Top Trends In Product Design: Outcomes, Understanding Customers, and Building 
for Experiments

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While some organizations are still grappling with moving to Agile or hiring their first UX Designer, others are moving fast to embrace methods that have been proven to generate success. Are you still creating product roadmaps? Are you investing in understanding your customers? Are your technology platforms built for experimentation? Come hear how organizations are achieving success, and how you can help your organization move in the right direction.

This presentation was originally given at the Big Design Conference in Dallas, TX on 9/19/2015

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Top Trends In Product Design: Outcomes, Understanding Customers, and Building 
for Experiments

  1. 1. Top Trends In Product Design: Outcomes, Understanding Customers, and Building 
 for Experiments
  2. 2. @jeremyjohnson Director of User Experience
  3. 3. WORKED FOR
  4. 4. www.projekt202.com
  5. 5. “Uncover user needs, 
 Design great solutions, 
 and build to launch.”
  6. 6. “A well-made product is not enough. A successful product must meet the needs and aspirations of its users” IDC Report Building Experience-Driven software: Insights for Modern Application Development
  7. 7. I’m listening to @jeremyjohnson - Trends in Product Design: Outcomes, Understanding Customers, and Building 
 for Experiments #bigd15 Tweet me
  8. 8. 2015 $280 Million 2006 $1 Billion http://www.dallasnews.com/business/columnists/mitchell-schnurman/20140426-buyout-blahs-at-sabre-7-years-and-a-lot-more-debt.ece 1996 Launched
  9. 9. 2015 $120 Million 2005 $1.2 Billion http://skift.com/2014/12/16/bravofly-to-acquire-lastminute-com-for-120-million/ 1998 Launched
  10. 10. WHY?
  11. 11. Focusing on the product…
  12. 12. Focusing on projects vs. Outcomes
 Not involving customers vs. Being customer centric
 Tech as support vs. Tech as experiments Product Design Issues…
  13. 13. http://www.inuse.se/blogg/ux-mognaden-i-sverige-2014-och-hur-du-tar-dig-till-nasta-niva-inuseful/
  14. 14. UX “VP” “Director” “CXO” “Manager” “SVP”
  15. 15. Product + UX + Development
  16. 16. “Where are all the good Product Owners?” CEO
  17. 17. http://www.meetup.com/ProductTank-DFW/events/224616146/
  18. 18. San Francisco
  19. 19. New York
  20. 20. Seattle
  21. 21. Focusing on projects vs. Outcomes
 Not involving customers vs. Being customer centric
 Tech as support vs. Tech as experiments Product Design Issues…
  22. 22. Not focused on the right things Slow, inflexible technology U X
  23. 23. I need to care about…? http://jessicaivins.net/blog/20130311-What-I-Learned-From-Teaching-UX-Part-1.html
  24. 24. http://www.brownwebdesign.com/blog/dont-be-in-a-rush-to-be-a-specialist
  25. 25. http://www.mindtheproduct.com/2011/10/what-exactly-is-a-product-manager/http://jessicaivins.net/blog/20130311-What-I-Learned-From-Teaching-UX-Part-1.html UX In the Middle? Product in the Middle?
  26. 26. Product Managers are Taking my Job: Confessions of a UX Designer http://unbreakablepo.com/page/2/
  27. 27. A Process for Empathetic Product Design “The discipline of product management is shifting from an external focus on the market, or an internal focus on technology, to an empathetic focus on people.” https://hbr.org/2015/04/a-process-for-empathetic-product-design
  28. 28. UX Designers make great product owners!
  29. 29. Design is a cost. To leverage design successfully in tech, don’t spray design on at the end. B E G I N N I N G M I D D L E E N D D E S I G N AT T H E V E RY E N D ( o r “ C O S M E T I C S U R G E RY ” ) D E S I G N A S “ B A K E D - I N ” $ $ $ $ $ DES I GN Start with design, rather than just end with it. an investment. Source: @kpcb @johnmaeda @wsj #DesignInTech http://blogs.wsj.com/accelerators/2014/02/21/john-maeda-three-principles-for-using-design-successfully/ 13
  30. 30. http://poetpainter.com/ Functional (Useful) Reliable Usable Convenient Pleasurable Meaning Experience Driven Technology Driven
  31. 31. http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/04/design-can-drive-exceptional-returns-for-shareholders/
  32. 32. https://twitter.com/DesignUXUI/statuses/563738777596608513
  33. 33. “At Nike, a large and well-resourced design function reports directly to CEO, Mark Parker, who early in his tenure was a designer himself.” “Using human-centered design methods, inspiration for the company’s signature products is drawn directly from its cadre of famous and not-so- famous practicing athletes, with whom the designers directly interact to devise authentic performance innovations and style updates.” http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/04/design-can-drive-exceptional-returns-for-shareholders/
  34. 34. UX Designers make great product owners!
  35. 35. Doesn’t Really Matter We’re all here to kick ass…
  36. 36. https://twitter.com/jeremyjohnson/status/642353184313225217
  37. 37. A product can’t be successful without business, design, and technology all moving in the right direction via/ @jeremyjohnson #bigd15 Tweet me
  38. 38. Outcomes > Plans Trend #1
  39. 39. https://medium.com/managing-digital-products/so-you-want-to-manage-a-product-c664ba7e5138
  40. 40. Marty Cagan
  41. 41. http://www.mindtheproduct.com/2015/09/video-the-root-causes-of-product-failure-by-marty-cagan/
  42. 42. Roadmaps
  43. 43. Just got our roadmap from the c-team! I’m super excited about making sure all these features get put into my product! #1
  44. 44. Typical Roadmap features… features… features…
  45. 45. http://www.slideshare.net/jysimon/product-tankparis-jysimon16may2013
  46. 46. METRICS
  47. 47. http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-01-10/how-ihops-new-menu-design-gets-customers-to-spend-more
  48. 48. Sign-up Abandonment Getting First Task Repeat Usage Duration in App Incentives Engagement Gathering Additional Data
  49. 49. •Incentivized to deliver a feature (not the outcome) •No ownership in solving the problem (feature has been decided) •No way to really test and learn With Roadmaps…
  50. 50. We need to reduce the onboarding time for our product. I’m super excited about running some experiments to achieve this goal! #2
  51. 51. •Judged on the outcome •Owns the solution •Has the ability to experiment to the right solution With Scorecards…
  52. 52. “We are stubborn on vision. We are flexible on details.” - Jeff Bezos
  53. 53. http://waitbutwhy.com/2015/08/how-and-why-spacex-will-colonize-mars.html
  54. 54. Facebook's mission “connect the world”
  55. 55. “You’re not managing a product. You’re managing the problem it solves.” “Your job is to deeply understand the problem that your product aims to solve then chase the moving goal of solving every nuance of that problem.” So you want to manage a product? https://medium.com/managing-digital-products/so-you-want-to-manage-a-product-c664ba7e5138
  56. 56. “fail fast” is actually better framed as “experiment fast.” The most effective innovators succeed through experimentation. http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/fail-fast-fail-often-an-interview-with-victor-lombardi/ - Victor Lombardi
  57. 57. http://www.slideshare.net/jeremy/
  58. 58. I’m super excited about running some experiments to achieve this goal! Passion MetricsTest&Learn
  59. 59. A Deep Understanding of the Customers is key. Trend #2
  60. 60. http://www.slideshare.net/jeremy/
  61. 61. Are you doing research? Are you a customer centric organization?
  62. 62. “I read a user manual once” “I’ve watched some videos” “I’ve sat with actual users” “I read the Marketing Research” “I once had that job” “I’ve had users in the lab”
  63. 63. Revealing Reality Observe to understand We observe your users in their “habitats,” whether that’s an o home, or a shopping mall. We have a proven methodology that uncovers what drives your users, so we can create innovation that fits their lives. Stakeholder Interviews Contextual Inquiries Data Analysis Insights & Opportunities
  64. 64. Focused Innovation Bring the solution into focus We put insights into action, developing concepts for innovation based on what we understand about your audience. We create a grounded vision for the product and design principles to guide it through the process of being designed and built. Generate New Concepts Validate Concepts with Users User-Validated Concept
  65. 65. Building & Evolving Design & develop user-centered software Our cross-functional team of designers and developers works together to iteratively design, build, test, and validate features that scale and evolve to meet tomorrow's challenges. User Stories Design Development Testing Iterative Releases Analytics & Digital Marketing Launch
  66. 66. Opportunities Matrix Personas Scenario Design Journey Maps Contextual Inquiries KANO Study A/B Testing Concept Validation Prototyping
  67. 67. UX has moved from a practice of creating screens, to creating a shared understanding of your customer’s behavior via/ @jeremyjohnson #bigd15 Tweet me
  68. 68. Do you think of UX as… Tools Paint Strategy Process Photoshop Sketch HTML Looks Good! Make it blue. On Brand! What should we build? What do our customers need? Where can we be effective? What is your hypothesis? What methods do we use? How are we synthesizing the data? Patterns Buttons! Interactions flows
  69. 69. Do you think of UX as… Tools Paint Strategy Process Photoshop Sketch HTML Looks Good! Make it blue. On Brand! What should we build? What do our customers need? Where can we be effective? What is your hypothesis? What methods do we use? How are we synthesizing the data? Patterns Buttons! Interactions flows
  70. 70. Do you think of UX as… Design Genius Creates Success? The Process of Understanding Customer Needs Creates Success? vs.
  71. 71. “QUOTES”
  72. 72. “If you look at your Product Designer as someone that makes your solution look presentable, look again. She is there to help you identify, investigate, and validate the problem, and ultimately craft, design, test and ship the solution.”
 https://medium.com/@ericeriksson/what-is-product-design-9709572cb3ff
  73. 73. “User research means spending time with the users of our products and services to understand who they are, what they’re doing, how they live their lives, and create a picture of these people who will be using the things that we’re trying to design and develop so we can bring that into our teams and make sure that we’re designing/developing the right things for people” https://gdsengagement.blog.gov.uk/2015/09/03/periscope-about-user-research-for-gov-uk/
  74. 74. https://www.flickr.com/photos/gdsteam/20954964200/in/photostream/
  75. 75. https://userresearch.blog.gov.uk/2015/03/18/so-youre-going-to-be-a-user-researcher-top-tips-to-get-you-going/ “Probably the most important thing to remember is that it’s not your job to be the expert on users. Rather, it’s your job to know the techniques that will allow your entire team to become expert in what users need…”
  76. 76. “The company, for example, did a study of 8,292 people in eight cities, examining morning routines.” “With this data in hand, Ikea came up with a freestanding mirror that has a rack on the back for hanging clothes and jewelry. The Knapper…” “Even surveying 8,292 people doesn’t always get you the right answer. The problem is that people lie. Ydholm puts it more delicately. “Sometimes we are not aware about how we behave,” he says, “and therefore we can say things that maybe are not the reality. Or it could be that we consciously or unconsciously express something because we want to stand out as a better person. That’s very human to do it like that.”” http://fortune.com/ikea-world-domination/
  77. 77. “The single most important attribute of any Product Manager worthy of the title is a fanatical devotion to the customer (and no, we’re not talking about Monty Python’s Spanish Inquisition).  The customer, and more specifically the end- user, should be the North Star for whatever a Product Manager does, says, plans, or thinks about… …and to know the customer, you have to engage with them on a regular basis.” http://www.cleverpm.com/2015/09/09/what-makes-a-good-product-manager/ www.cleverpm.com
  78. 78. “However, the more we share our work in progress, using a variety of testing methods at every stage of design, the more input we can get from the people the design is for. Multiple research methods ensure that we receive diverse feedback; and more diverse feedback helps our products better meet our users’ needs.” http://alistapart.com/article/sharing-our-work-testing-feedback-in-design
  79. 79. Fast Path to a Great UX: Increased Exposure Hours “It's the closest thing we've found to a silver bullet…” “The solution? Exposure hours. The number of hours each team member is exposed directly to real users interacting with the team's designs or the team's competitor's designs. There is a direct correlation between this exposure and the improvements we see in the designs that team produces.” https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/fast-path-great-ux-increased-exposure-hours-jared-spool
  80. 80. https://www.usertesting.com/blog/2015/09/02/empathy/ “It starts with the cardinal rule of UX: you are not your user. UX is about how someone else feels about your product or brand. No matter how much you hope they’ll feel a certain way, how they actually feel is what matters. And while that’s easy to say, it takes some effort to do.”
  81. 81. https://twitter.com/lukew/status/640231309277720576
  82. 82. http://www.fastcompany.com/3010999/innovation-agents/why-pinterest-makes-house-calls
  83. 83. “..would-be entrepreneurs, designers, and coders should all get out of the office and into the field more often. "It’s the Achilles’ heel of the tech industry," he says of the armchair tendency. "It’s easy to think you can sit at your computer and come up with the next big thing."
  84. 84. User experience cannot exist without users. Creating user interfaces involves intricate and complex decisions. User research is a tool that can help you achieve your goals. Even the most well thought out designs are assumptions until they are tested by real users. Different types of research can answer different types of questions. Know the tools and apply them accordingly. Leaving the user out is not an option. UX - U = X http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ux-without-user-research/
  85. 85. http://www.mindtheproduct.com/2014/11/leisa-reichelt-changing-organisations-to-improve-products/ “…highlights the importance of reducing the distance between the people designing the product and making decisions about them and the people who use them, through increased research and team participation in that research.”
  86. 86. DATA
  87. 87. Qualitative Quantitative
  88. 88. The Case for Talking to Users in the Age of Big Data “Observing users in person provides you with data that surveys and behavioral data simply can’t, just as surveys and behavioral metrics provide you with data and reliability that qualitative work can’t. You need both — and you need to do both well” https://medium.com/@mgallivan/the-case-for-talking-to-users-in-the-age-of-big-data-bca4159e9620
  89. 89. “As I watched Pedroia take infield practice, grabbing throws from Kevin Youkilis, the team’s hulking third baseman, and relaying them to his new first baseman Casey Kotchman, it was clear that there was something different about him. Pedroia’s actions were precise, whereas Youkilis botched a few plays and Kotchman’s attention seemed to wander. But mostly there was attitude: Pedroia whipped the ball around the infield, looking annoyed whenever he perceived a lack of concentration from his teammates.”
  90. 90. Creating a steady stream of data. Qualitative Quantitative
  91. 91. Qualitative Quantitative Analytics A/B Testing Clickstream 404 Testing Surveys “Voice of Customer” NPS Experian Contextual Inquiries Personas Journey Maps Workflow Diagrams Affinity Diagramming Validation Testing Usability Testing
  92. 92. Qualitative Quantitative Analytics A/B Testing Clickstream 404 Testing Surveys “Voice of Customer” NPS Experian Contextual Inquiries Personas Journey Maps Workflow Diagrams Affinity Diagramming Validation Testing Usability Testing
  93. 93. Quantitative Analytics A/B Testing Clickstream 404 Testing Surveys “Voice of Customer” NPS Experian
  94. 94. Bad stories? Where? “I met with people that would potentially use my product and it caused my company to go out of business"
  95. 95. Building (developing)
 for Experiments Trend #3
  96. 96. After the TV Source: @kpcb @johnmaeda @heif #DesignInTech http://kpcb.com/design Before the TV After the PC and Laptop In the age of Mobile ... Tech is no longer for Tech-ies, because Mobile is for Everybody (Right) Now The smartphone revolution brought design’s value into the foreground. We want to do in our palm, while walking, what we used to do on a big screen while sitting down at a desk. The interaction design challenges presented by that shift are huge. 21
  97. 97. Source: @kpcb @johnmaeda #DesignInTech Text 22 8AM 4PM once in the morning once in the evening User Experience matters so much, because we are Experiencing so much. A pain point can become a “pain plane” on mobile. That’s a lot of ouch. 150 unlocks = checking your phone every 5.6 minutes one interaction, one “ouch” just two ouch points The mobile paradigm should be thought of as “the always with you and in your face” paradigm. For that reason, a bad design will not just hurt once, but the hundreds of times you might use the bad design in a single day. That’s a lot of unnecessary “ouches.” http://www.kpcb.com/internet-trends
  98. 98. Context Feelings Insights Innovations Understanding Stories
  99. 99. “I can launch this app in three months” “This solution will launch in 12 months”
  100. 100. http://barryoreilly.com/2013/10/21/how-to-implement-hypothesis-driven-development/
  101. 101. Experimentation is the foundation of the scientific method, which is a systematic means of exploring the world around us. Although some experiments take place in laboratories, it is possible to perform an experiment anywhere, at any time, even in software development. Practicing Hypothesis-Driven Development[1] is thinking about the development of new ideas, products and services – even organizational change – as a series of experiments to determine whether an expected outcome will be achieved. The process is iterated upon until a desirable outcome is obtained or the idea is determined to be not viable. http://barryoreilly.com/2013/10/21/how-to-implement-hypothesis-driven-development/
  102. 102. Lean = Experiments
  103. 103. Developers are the masters of the now…
  104. 104. https://vimeo.com/133377447
  105. 105. “…at Netflix, they ported Webkit to the PS3 just to be able to test, release, build measure learn; they were able to release 4 different PS3 experiences on the same day to test” http://giffconstable.com/2013/06/bill-scotts-paypal-qcon-talk-putting-a-brain-on-agile/
  106. 106. Iterative testing… Mountain Testing…
  107. 107. “…in 2011, a copy change took 6 weeks to get on site” http://giffconstable.com/2013/06/bill-scotts-paypal-qcon-talk-putting-a-brain-on-agile/
  108. 108. “Engineer for Experimentation”
  109. 109. What needs to be fixed?
  110. 110. What needs to be fixed?
  111. 111. You.
  112. 112. Passion.
  113. 113. Top Trends in Product Design per @jeremyjohnson: Outcomes, Understanding Customers, and Building 
 for Experiments #bigd15 Tweet me

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