Putting the "User" back in User Experience

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If you ask a organization "Are you customer centric?" - of course they say "yes", but as you peel back the layers too many organizations have teams of people building products - and the user is nowhere in sight. This talk will go over a number of ways to include users in your product design process, from start to finish. It's time we truly live up to the term "User Experience".

Published in: Design

Putting the "User" back in User Experience

  1. Putting the User back in User Experience @jeremyjohnson
  2. @jeremyjohnson (yes, we’re hiring)
  3. http://www.slideshare.net/jeremy/presentations
  4. WORKED FOR
  5. WORKED WITH
  6. Revealing Reality Focused Innovation Discovery Ideation Contextual Inquiries Observe & document user in context/environment User Journals / Diaries Users document their experiences over time. Participatory Design Co-creation explorations with users. Card Sort Explore users’ mental models for content and labeling. Enterprise Architecture Capability Assessment Existing enterprise infrastructure. Only a subset of these activities will be appropriate for any given project. Analysis Foundational Analysis Stakeholder Interviews Understand staheholders’ business goals & strategy. Scenario-based System Walkthroughs Demo of existing solution. Application / IA Map Document the structure of the existing solution. Strategic Ideation Concepts Validation with Users Validate design prototypes through user feedback. KANO Feature Prioritization Prioritize features with users through KANO analysis. Qualitative & Quantitative Data Synthesis Analyze validation data.. Design Research Qualitative Observation Affinity Diagramming Construct themes from qualitative data. Persona Development Create customer types based on behaviors and values. Current Journey Map Visualize the user’s perspective of the current experience. Research Plan Design activities to meet research goals. Technical Organization Capability Analysis Existing skills and toolsets. Solution Architecture Assessment Existing application architecture. Content Inventory Catalog the content of the website. Heuristic Evaluation Identify initial breakdowns and opportunities. Competitive Analysis Evaluate competitors and comparables on specific axes. Client Data Analysis Market research, website feedback, corporate strategy, etc. Brand Analysis Evaluate the state of the brand. Metrics Evaluation Establish quantitative baseline of engagement & conversion data. Technology Digital Marketing User Workflow Modeling Visually document workflows & work systems. Quantitative Surveys Solicit structured feedback from users. Quantitative Data Visualization Present data visually. Conceptual User Scenari-os Scenarios Explanation Write high level TBD. narratives of an ideal future flow. Concepts: Paper / Interactive / Video Develop concepts for testing.with users. Storyboards Illustrate graphical representa-tions of scenarios. Experience Strategy Opportunities Prioritization Matrix Prioritize in three dimensions, including user experience impact. Future Journey Map Visualize the user’s future, improved experience. Consolidated User States Diagram Abstracted from individual user workflows. Design Principles Summarize the vision for the product/service in statements to guide the design. Experience Success Metrics Agree on business metrics for a successful user experience. Product / Experience Roadmap Plan how great UX can be achieved through the design. Elaboration Refined, Validated Concepts Refine the validated prototype based on findings. Analysis & Synthesis Deep Dive Workshops Immerse stakeholders in data and brainstorm opportunities. Opportunities Generation & Evaluation Opportunities & prototype choice. Marketing Opportunities Strategic planning of owned, earned, & paid online tactics. Optimization Consolidated Workflow Diagram Aggregate individual user workflows into one diagram. Content Creation Process Flow Design the content creation processes for the organization. Content Architecture Visualize all the content created, including creators and locations. Content Governance Plan Collaborative design how created content will be governed. Digital Marketing Creative Concepts to support search, display, social media, landing.
  7. Uncover user needs, Design great solutions, and build out solutions to launch.
  8. http://weandthecolor.com/back-to-the-future-poster-trilogy-by-phantom-city-creative/11727
  9. 2000
  10. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Completion 30 March 2000 Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete task-oriented information-oriented Abstract time Interface Design Navigation Design Conception Visual Design Information Design Interaction Design Architecture Functional Specifications Information Content Requirements User Needs Site Objectives User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  11. http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/09/01/think-your-app-is-beautiful-not-without-user-experience-design/
  12. “Beauty is wasted when our products don’t address real user needs in a usable manner” http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/09/01/think-your-app-is-beautiful-not-without-user-experience-design/
  13. http://t.co/vzaW4WSJil
  14. We’re not just painters!
  15. SO MUCH MORE COMPLEX.
  16. UX
  17. User Experience
  18. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Completion 30 March 2000 Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete task-oriented information-oriented Abstract time Interface Design Navigation Design Conception Visual Design Information Design Interaction Design Architecture Functional Specifications Information Content Requirements User Needs Site Objectives User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  19. 2010
  20. We own so much more than the website!
  21. SERVICE DESIGN
  22. “SEAT AT THE TABLE”
  23. http://www.forbes.com/sites/anthonykosner/2013/11/23/how-design-and-user-experience-translates-to-the-bottom-line/
  24. We’ve #WON
  25. http://blogs.hbr.org/2014/04/design-can-drive-exceptional-returns-for-shareholders/
  26. It’s not that easy.
  27. There are still 100s of companies that make revenue off software in the $100s of millions that don’t have a user experience team.
  28. “The problem from a user experience perspective is that enterprise systems are generally procured and implemented with the focus purely on solving problems for the business with little attention paid to who the users are and how they want to work.” http://www.foolproof.co.uk/thinking/the-user-experience-of-enterprise-technology/
  29. Solving Problems by Automating Solutions
  30. Is it harder than doing it manually? (I didn’t say “is it easy?”) https://www.flickr.com/photos/33989236@N00/4214027902/
  31. software users have raised the bar their expectations have changed.
  32. Sunday. Monday.
  33. “We’re focusing on User Experience”
  34. “We’re focusing on User Experience” I hired a UX guy! (or gal)
  35. # of developers # of UX designers
  36. # of developers # of UX designers
  37. UX Magic
  38. UX is complex. UX is everywhere. UX is business.
  39. 2015
  40. forgetting…
  41. UX is complex. UX is everywhere. UX is business. UX is for people.
  42. “users”
  43. “users” “people”
  44. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Completion 30 March 2000 Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete task-oriented information-oriented Abstract time Interface Design Navigation Design Conception Visual Design Information Design Interaction Design Architecture Functional Specifications Information Content Requirements User Needs Site Objectives User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  45. “user needs”
  46. The Elements of User Experience A basic duality: The Web was originally conceived as a hypertextual information space; but the development of increasingly sophisticated front- and back-end technologies has fostered its use as a remote software interface. This dual nature has led to much confusion, as user experience practitioners have attempted to adapt their terminology to cases beyond the scope of its original application. The goal of this document is to define some of these terms within their appropriate contexts, and to clarify the underlying relationships among these various elements. Jesse James Garrett jjg@jjg.net Completion 30 March 2000 Web as software interface Web as hypertext system Visual Design: graphic treatment of interface elements (the "look" in "look-and-feel") Information Architecture: structural design of the information space to facilitate intuitive access to content Interaction Design: development of application flows to facilitate user tasks, defining how the user interacts with site functionality Navigation Design: design of interface elements to facilitate the user's movement through the information architecture Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Functional Specifications: "feature set": detailed descriptions of functionality the site must include in order to meet user needs User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site Content Requirements: definition of content elements required in the site in order to meet user needs Interface Design: as in traditional HCI: design of interface elements to facilitate user interaction with functionality Information Design: in the Tuftean sense: designing the presentation of information to facilitate understanding Visual Design: visual treatment of text, graphic page elements and navigational components Concrete task-oriented information-oriented Abstract time Interface Design Navigation Design Conception Visual Design Information Design Interaction Design Architecture Functional Specifications Information Content Requirements User Needs Site Objectives User Needs: externally derived goals for the site; identified through user research, ethno/techno/psychographics, etc. Site Objectives: business, creative, or other internally derived goals for the site This picture is incomplete: The model outlined here does not account for secondary considerations (such as those arising during technical or content development) that may influence decisions during user experience development. Also, this model does not describe a development process, nor does it define roles within a user experience development team. Rather, it seeks to define the key considerations that go into the development of user experience on the Web today. © 2000 Jesse James Garrett http://www.jjg.net/ia/
  47. What UX isn’t https://medium.com/@jamieskella/what-ux-isnt-dee0436a194d
  48. Making informed and intelligent design decisions means the inclusion of user research and usability testing. Good design requires a deep understanding of your target demographic, only attained through quality data, being a result of unbiased research and testing. Designing for yourself is an easy trap to fall into. Even when wielding taste and best practice acknowledgement, doing so is a sure fire way to get it wrong for your target demographic. UX is the consideration of the many aspects of a user’s interactions with a product or service. It’s concern for the relationship between those interactions, which ultimately define a user’s perception of a brand as a whole. …acutely empathize with the audience they’re designing for. … good UX is the result of understanding the customer, seizing technological opportunity, and pursuing simplicity.
  49. http://www.nngroup.com/articles/ux-without-user-research/
  50. User experience cannot exist without users. Creating user interfaces involves intricate and complex decisions. User research is a tool that can help you achieve your goals. ! Even the most well thought out designs are assumptions until they are tested by real users. Different types of research can answer different types of questions. Know the tools and apply them accordingly. Leaving the user out is not an option. UX - U = X
  51. http://blogs.wsj.com/accelerators/2014/02/19/braden-kowitz-why-you-should-listen-to-the-customer/
  52. Investing in user research is just about the only way to consistently generate a rich stream of data about customer needs and behaviors. As a designer, I can’t live without it. And as data about customers flows through your team, it informs product managers, engineers, and just about everyone else. It forms the foundation of intuitive designs, indispensable products, and successful companies. So what are you waiting for? Go listen to your customers!
  53. Let’s talk about Listening to customers
  54. “Hey, I want you to go and understand our user’s needs.”
  55. “I’ve read stories about our users online” Marketing Data / Segmentation / Surveys
  56. “I’ve watched some videos about our users” Focus Groups / Past Usability Studies / Marketing Research
  57. “I’ve seen our users in the lab” Usability Testing / Concept Testing / Customer Councils
  58. “I went to our users and observed them” Contextual Inquires / Field Studies / Interviews
  59. “I understand best practices, and I’m a student of psychology" I have experience / I’m great at what I do
  60. aka Shut up, I’m a design genius.
  61. Q. Which one accurately answers the question:
  62. “Hey, I want you to go and understand our user’s needs.”
  63. “I want to know them so well, the system we design “just works” for them.”
  64. User Experience
  65. User Experience
  66. Web Design vs. User Experience
  67. User Experience
  68. “Top Job” http://money.cnn.com/pf/best-jobs/2012/snapshots/43.html
  69. “Top Job” http://money.cnn.com/pf/best-jobs/2012/snapshots/43.html
  70. http://www.uxutd.com/
  71. “Give me three skills a ux designer needs today and for the future”
  72. HTML ILLUSTRATOR PHOTOSHOP
  73. empathy
  74. http://poetpainter.com/
  75. HARD http://poetpainter.com/ “EASY”
  76. http://poetpainter.com/
  77. “personal significance” “works like I think”
  78. “Hey, I want you to go and understand our user’s needs, wants, and desires.”
  79. You get there by understanding your users.
  80. 5 WAYS Getting to know your users helps YOU.
  81. Learn the unexpected
  82. https://twitter.com/jmspool/statuses/421414065496289280
  83. 1. Business needs data to backup decisions.
  84. 2. Mind-blowing, astonishing, insights.
  85. 3. Something in-between…
  86. Observations will speak volumes for your users.
  87. User Quotes
  88. “I like the idea, but I’d never use this.”
  89. “What I really need is a way to save this for later.”
  90. “I have no idea how to use this, so I just skip that whole step”
  91. “I usually just print it out and file it away.”
  92. “I use this because it makes me feel like I’m mastering something”
  93. Affinity Diagramming
  94. Solving the right problems
  95. Product Owner “I know” CEO Designer CMO Developer
  96. Institutional Knowledge
  97. The 8 Monkeys http://speakingofresearch.com/category/news/campus-activism/
  98. http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/making-a-difference/striking-out-als-ice-bucket-challenge-brings-flood-donations-n177896
  99. The 8 Monkeys http://speakingofresearch.com/category/news/campus-activism/
  100. Institutional Knowledge
  101. Go observe, talk to, and interact with your users! Get first hand experience of your user’s problems!
  102. Show you care
  103. #1 reaction when observing users of business-to-business software?
  104. “Wow, you care about us? I thought we were abandoned to the depths of bad software!”
  105. + Signed longer contracts +Bought new software + Excited user base
  106. #1 reaction when observing users.
  107. Hugs.
  108. You’re the expert
  109. “Hey, who do I go to, I have a question about what we should do here?”
  110. Amount you know about your users Number of questions you’ll get about the direction of your product
  111. “SEAT AT THE TABLE”
  112. + You know what will set you apart + Quotes are Business Ammo + You understand the problems + You’re users love you + You’re now the expert
  113. Design Research (or User Research)
  114. https://twitter.com/jmspool/statuses/409433591643246592
  115. Usability Testing vs. User Research
  116. Revealing Reality Focused Innovation Building & Evolving Pre-Discovery Discovery Ideation Design & Development Release Go to Market Contextual Inquiries Observe & document user in context/environment User Journals / Diaries Users document their experiences over time. Participatory Design Co-creation explorations with users. Card Sort Explore users’ mental models for content and labeling. Enterprise Architecture Capability Assessment Existing enterprise infrastructure. Only a subset of these activities will be appropriate for any given project. Engagement Readiness Analysis Foundational Analysis Innovation Training Design Thinking Workshop Teach the design thinking framework. Stakeholder Interviews Understand staheholders’ business goals & strategy. Scenario-based System Walkthroughs Demo of existing solution. Application / IA Map Document the structure of the existing solution. Strategic Ideation Concepts Validation with Users Validate design prototypes through user feedback. KANO Feature Prioritization Prioritize features with users through KANO analysis. Qualitative & Quantitative Data Synthesis Analyze validation data.. Align & Assess Workshop Assess readiness across 7 capabilites. Design Research Qualitative Observation Affinity Diagramming Construct themes from qualitative data. Persona Development Create customer types based on behaviors and values. Current Journey Map Visualize the user’s perspective of the current experience. Research Plan Design activities to meet research goals. Technical Organization Capability Analysis Existing skills and toolsets. Solution Architecture Assessment Existing application architecture. Content Inventory Catalog the content of the website. Heuristic Evaluation Identify initial breakdowns and opportunities. Competitive Analysis Evaluate competitors and comparables on specific axes. Client Data Analysis Market research, website feedback, corporate strategy, etc. Brand Analysis Evaluate the state of the brand. Metrics Evaluation Establish quantitative baseline of engagement & conversion data. Research UX Design Technology Digital Marketing User Workflow Modeling Visually document workflows & work systems. Quantitative Surveys Solicit structured feedback from users. Quantitative Data Visualization Present data visually. Conceptual User Scenari-os Scenarios Explanation Write high level TBD. narratives of an ideal future flow. Concepts: Paper / Interactive / Video Develop concepts for testing.with users. Storyboards Illustrate graphical representa-tions of scenarios. Experience Strategy Opportunities Prioritization Matrix Prioritize in three dimensions, including user experience impact. Future Journey Map Visualize the user’s future, improved experience. Consolidated User States Diagram Abstracted from individual user workflows. Design Principles Summarize the vision for the product/service in statements to guide the design. Experience Success Metrics Agree on business metrics for a successful user experience. Product / Experience Roadmap Plan how great UX can be achieved through the design. Elaboration Detailed User Scenarios Write detailed narratives for user experience flows. Application / Navigation Framework Concepts Create models for the framework of the application. Workflow Concepts Draw high-level wireframes for key workflows. Sprint Execution Deploy Campaign Execution Digital Marketing Go Live Campaign launch. Skills Transfer Educate client development team. Ongoing User Research Targeted analysis of subsequent releases. Periodic Strategy and Execution Review Assess progress towards goals. Qualitative Research Investigate ongoing opportunities and concepts with users. Ideation / Validation Create testable concepts and validate them with users. Unit Testing Test system units in isolation. Development Write code and tests to complete sprint tasks. Requirements / User Stories Definition Write user stories based on detailed user scenarios. Application Map / Information Architecture Map the product from the users’ point of view. Look & Feel Studies Explore different visual treatments and styles. Refined, Validated Concepts Refine the validated prototype based on findings. Zero Feature Release Demonstrate CI, automated testing, core solution setup. High Level Technical Architecture Describe high level architecture, including packaged components. IXD / Wireframing Create high fidelity wireframes of the design. Prototypes Build paper or coded prototypes to validate interactions. Deploy Release to production. Sprint Planning Commit to stories, break down tasks. Retrospective Refine approach based on what was effective. Sprint Demo Demo completed work to stakeholders. Interaction Design Library Determine & document interaction patterns. Backlog Grooming Reprioritize backlog, add new stories. Identify new & emerging opportunities Analyze research / validation results to yield new stories. Launch Analysis & Synthesis Deep Dive Workshops Immerse stakeholders in data and brainstorm opportunities. Opportunities Generation & Evaluation Opportunities & prototype choice. Marketing Opportunities Strategic planning of owned, earned, & paid online tactics. Campaign Optimization Testing of creative, media, bids & landing experiences. Campaign Measurement In-depth analysis of campaign results and trends. Campaign Refinement Iterative enhancement of campaign tactics. Beyond Conversion Optimization Digital Marketing SWOT Analysis Identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities & threats. Usability Testing Evaluate the product’s designs or code through user testing. Continuous Integration Continuously build, test, deploy, and integration test the system. Integration Testing Test subsystems and their integration. Run Book Creation Create & update artifacts for maintenance & monitoring. Non-functional Requirements Testing Test performance & scalability. QA Testing Validate completed stories against acceptance criteria. Visual Design Apply visual designs to the wireframes and generate assets. Visual Design Library Determine & document visual design patterns. User Education & Training Conduct training sessions, create help content. Continuous Refinement Production-Ready Completed Features Content Creation Process Flow Design the content creation processes for the organization. Content Governance Plan Collaborative design how created content will be governed. Consolidated Workflow Built and tested features. Diagram Aggregate individual user workflows into one diagram. Content Architecture Visualize all the content created, including creators and locations. Digital Marketing Creative Concepts to support search, display, social media, landing. Design Validation For example, a RITE study. Development Infrastructure Configuration Continuous Integration setup. Technical Package Identification / Evaluation Perform product evaluations for package solution components. Architecture Spikes / Proofs of Concept Prove candidate architectures via top to bottom spikes.
  117. “The perspective and processes ————— is focusing on and perfecting will, over time, become standard operating procedure for any application development project.”
  118. http://www.fastcodesign.com/3031942/google-ventures-on-8-shortcuts-for-better-faster-design-research
  119. http://www.slideshare.net/jeremy/failing-fast-learning-along-the-way-big-design-2013
  120. Today 6 months 3 years
  121. 8 Design Research practices to kick start your user knowledge!
  122. Participatory Design Contextual Inquiries Affinity Diagramming Understand Design Refine Persona Development Concept Validation Workflow Modeling KANO Feature Prioritization Card Sorting 404 testing User Journals / Diaries
  123. Contextual Inquiries
  124. A contextual inquiry interview is usually structured as an approximately two-hour, one-on-one interaction in which the researcher watches the user do their normal activities and discusses what they see with the user. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Contextual_inquiry
  125. Observing Users.
  126. Persona Development
  127. Primary Persona David Corporate Employee, 40 yrs old Health Conscious “I workout a couple times a week, and want to make sure I’m as healthy as I can be” Number of doctor visits a year: 5 Years without major health issue: 8 About David: Experience: Health Motivators: Goals: Technology Adoption: 90% 55% 100% Ideal State: David’s Edge: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum metus a, luctus dolor. Cras est dui, lobortis et nisi quis, viverra vehicula purus. Vestibulum ultrices ut eros a egestas. Phasellus egestas ligula sit amet nulla vehicula egestas. Maecenas interdum porta faucibus. Sed id mauris ac turpis pretium pretium. Praesent euismod vitae sem vitae tincidunt. Mauris interdum. • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur • adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. • Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum • metus a, luctus dolor. Cras est dui, lobortis et • nisi quis, viverra vehicula purus. Vestibulum • ]ultrices ut eros a egestas. Phasellus egestas Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum metus a, luctus dolor. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum metus a, luctus dolor. Cras est dui, lobortis et nisi quis, viverra vehicula purus. Vestibulum ultrices ut eros a egestas. Phasellus egestas ligula sit amet nulla vehicula egestas. Maecenas interdum porta faucibus. Sed id mauris ac turpis pretium pretium. Praesent euismod vitae sem vitae tincidunt. Mauris interdum. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Praesent eu ligula est. Pellentesque a dolor molestie, vestibulum metus a, luctus dolor. Cras est dui, lobortis et nisi quis, viverra vehicula purus. Vestibulum ultrices ut eros a egestas. Phasellus egestas ligula sit amet nulla vehicula egestas. Maecenas interdum porta faucibus. Sed id mauris ac turpis pretium pretium. Praesent euismod.
  128. http://blog.mailchimp.com/new-mailchimp-user-persona-research/
  129. As a user… Jane needs to…
  130. Concept Validation
  131. User-centered design can be characterized as a multi-stage problem solving process that not only requires designers to analyze and foresee how users are likely to use a product, but also to test the validity of their assumptions with regard to user behavior in real world tests with actual users. Such testing is necessary as it is often very difficult for the designers of a product to understand intuitively what a first-time user of their design experiences, and what each user's learning curve may look like. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User-centered_design
  132. Affinity Diagramming
  133. Participatory Design
  134. “Participatory design aims to bring users into the design process by facilitating conversations through the creation and completion of a wide range of activities.” http://designmind.frogdesign.com/blog/bringing-users-into-your-process-through-participatory-design.html
  135. http://www.slideshare.net/frogdesign/bringing-users-into-your-process-through-participatory-design
  136. Card Sorting
  137. http://www.optimalworkshop.com/treejack.htm
  138. 404 testing
  139. Comics, fast! www.ubercomics.com Want comics delivered to your home, fast? Download our app!
  140. User Journals / Diaries
  141. “In interviews, it can be difficult to get a sense of behavior over time because you have to rely on the participant’s memory of past activities or circumstances, and artifacts can only do so much to prompt that.” http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/jumpstart-design-research-with-a-diary-study/
  142. http://www.slideshare.net/jaremfan/the-goodness-of-diary-studies
  143. http://www.trackyourhappiness.org/
  144. “46.9 percent of the time the responders said their minds were wandering when the iPhone rang to query their thoughts.” http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2010/11/11/iphone-users-report-that-daydreams-make-them-sad/
  145. 8 Design Research practices to kick start your user knowledge!
  146. Rockstars!
  147. Tomer Sharon User Experience Researcher at Google Search https://plus.google.com/+TomerSharon/about
  148. http://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/lean-user-research/
  149. Google I/O 2014 - Perfectly executing the wrong plan https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TJTbRw4ri8
  150. Research + Lean Startup
  151. Leisa Reichelt Head of User Research at the Government Digital Service in the Cabinet Office http://www.disambiguity.com/
  152. http://www.disambiguity.com/help-joy-help-you/
  153. https://twitter.com/leisa
  154. https://userresearch.blog.gov.uk/
  155. Big Government + Empathy
  156. Peter Eckert Co-Founder & CXO http://projekt202.com/
  157. 10+ Years
  158. Enterprise / Complex Software + Design Research
  159. Revealing Reality Focused Innovation Building & Evolving Pre-Discovery Discovery Ideation Design & Development Release Go to Market Contextual Inquiries Observe & document user in context/environment User Journals / Diaries Users document their experiences over time. Participatory Design Co-creation explorations with users. Card Sort Explore users’ mental models for content and labeling. Enterprise Architecture Capability Assessment Existing enterprise infrastructure. Only a subset of these activities will be appropriate for any given project. Engagement Readiness Analysis Foundational Analysis Innovation Training Design Thinking Workshop Teach the design thinking framework. Stakeholder Interviews Understand staheholders’ business goals & strategy. Scenario-based System Walkthroughs Demo of existing solution. Application / IA Map Document the structure of the existing solution. Strategic Ideation Concepts Validation with Users Validate design prototypes through user feedback. KANO Feature Prioritization Prioritize features with users through KANO analysis. Qualitative & Quantitative Data Synthesis Analyze validation data.. Align & Assess Workshop Assess readiness across 7 capabilites. Design Research Qualitative Observation Affinity Diagramming Construct themes from qualitative data. Persona Development Create customer types based on behaviors and values. Current Journey Map Visualize the user’s perspective of the current experience. Research Plan Design activities to meet research goals. Technical Organization Capability Analysis Existing skills and toolsets. Solution Architecture Assessment Existing application architecture. Content Inventory Catalog the content of the website. Heuristic Evaluation Identify initial breakdowns and opportunities. Competitive Analysis Evaluate competitors and comparables on specific axes. Client Data Analysis Market research, website feedback, corporate strategy, etc. Brand Analysis Evaluate the state of the brand. Metrics Evaluation Establish quantitative baseline of engagement & conversion data. Research UX Design Technology Digital Marketing User Workflow Modeling Visually document workflows & work systems. Quantitative Surveys Solicit structured feedback from users. Quantitative Data Visualization Present data visually. Conceptual User Scenari-os Scenarios Explanation Write high level TBD. narratives of an ideal future flow. Concepts: Paper / Interactive / Video Develop concepts for testing.with users. Storyboards Illustrate graphical representa-tions of scenarios. Experience Strategy Opportunities Prioritization Matrix Prioritize in three dimensions, including user experience impact. Future Journey Map Visualize the user’s future, improved experience. Consolidated User States Diagram Abstracted from individual user workflows. Design Principles Summarize the vision for the product/service in statements to guide the design. Experience Success Metrics Agree on business metrics for a successful user experience. Product / Experience Roadmap Plan how great UX can be achieved through the design. Elaboration Detailed User Scenarios Write detailed narratives for user experience flows. Application / Navigation Framework Concepts Create models for the framework of the application. Workflow Concepts Draw high-level wireframes for key workflows. Sprint Execution Deploy Campaign Execution Digital Marketing Go Live Campaign launch. Skills Transfer Educate client development team. Ongoing User Research Targeted analysis of subsequent releases. Periodic Strategy and Execution Review Assess progress towards goals. Qualitative Research Investigate ongoing opportunities and concepts with users. Ideation / Validation Create testable concepts and validate them with users. Unit Testing Test system units in isolation. Development Write code and tests to complete sprint tasks. Requirements / User Stories Definition Write user stories based on detailed user scenarios. Application Map / Information Architecture Map the product from the users’ point of view. Look & Feel Studies Explore different visual treatments and styles. Refined, Validated Concepts Refine the validated prototype based on findings. Zero Feature Release Demonstrate CI, automated testing, core solution setup. High Level Technical Architecture Describe high level architecture, including packaged components. IXD / Wireframing Create high fidelity wireframes of the design. Prototypes Build paper or coded prototypes to validate interactions. Deploy Release to production. Sprint Planning Commit to stories, break down tasks. Retrospective Refine approach based on what was effective. Sprint Demo Demo completed work to stakeholders. Interaction Design Library Determine & document interaction patterns. Backlog Grooming Reprioritize backlog, add new stories. Identify new & emerging opportunities Analyze research / validation results to yield new stories. Launch Analysis & Synthesis Deep Dive Workshops Immerse stakeholders in data and brainstorm opportunities. Opportunities Generation & Evaluation Opportunities & prototype choice. Marketing Opportunities Strategic planning of owned, earned, & paid online tactics. Campaign Optimization Testing of creative, media, bids & landing experiences. Campaign Measurement In-depth analysis of campaign results and trends. Campaign Refinement Iterative enhancement of campaign tactics. Beyond Conversion Optimization Digital Marketing SWOT Analysis Identify strengths, weaknesses, opportunities & threats. Usability Testing Evaluate the product’s designs or code through user testing. Continuous Integration Continuously build, test, deploy, and integration test the system. Integration Testing Test subsystems and their integration. Run Book Creation Create & update artifacts for maintenance & monitoring. Non-functional Requirements Testing Test performance & scalability. QA Testing Validate completed stories against acceptance criteria. Visual Design Apply visual designs to the wireframes and generate assets. Visual Design Library Determine & document visual design patterns. User Education & Training Conduct training sessions, create help content. Continuous Refinement Production-Ready Completed Features Content Creation Process Flow Design the content creation processes for the organization. Content Governance Plan Collaborative design how created content will be governed. Consolidated Workflow Built and tested features. Diagram Aggregate individual user workflows into one diagram. Content Architecture Visualize all the content created, including creators and locations. Digital Marketing Creative Concepts to support search, display, social media, landing. Design Validation For example, a RITE study. Development Infrastructure Configuration Continuous Integration setup. Technical Package Identification / Evaluation Perform product evaluations for package solution components. Architecture Spikes / Proofs of Concept Prove candidate architectures via top to bottom spikes.
  160. Last…
  161. https://www.behance.net/gallery/PRESENTATION-User-Research/4890075
  162. https://www.behance.net/gallery/PRESENTATION-User-Research/4890075
  163. Thanks! @jeremyjohnson
  164. “If you’re not involving your users, you’re not a User Experience Designer” #bigd14 #designresearch via: @jeremyjohnson Who needs users! I’m a design genius! @jeremyjohnson doesn’t know what he’s talking about #iknowbest #forgetusers #bigd14

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