly. Leaving the user out is not an option. UX - U = X
  51. http://blogs.wsj.com/accelerators/2014/02/19/braden-kowitz-why-you-should-listen-to-the-customer/
  52. “Investing in user research is just about the only way to consistently generate a rich stream of data about customer needs and behaviors. As a designer, I can’t live without it. And as data about customers flows through your team, it informs product managers, engineers, and just about everyone else. It forms the foundation of intuitive designs, indispensable products, and successful companies. So what are you waiting for? Go listen to your customers!” - Ventures
  53. http://www.gv.com/sprint/
  54. “Meeting ever-increasing consumer expectations requires senior executives to place design at the center of business strategy.” “What a user-centered approach enables companies to do is to take insights into the consumer decision journey and the marketplace and convert them into products and services customers actually want… 
 In the new competitive marketplace, designing “usable” is just table stakes. Customers now expect products and services to be not only usable but also useful and desirable.” http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/marketing_sales/what_every_executive_needs_to_know_about_design
  55. “Users should be a part of the design process from the very beginning to help validate concepts and refine final direction. Your team needs to be open to experimenting and taking risks and then quickly learning and iterating…” http://www.mckinsey.com/insights/marketing_sales/what_every_executive_needs_to_know_about_design
  56. “A success indicator for an entrepreneur is not about how hard you work, it's about how well you know your customers” - Ben Horowitz
  57. http://designmind.frogdesign.com/blog/sxsw-lean-startup-for-big-brands.html
  58. SXSW: Lean Startup for Big Brands “…In actuality, there is never a guarantee that customers are going to get excited when a new product is brought to market. In our work, we employ a number of tools to eliminate that uncertainty as much as possible, often through consumer research or validation testing…” “…while a startup has nowhere to go but up, known companies risk brand erosion with the release of a substandard product to the market. We encourage clients to distill innovations to the most valuable, tangible, and deliverable attributes for initial launch but not to compromise on the intended experience… …Overtime, the company can add features and functionality, but the overall experience begins and remains excellent.” http://designmind.frogdesign.com/blog/sxsw-lean-startup-for-big-brands.html
  59. “I can launch this app in three months” “This solution will launch in 18 months” vs.
  60. Opportunities Matrix Personas Scenario Design Journey Maps Contextual Inquiries KANO Study A/B Testing Concept Validation Prototyping
  61. “The company, for example, did a study of 8,292 people in eight cities, examining morning routines.” “With this data in hand, Ikea came up with a freestanding mirror that has a rack on the back for hanging clothes and jewelry. The Knapper…” “Even surveying 8,292 people doesn’t always get you the right answer. The problem is that people lie. Ydholm puts it more delicately. “Sometimes we are not aware about how we behave,” he says, “and therefore we can say things that maybe are not the reality. Or it could be that we consciously or unconsciously express something because we want to stand out as a better person. That’s very human to do it like that.”” http://fortune.com/ikea-world-domination/
  62. I have some ideas… But I need to validate them with our users so that I can make an informed decision.
  63. Small, autonomous product teams can really get your organization moving. Trend #3
  64. AGILE
  65. “Agile methods like Scrum and XP both rely on a close and collaborative relationship and continual interaction with the customer – the people who are paying for the software and who are going to use the system.” http://swreflections.blogspot.com/2012/02/agiles-customer-problem.html
  66. http://scaledagileframework.com/ux
  67. http://scaledagileframework.com/ux
  68. http://scaledagileframework.com/ux “…a small, centralized UX design team who provides the basic design standards and preliminary mock-ups for each UI, but the teams have team-based UX implementation experts for the implementation.”
  69. “…methodologies like Scrum — have no mechanism for determining if they’re building the right feature and whether that implementation is designed well and/or worth improving.” http://www.jeffgothelf.com/blog/agile-doesnt-have-a-brain/
  70. MVP
  71. “MVP should be a polished slice of your experience, that meets the basic needs of your customers. By launching you’ll learn what they do with your product - and use that learning to prioritize enhancements going forward”
  72. TEAMS
  73. Co-Located, autonomous, metrics driven
  74. A throwback to their days with Jeff Bezos at Amazon, projects are assigned to "two pizza teams," groups of engineers small enough for them to be fed on two large pies. "We want the team to be flat and allow everyone to communicate with each other," Rajaraman says. http://www.fastcompany.com/1811934/walmartlabs-brings-two-pizza-team-startup-culture-walmart-empire
  75. Designers Developers Product Owner (mini-CEO) Project Manager
  76. # of developers # of UX designers
  77. # of developers # of UX designers
  78. # of developers # of UX designers
  79. https://twitter.com/jjg/status/565613568314572801
  80. Devs rather write good code.
  81. Devs like Designers after they get their first taste.
  82. Shipping Software Based on Priority to achieve metrics To the Right Customers To Meet their Goals. Research what to build… Learn from Shipping…
  83. “Center of Excellence” UX Leadership Research Enterprise Design Language
  84. METRICS
  85. http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-01-10/how-ihops-new-menu-design-gets-customers-to-spend-more
  86. http://www.slideshare.net/jysimon/product-tankparis-jysimon16may2013
  87. Sign-up Abandonment Getting First Task Repeat Usage Duration in App Conversion Traffic
  88. “fail fast” is actually better framed as “experiment fast.” The most effective innovators succeed through experimentation. http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/fail-fast-fail-often-an-interview-with-victor-lombardi/ - Victor Lombardi
  89. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freeman_Dyson Freeman Dyson
  90. Freeman John Dyson FRS is an English American theoretical physicist and mathematician, famous for his work in quantum electrodynamics, solid-state physics, astronomy and nuclear engineering.
  91. “Say something about failure in experiments or businesses or anything else. 
 What's the value of failure?” http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/6.02/dyson.html?pg=7&topic= 1998
  92. “You can't possibly get a good technology going without an enormous number of failures. It's a universal rule. If you look at bicycles, there were thousands of weird models built and tried before they found the one that really worked. You could never design a bicycle theoretically. Even now, after we've been building them for 100 years, it's very difficult to understand just why a bicycle works - it's even difficult to formulate it as a mathematical problem. But just by trial and error, we found out how to do it, and the error was essential. The same is true of airplanes.”
  93. “So you're saying just go ahead and try stuff and you'll sort out the right way.”
 “That's what nature did. And it's almost always true in technology. That's why computers never really took off until they built them small.”
 

  94. “Why is small good?”
 “Because it's cheaper and faster, and you can make many more. Speed is the most important thing - to be able to try something out on a small scale quickly.”
  95. “Fail fast.”
 “Yes. These big projects are guaranteed to fail because you never have time to fix everything.” 1998
  96. “fail fast” is actually better framed as “experiment fast.” The most effective innovators succeed through experimentation. http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/fail-fast-fail-often-an-interview-with-victor-lombardi/ - Victor Lombardi
  97. Design is an investment, and has proven success
 Product decisions should be based on evidence
 Small teams should work together to improve metrics
  98. How to start…
  99. 1. Determine a product-market fit by seeking signals from communities of users. 2. Identify behavioral insights by conducting ethnographic research. 3. Sketch a product strategy by synthesizing complex research data into simple insights. 4. Polish the product details using visual representations to simplify complex ideas.
  100. ““Before we deal with world domination, let’s back up.” I help people walk back up the ladder to get to: Who’s the user? What problem are you solving for the user? Does your proposed solution actually solve that problem— and how can you answer that? Then, how can you answer that faster?” http://how.co/the-right-questions-to-ask-before-you-build-software/
  101. People + Technology
  102. Insights & Opportunities Data Analysis Revealing Reality Observe to understand Contextual InquiriesStakeholder Interviews We observe your users in their “habitats,” whether that’s an office, a home, or a shopping mall. We have a proven methodology that uncovers what drives your users, so we can create innovation that fits their lives.
  103. Generate New Concepts User-Validated Concept Validate Concepts with Users We put insights into action, developing concepts for innovation based on what we understand about your audience. We create a grounded vision for the product and design principles to guide it through the process of being designed and built. Focused Innovation Bring the solution into focus 1
  104. Building & Evolving Design & develop user-centered software Launch Analytics & Digital Marketing Development Testing Iterative Releases User Stories Our cross-functional team of designers and developers works together to iteratively design, build, test, and validate features that scale and evolve to meet tomorrow's challenges. Design
  105. http://poetpainter.com/ Functional (Useful) Reliable Usable Convenient Pleasurable Meaning
  106. http://poetpainter.com/ Functional (Useful) Reliable Usable Convenient Pleasurable Meaning
  107. http://poetpainter.com/ Functional (Useful) Reliable Usable Convenient Pleasurable Meaning Experience Driven Technology Driven
  108. KEY TAKEAWAYS
  109. “The software design and development process has changed for the better”
  110. “Getting everything right the first time, is hard.”
  111. “UX is a robust methodology, while relatively new, is tested with success”
  112. “You don’t really know your customers as well as you think you do…”
  113. “User Experience has a large number of methods to help create empathy and data for products teams”
  114. “Empathy and understanding of users is key in product success”
  115. “If you’re launching twelve months from now, 
 and are not involving your customer, that’s a big gamble…”
  116. “Software is always evolving, and a mix of qualitative research, market research, and analytics are needed to improve and prioritize.”
  117. “Talking with one user* is better than talking with no users.”
  118. “A well-made product is not enough. A successful product must meet the needs and aspirations of its users” IDC Report Building Experience-Driven software: Insights for Modern Application Development

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