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Incident Command System

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The Incident Command System (ICS) is a model for command, control, and coordination of emergency response at the site level.

ICS is “Organized Common Sense”

  • Hey guys! Who wants to chat with me? More photos with me here 👉 http://www.bit.ly/katekoxx
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  • Wanted to know if you could share in a manipulatable format - I have a family member undergoing cancer treatments with a huge support system all set to stumble all over each other. Thanks.
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  • This is awesome; I was inside the ICS System when we honored the 343 FDNY FF's who perished on 9/11. I think the wedding example is terrific.
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  • Sir, well appreciated your work...can i download this presentation?..thank you
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  • @Ryann Castro Big Thanx Sir.
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Incident Command System

  1. 1. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM Supplemented by Ryann U. Castro
  2. 2. WHAT IS THE INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM? The Incident Command System (ICS) is a model for command, control, and coordination of emergency response at the site level. 2
  3. 3. LESSONS WITHOUT FORMAL ICS World Trade Centre   3 “The Police and Fire Departments did not work together that day, and they rarely did before.” (Command and Control issue) “Other firefighters appear to have been using one radio channel while evacuation orders went out over another.” (Communications issue)
  4. 4. LESSONS WITHOUT FORMAL ICS Firestorm 2003  “The criticisms the Review Team heard ranged from too many bosses, to no one running the ship, to lack of coordination, to jurisdictions and responsibilities were confusing.” (Command & Control issues) 4
  5. 5. WHY USE THE INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM? The same ICS structure can also be used to coordinate site support at an Emergency Operations Centre or regional/provincial support activity, or national support activity. 5
  6. 6. WHO USES THE INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM? • • • • • • • • • 6 RCMP Municipal Police Ambulance Services Fire Services Airport Authorities Transport Authorities Food Inspectors Border Services Health Providers • • • • • • • • • Industry Military First Nations Groups Hospitals Labor Unions Sheriff Services Correctional Centers Schools Shopping Centers
  7. 7. HISTORY OF ICS FIRESCOPE Wildland fires in the 1970s: • Multiple agencies involved • Organizational difficulties experienced • Result was the development of the original ICS 7
  8. 8. REOCCURRING PROBLEM AREAS:        8 Terminology Organizational structure Communications Action plans Span of control Incident facilities Resource management
  9. 9. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM KEY POINTS
  10. 10. ICS PRINCIPLES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 10 Five Primary Functions Establishing and Transferring Command Single or Unified Command Structure Management by Objectives Consolidated Incident Action Plans Comprehensive Resource Management Unity and Chain of Command Manageable Span of Control Modular Organization Personnel Accountability Common Terminology Integrated Communications
  11. 11. ICS RESPONSE GOALS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 11 Provide for safety and health of all responders Save lives Reduce suffering Protect public health Protect government infrastructure Protect property Protect the environment Reduce economic and social losses
  12. 12. FIVE PRIMARY ICS MANAGEMENT FUNCTIONS Command Operations 12 Planning Logistics Finance/ Admin
  13. 13. ICS RESPONSE FUNCTIONS Command The “Boss” Operations  The “Do-ers” Planning  The “Thinkers” Logistics  The “Getters” Finance/Admin 13   The “Payers”
  14. 14. THE WEDDING… Bridal Shower Billing Drinks Invitations Rehearsal Licenses Gifts Accommodations Clothing (Her) Hair Styling Photos Cake Bachelor Party Reception Music Rings Food Clothing (Him) Ceremony Transportation Rentals Venues Flowers Service Providers Travel Registry 14
  15. 15. THE WEDDING… Potential problem areas?  Organization  Communication  Planning  Span of control  Facilities  Resources  Costs 15
  16. 16. THE WEDDING… Bridal Shower Billing Drinks Invitations Rehearsal Licenses Gifts Accommodations Clothing (Her) Hair Styling Photos Cake Bachelor Party Reception Music Rings Food Clothing (Him) Ceremony Transportation Rentals Venues Flowers Service Providers Travel Registry 16
  17. 17. “OPERATION BRIDEZILLA” Command Planning Bridal Shower Flowers Transportation Vendors Bachelor Party Food Travel Services Rehearsal Registry Accommodation Insurance Ceremony Music Licenses Rentals Reception Seating Venues Billing Invitations Cake 17 Logistics Finance/ Admin Operations
  18. 18. THE WEDDING… Practical examples of ICS usage…  Social events  Athletic tournaments  Demonstrations  Work stoppages ICS is “organized common sense” 18
  19. 19. COMMAND   19 Sets objectives and priorities Responsible for all incident or event activity
  20. 20. SINGLE COMMAND   20 The Incident Commander is responsible for all incidents or event activity. There will always be an Incident Commander.
  21. 21. UNIFIED COMMAND A B A-ICS C 21 C-ICS B-ICS
  22. 22. UNIFIED COMMAND A B A C 22 B C
  23. 23. TRANSFER OF COMMAND As an incident grows and becomes more complex, a transfer of command to a more qualified person may take place. 23
  24. 24. COMMAND STAFF POSITIONS IC Information Officer Safety Officer Liaison Officer Operations 24 Planning Logistics Finance/Admin
  25. 25. INFORMATION OFFICER The Information Officer:   Is responsible for interface with the media.  25 Coordinates the release of information to the public and responders. Works in cooperation with the E/DOC Information Officer.
  26. 26. SAFETY OFFICER The Safety Officer:   26 Formulates measures to protect personnel safety Takes immediate action to stop or prevent unsafe acts when conditions or time do not permit going through lines of authority
  27. 27. SAFETY OFFICER? 27
  28. 28. LIAISON OFFICER The Liaison Officer:   Acts as a diplomat  28 Acts as the point of contact for assisting or cooperating agencies Works with private contractors to address needs
  29. 29. AGENCY REPRESENTATIVES An Agency Representative is an individual assigned to an incident from an assisting or cooperating agency (Who has been delegated full authority to make decisions on all matters affecting that agency’s participation at the incident). 29
  30. 30. GENERAL STAFF POSITIONS IC Information Officer Safety Officer Liaison Officer Operations Section 30 Planning Section Logistics Section Finance/Admin Section
  31. 31. OPERATIONS IC Information Officer Safety Officer Liaison Officer Operations Section 31 Planning Section Logistics Section Finance/Admin Section
  32. 32. OPERATIONS • Conducts tactical operations • Develops the tactical objectives and organization • Directs all Resources 32
  33. 33. PLANNING IC Information Officer Safety Officer Liaison Officer Operations Section 33 Planning Section Logistics Section Finance/Admin Section
  34. 34. PLANNING   Maintains status of resources  Prepares Incident Action Plan (IAP)  34 Collects, evaluates, and displays incident information Prepares other incident related documentation
  35. 35. INCIDENT PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS 35
  36. 36. DIVIDING AN INCIDENT 36
  37. 37. INCIDENT PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS 37
  38. 38. INCIDENT PLANNING CONSIDERATIONS 38
  39. 39. DIVIDING AN INCIDENT 39
  40. 40. LOGISTICS IC Information Officer Safety Officer Liaison Officer Operations Section 40 Planning Section Logistics Section Finance/Admin Section
  41. 41. LOGISTICS   Provides resources  41 Provides services and support to meet the incident- or event’s needs Provides other services
  42. 42. FINANCE/ADMINISTRATION IC Information Officer Safety Officer Liaison Officer Operations Section 42 Planning Section Logistics Section Finance/Admin Section
  43. 43. FINANCE/ADMINISTRATION  Keeps track of incident related expenses   43 procurement contracts   equipment records other financial related expenses of the incident Monitors costs
  44. 44. MANAGEMENT BY OBJECTIVES Objectives  Attainable  Measurable  Flexible 44
  45. 45. RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN ICS Single Resource Includes Personnel and Equipment Strike Team Combination of same kind and type Task Force Combination of Single Resources 45
  46. 46. RESOURCE STATUS CONDITIONS IN ICS Available Assigned 46 Out of Service
  47. 47. UNITY AND CHAIN OF COMMAND OPERATIONS SECTION STAGING AREA SPECIAL OPERATIONS BRANCHES DIVISIONS GROUPS Task Forces Single Resources 47 Strike Teams Single Resources individual has a designated Task Forces Strike Teams In ICS every supervisor
  48. 48. MODULAR ORGANIZATION Command Command Staff Operations Branch 1 A B C Medical Other Branches Division/ Group Resources 48
  49. 49. SPAN OF CONTROL Span of control is the number of resources that one supervisory level can effectively manage. In ICS span of control ranges from 3 to 7. (1:3, 1:7) 49
  50. 50. COMMON TERMINOLOGY Use ICS position titles:  In multi-agency incidents to provide standardization.  All ICS communications should use clear text (that is, plain language). Do not use radio codes, agency-specific codes, acronyms, or other jargon.  In ordering resources to ensure understanding.  To allow most qualified personnel to be used. “I don’t have a qualified IC for this incident. Does your agency have one that could be assigned?” 50
  51. 51. INCIDENT COMMAND POST   Only one per incident  May be located with other facilities  51 Location where primary command functions are performed Normally not relocated
  52. 52. STAGING AREAS      Temporary locations for resources awaiting assignments Resources on a three minute available status May include fueling and sanitation Staging Area Manager is required May be designated for certain kinds of resources S 52
  53. 53. HELIBASE/S  Location where helicopters parked, maintained, fueled, and loaded H 53 may be
  54. 54. HELISPOT/S   Temporary locations where helicopters can safely land and take off Used to load or off-load personnel, equipment, and supplies H-3 54
  55. 55. CAMPS/BASES     Temporary locations to provide services to incident personnel Primary support activity Logistics Section located at Base Out-of-service equipment and personnel normally located here C 55 B
  56. 56. ICS MULTI-LEVEL RESPONSE 8. Manage Additional Resources 7. Establish Additional Facilities 6. Review and Modify the Incident Action Plan 5. Develop Appropriate Organization 4. Manage Resources 3. Organize The Site 2. Determine Initial Objectives, Strategies & Tactics 1. Establish Initial Command 56
  57. 57. CONSIDER The “Summit of the Americas” in Quebec City required the registration of 7500 residents, deployment of over 6000 riot police, 1000 workers to build a 4 km fence to contain 25 - 60,000 protesters at a cost of $100 million. 57
  58. 58. EMERGENCY/DISASTER OPERATIONS CENTER Key Points 58
  59. 59. EMERGENCY RESPONSE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM  Comprehensive management scheme  Ensures coordinated & organized Provincial response & recovery  Common response culture  Plans are similar  Only one “system” to learn  Eliminates duplication 59
  60. 60. MULTI-LEVEL RESPONSE STRUCTURE ICS principles are used at all levels. NATIONAL REGIONAL/PROVINCIAL SITE SUPPORT LEVEL E/DOC SITE LEVEL INCIDENT COMMAND POST 60
  61. 61. QUESTIONS? 61

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