Dr. Richard Straub  | President of the European eLearning Industry Group | Advisor to the Chairman IBM EMEA [email_addre...
eLIG - 23  CO MMERCIAL MEMBERS
<ul><li>AGH-UST Poland   </li></ul><ul><li>Austrian Computer Society    </li></ul><ul><li>C2k  </li></ul><ul><li>CeLeKT - ...
Skills & Employability – Lifelong Learning as a “Must” <ul><li>Employability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Being equipped with val...
The Environment  – Accelerating Change Point Solutions Market/Product Expansion Product/Manufacturing Business Values Gene...
Key findings and conclusions: e-readiness 2006 World more ready than ever – 1 bn internet users/ 2 bn mobile phone users A...
Worldwide ranking on E-readiness  Source: EIU/IBM e-readiness ranking 2006 8.19 Austria ▼ 14 15 8.36 Hong Kong ▼ 6 (tie) 1...
High Value Jobs moving into Services Estimations based on Porat, M. (1977) Info Economy: Definitions and Measurement, Augm...
Moving towards a Multigenerational Workforce <ul><li>81% of the business population age 34 or younger are gamers </li></ul...
“ T he Web was shifting from being a medium, in which information was transmitted and consumed, into being a platform, in ...
Not so fast……the new World will be “blended” – the 4 Cs <ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High Quality and Open Source...
However – eLearning 2.0 Offers important new Capabilities <ul><li>Need to be “tamed” and leveraged </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A...
An Open ICT Ecosystem – foundation for Interoperability Connected via an Open  ICT Ecosystem Policies Strategies Processes...
How to achieve “Sustained Employability”  <ul><li>Development of Human Resource Strategies at Country/Region Level </li></...
How to achieve “Sustained Employability” (cont’d)  <ul><li>Improve Formal Education (Quantity and Quality) </li></ul><ul><...
The Challenge – Knowledge Worker Productivity <ul><li>“ The chief economic priority for developed countries is to  raise t...
 
Innovation as the Engine for Growth and Productivity and Jobs Global Collaborative Cross- Disciplinary Traditional R & D L...
<ul><li>more critical than ever in the context of a &quot;knowledge based society&quot;.  </li></ul><ul><li>- pays off for...
The Lisbon Strategy – Education as a Core Element <ul><li>“ Europe to become a worldwide quality reference in education & ...
Investment in Learning Examples <ul><li>- Better skills -  better wages.  </li></ul><ul><li>Return to investment for one a...
Education as the key factor for skills and employment <ul><li>Lisbon target 2000: employment rate from around 62% to 70%  ...
Overview <ul><li>Change becoming the only constant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology “flattening” the world </li></ul></ul>...
<ul><li>Problems </li></ul><ul><li>- Structural change and productivity growth require a continued investment in </li></ul...
The CIP comprises three sub-programmes:  The Entrepreneurship and Innovation Programme, the ICT Policy Support Programme t...
<ul><li>Actions  will aim at: </li></ul><ul><li>- promoting innovation in processes, services and products enabled by ICT,...
Innovation in Learning – Sharing and Collaboration Community Building between CLOs   <ul><li>Corporate Learning Improvemen...

The next big thing: Innovation “ We will fight our battles not on the low road to commoditization, but on the high road of...
“ Economic competition in the flat world will be  more equal and more intense... the most important attribute you can have...
Reinventing ways of doing business Instant, in-store promotions are based on real-time view of customer buying behaviors a...
Overview of the rankings, methods and changes <ul><li>E-readiness, now in its seventh year of publication, is defined as i...
Has e-Learning gone Mainstream ? <ul><li>E-readiness, now in its seventh year of publication, is defined as in indication ...
pressures and opportunities <ul><li>2 out of 3 CEOs  said they have to bring about fundamental change in the next 2 years ...
In 2006, CEOs are looking to innovation to drive fundamental change that enables sustainable growth, but . . . Extent of F...
innovation:   how? From free Enterprise to “Enterprise Free” Forrester; IDC; IBM “ Building an Edge ,” Vol 5, No. 8;  Moor...
innovation:   how? new forms of collaboration IBM Institute for Business Value, CEO Study 2006 CEOs: Sources of new ideas ...
Trends in the ONLINE World Openness Changing nature of Internet users  <ul><li>Information meant to be shared </li></ul><u...
eLearning Transformation: E-Learning 2.0 – A social revolution Source: E-learning 2.0,  Stephen Downes, Nat. Research Coun...
Summary <ul><li>Innovation is becoming the critical determinant of success in the information economy </li></ul><ul><li>Th...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Sustaining Employability - Innovation in Lifelong Learning

1,735 views

Published on

Richard Straub
EDEN Annual Conference, 2006, Vienna

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,735
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • So what is Collaborative Innovation? In the past we liked to compare PRODUCT-DRIVEN vs MARKET-DRIVEN models, the former being “built it and they will buy’ mentality vs the later being Build it because we know they need it! SO we can look look at How we have performed Product Innovation by what we call MONOLITHIC INNOVATION and the proposed COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION models In the old model, firms try to control the whole innovation process from the top-down. But you can’t control innovation networks because they evolve organically, rather you focus on what you do best and build symbiotic --or win-win-- partnerships with other specialists in the network. Today firms innovate by using only their own inventions. But in collaborative innovation, you don’t need to invent to innovate. You take your partners’ best inventions and transform them into your own innovations. Corporate lawyers will tell you the “P” in Intellectual property stands for protection: you must own and protect it. But in collaborative innovation models, firms are obsessed with return on intellectual capital: so they willingly share and expand their IP with network partners to grow their business. Innovation processes are too rigid to react to changes in customer demand. But collaborative Innovation Networks give you flexible processes that let you and your partners anticipate AND quickly respond to innovation demand – and grab growth opportunities before they vanish Companies today use patents to measure their innovation success. But in the NEW model, inventions – measured by patents – take a back-seat to customer experience, the best indicator of innovation. And lastly, rather than RECEIVING the product of your inventions, customers are embedded in your Innovation network so their insights help shape your innovations. As you can see, the new Model of SHARING, LEVRAGING BEST PRACTICES/BEST OF BREED and Symbiotic partnerships will be the only way for us to achieve the organic growth we all want for our business in the future
  • Porat (1977) noticed the growth in services based on information in his efforts to define the information economy. ------------------- Sources: Porat, M. (1977) The Information Economy: Definitions and Measurements, Special Publication 77 12(1), Office of Telecommunications, US Department of Commerce. Agriculture -&gt; farms (plants and animals, hunting, fishing, mining (harvesting of natural resources) Industry (Goods) -&gt; manufacturing, making things, construction Services (info) -&gt; create info, store &amp; organize info, process info, distribute &amp; communicate information (battle uncertainty – remove risk) Services (other) -&gt; maintenance &amp; repair of people and things (battle entropy – remove decay), transport goods, provide utilities, distribute goods and utility services Mitigate risk, uncertainty Mitigate entropy Time Line: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/telephone/timeline/f_timeline.html Farm Labor: http://www.usda.gov/history2/text3.htm Brief History of Work: http://courses.nus.edu.sg/course/socsja/SC2202/Labor/Occupationsa.html 1800 and the Jeffersonian ideal – citizens as independent and self sufficient 1800 – mobile people called settler (move and stay), conquerors (come in to rule), or sailors (come from afar to trade), changed by 1900 to include travelers -- local travel to family, on business, leisure, schools, medical, government or military service.
  • Here you have a simplified example of an ecosystem for learning regarding K-12 – key participants – connected via an open ICT ecosystem. The power of connecting the players and having them interoperate is obvious. This creates dynamics for innovation in learning that we have never seen before. We have the first great examples where parents are getting involved in the activities of their kids in schools or where local authorities can discover in real time patterns about performance problems in schools and help with the initiation of remedial actions. Or, along the same lines, where governments can receive key policy input about developments in schools across the country, without waiting 2 years to receive a report. However – the interconnection can only be achieved in a sustainable way if based on open standards. Proprietary standards would rather lead towards a world that is “closed” – maybe someone would like to write a book “The world is closed…”. For sure this will not be IBM..!
  • Thank you
  • 1. Lisbon declaration, with emphasis on knowledge 2. In response MS recognised that education &amp; training systems in Europe must reform to meet challenges of a knowledge society. Stockholm Council agreed that emphasis be placed on Quality, Access and Openness 2. Barcelona Council set the aim for Europe to become a worldwide quality reference by 2010 This will be achieved bottom-up, the responsibility being with MS and the regions. The Commission will support this process
  • Enterprises in different industries have applied technology to significantly change the way they do business.
  • Two years ago, we interviewed CEOs at 456 companies in every major industry sector. And, just recently, we completed interviews with 765 such CEOs to dig a little closer and get a better idea of just what’s keeping them up at night. In this latest survey, two-thirds of them said definitively that they’re looking to innovate. But they didn’t all agree about what they needed to innovate. Those who are looking to innovate their business model seemed to feel that products and services can be copied, but the business model is the true differentiator. The business process innovators think that’s the toughest thing for the competition to duplication, so that’s where their competitive advantage will lie. Meanwhile, the product and service innovators are afraid that innovations in processes and business models are too ephemeral for their tastes. And they’re under a lot of pressure, especially, because products and services are, of course, most prone to being turned into commodities.
  • With massive processing power connected by the Internet, easier and more successful integration of enterprises, a wider understanding and acceptance of the need to collaborate, and the new services and service delivery models from new entrants in that market segment... ...it’s now actually possible to create and run a company that can concentrate on the one thing it does best. Our clients can integrate their partners into their business – partners handling everything from supply chain and accounting, to the actual development of the products they sell and the relationship they have with their own customers. This has never been possible before quite to the extent it is now. That’s because every one of these elements, and every other element of a business’s operations, has been broken down into components that can be mixed and matched. That helps an enterprise see which components it should do itself and which it can rely on a partner to contribute. [click to reveal IBM capabilities] And it needs a partner like IBM to help integrate and manage it all, using everything at our disposal, such as the Component Business Model, employing service-oriented architectures, and bringing our various offerings to bear in helping our clients specialize in what differentiates them, and leaving the rest to someone else.
  • In our industry, we’ve perhaps seen this trend in sharper relief than any other, but in fact, collaboration and co-creation are shaping every industry in one way or another, and they represent a huge opportunity for our clients in innovating for their own advantage. For example, this shows all the various answers CEOs gave in our most recent survey as to where they get their best ideas. Notice that they’re seeing almost as many good ideas coming from their business partners as from their employees who work with those partners. And they’re getting about twice as many innovation insights from customers as they are from the sales and service units who work directly with those customers. What they’re realizing -- in some of the ways we’ve learned from our work in open source and open standards, and from many of our joint development projects -- is that they no longer have to create – and own -- everything themselves, as they once believed.
  • William Mougayar, Gobalization 2.0: The future organization is an OPEN CORPORATION. It has a functional architecture that allows it to absorb external touch points in an open manner. Openness means easier business once standards of interaction are adhered to, but it does not mean blindly acquiescing to, or exposing everything. Open means flexibility in aligning priorities, budgets, resources and people to dynamically changing objectives. Open facilitates technical and business integration but it doesn’t resolve it on its own. Open accounting and financial disclosures breed confidence and trust and eases efficient integration and engagement of stakeholders, customers, partners and investors.
  • “ Community of Practice” (Etienne Wenger, 1990s) is a shared domain of interest, where members interact and learn together and develop a shared repertoire of resources. Mobile Learning defines new relationsships and behaviors among learners, information, personal computing devices, and the world at Large (Ellen Wagner, Bryan Alexander)
  • Sustaining Employability - Innovation in Lifelong Learning

    1. 1. Dr. Richard Straub | President of the European eLearning Industry Group | Advisor to the Chairman IBM EMEA [email_address] Sustaining Employability- Innovation in Lifelong Learning EDEN Conference Vienna, Austria June 14 - 17, 2006
    2. 2. eLIG - 23 CO MMERCIAL MEMBERS
    3. 3. <ul><li>AGH-UST Poland </li></ul><ul><li>Austrian Computer Society </li></ul><ul><li>C2k </li></ul><ul><li>CeLeKT - MSI Växjö University </li></ul><ul><li>CEPIS </li></ul><ul><li>EFMD </li></ul><ul><li>European Computer Driving Licence Foundation </li></ul><ul><li>Federation of European Publishers </li></ul><ul><li>Henley Management College </li></ul><ul><li>IMD </li></ul><ul><li>MTA SZTAKI Hungarian academy of Science </li></ul><ul><li>Open University, Netherlands </li></ul><ul><li>University of Ostrava </li></ul><ul><li>University of Reading </li></ul><ul><li>University of St. Gallen/SCIL </li></ul>CONSULTATION GROUP: 15 Members
    4. 4. Skills & Employability – Lifelong Learning as a “Must” <ul><li>Employability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Being equipped with valued skills for real-world job roles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maintaining/Adapting the Skills over ones lifetime </li></ul></ul><ul><li>At the Heart of the Lisbon Agenda </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Competitiveness & Jobs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Education levels and Employment Rates </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Key Questions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Role of Technology to support the Lifelong Learning Process ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Innovation to give new Momentum to e-Learning ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Measures to be taken by Public Sector and Private Players ? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Agenda </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Changes and what they mean for learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Disruptive Learning Innovation” on the Horizon (finally) ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Actions by Public and Private Players </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. The Environment – Accelerating Change Point Solutions Market/Product Expansion Product/Manufacturing Business Values Generations Organizations Technology To From Economy Continuity/Predictability Baby-Boomers Hierarchy/Horizontal Knowledge/Services Growth through Innovation Disruptive Change BAU Multi-Generational Dis-aggregation Convergence Real World Virtual World/Synthetic World Reality
    6. 6. Key findings and conclusions: e-readiness 2006 World more ready than ever – 1 bn internet users/ 2 bn mobile phone users All countries improved scores over past year Europe (West Europe, Nordics) remains dominant <ul><li>Diminishing divide: - Smaller distance between best from rest </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>(dvlpmt of IT outsourcing capabilities, increasing use of </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>open-source software) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li> - Broadband adoption accelerating in North Asia </li></ul></ul>Differentiators: innovation, info security, governments’ commitment to digital development …… measuring the e-bus environment of the world’s 68 largest economies
    7. 7. Worldwide ranking on E-readiness Source: EIU/IBM e-readiness ranking 2006 8.19 Austria ▼ 14 15 8.36 Hong Kong ▼ 6 (tie) 10 ▲ ▲ ▼ ▲ - ▼ ▲ - - Change (Ranks) 8.37 Canada 12 9 8.50 Australia 10 8 8.55 Finland 6 (tie) 7 8.60 Netherlands 8 6 8.64 UK 5 5 8.74 Sweden 3 4 8.81 Switzerland 4 3 8.88 US 2 2 9.00 Denmark 1 1 E-readiness score (of 10) Country 2005 Rank 2006 Rank
    8. 8. High Value Jobs moving into Services Estimations based on Porat, M. (1977) Info Economy: Definitions and Measurement, Augmented with recent data and projections from http://www.bls.gov/
    9. 9. Moving towards a Multigenerational Workforce <ul><li>81% of the business population age 34 or younger are gamers </li></ul><ul><li>Generation X and Y have different Values and Behaviors than Baby Boomers </li></ul><ul><li>No “one Size Fits all” </li></ul>Sources: Merrill Lynch 1999, Beck and Wade, Got Game., Prensky, Digital Game Based Learning Digital Immigrants Digital Natives
    10. 10. “ T he Web was shifting from being a medium, in which information was transmitted and consumed, into being a platform, in which content was created, shared, remixed, repurposed, and passed along. .” Steven Downes <ul><li>Read WEB </li></ul><ul><li>Top Down </li></ul><ul><li>Instructor Control </li></ul><ul><li>Predefined </li></ul><ul><li>Learning Environment = Island </li></ul><ul><li>One-size fits all </li></ul><ul><li>Closed Learning Group </li></ul><ul><li>Privacy </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Computing </li></ul>Write WEB Bottom Up Self Directed Adaptive Window to the Web Individualized Open Learning Ecology Sharing with Community Social Computing Will eLearning 2.0 fulfill the Promise of e-Learning 1.0 ? Disruptive Innovation – “The Liberation of the Learner” ?
    11. 11. Not so fast……the new World will be “blended” – the 4 Cs <ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><ul><li>High Quality and Open Source/Self-made </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialized quality content scarce and costly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>IP and Copyrights to be reinforced besides “Openness” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trusted Sources and Wikis, Blogs, Vlogs etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Communities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Chat-communities vs. professionally targeted communities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumer-Groups/Lobbies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Closed Groups with high professional specialization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Expert-Advice via IM-based Communities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Control </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Blending of Push and Pull </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Common Core Programs/Content” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Certified Quality </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quality Standards emerging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EFQUEL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>CEL (EMFD) </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. However – eLearning 2.0 Offers important new Capabilities <ul><li>Need to be “tamed” and leveraged </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adaptation for Multiple Generational needs (Yers vs. Baby Boomers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Collaborative Work Environments – Collaborative Innovation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Enabling the Knowledge Worker/Knowledge Entrepreneur </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Specialized Knowledge/Communities/Search Engines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Closed Groups with high professional specialization </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Converging Devices and new Content Options adapted to Learner Needs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Podcasting gaining momentum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Micro-Media and Microlearning emerging (ARC/Research Studios Austria engaged) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Virtual Realities/Synthetic Worlds/Simulations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gaming Generation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MMOG – Potential for Game-Based Learning </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. An Open ICT Ecosystem – foundation for Interoperability Connected via an Open ICT Ecosystem Policies Strategies Processes Technologies Open Standards Open Source Teacher / Administrator Parent Student Local Authority Government Classroom Business Higher Education
    14. 14. How to achieve “Sustained Employability” <ul><li>Development of Human Resource Strategies at Country/Region Level </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Understanding/Anticipating changing Skills/Needs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong Industry Involvement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Early Identifications of Gaps/Shortages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Yearly Action Plans as part of i2010 plans </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Targeted Research Funding and EU and Country Level </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Generational Requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Collaborative Work Environments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adaptive Technologies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Applied Research in Lifelong Learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Living Labs” as opposed to traditional Labs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Co-Creation processes between providers and users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Large Scale Demonstrators – capture learning as you go </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stronger coordination in applied learning research – focus on Outputs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leverage EU Funding (Structural Funds and CIP) and local programs </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. How to achieve “Sustained Employability” (cont’d) <ul><li>Improve Formal Education (Quantity and Quality) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Higher Upper Secondary and Tertiary Education – increase in Employment Rates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increase focus on “Soft Skills” (Communication, Team, Learning etc.) without neglecting analytical and problem solving skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cross-Discipline Skills </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Applied Skills as opposed to pure Theory (Gaming/Simulations) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Real World experiences using virtual capabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Higher Weight of real-world experiences in formal qualification </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Increase level of e-Skills for the 21 st Century </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Basic Literacy (Baby Boomer Generation) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advanced and New Skills – Services Science Discipline (Services Science, Management and Engineering) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Labor Market Fexiblity and Learning Incentives/Support </li></ul><ul><li>Support and Develop Quality Schemes </li></ul>
    16. 16. The Challenge – Knowledge Worker Productivity <ul><li>“ The chief economic priority for developed countries is to raise the productivity of knowledge . . . The country that does this first will dominate the twenty-first century economically.” </li></ul>Peter F. Drucker
    17. 18. Innovation as the Engine for Growth and Productivity and Jobs Global Collaborative Cross- Disciplinary Traditional R & D Labs New Technologies Existing Technologies Complexity Openness Speed Products Systems Services Processes Business Models Social knowledge- intensive Innovation “ Living Labs” Real World Context Productivity Growth Well-Being
    18. 19. <ul><li>more critical than ever in the context of a &quot;knowledge based society&quot;. </li></ul><ul><li>- pays off for all concerned – the state, the employer and the individual. </li></ul>Investment in Learning Examples <ul><li>- Knowledge-based economy and expansion of the services sector make human </li></ul><ul><li>capital central to increasing employment, labour productivity & growth. </li></ul><ul><li>- Investment in ICTs, innovation, physical infrastructure etc. cannot be efficient </li></ul><ul><li>without well-educated, skilled and adaptable workforce. </li></ul>- 1960 – 1990: investment in human capital in the EU accounted for 22% of productivity growth and 45% of the productivity differential (sample average in 1990). Schooling investment has very strong impact on percentages. Direct economic returns of schooling investment compare very well to the returns of physical and financial investment. Source: Europa
    19. 20. The Lisbon Strategy – Education as a Core Element <ul><li>“ Europe to become a worldwide quality reference in education & training by 2010 ” </li></ul><ul><li> Barcelona European Council, March 2002 </li></ul>“ Strategic goals for education & training: Quality, Access and Openness to the wider world ” Stockholm European Council, March 2001 “… the most competitive and dynamic knowledge-based economy in the world, capable of sustainable economic growth with more and better jobs and greater social cohesion ” Lisbon European Council, March 2000
    20. 21. Investment in Learning Examples <ul><li>- Better skills - better wages. </li></ul><ul><li>Return to investment for one additional year of school or training: </li></ul><ul><li>about 6.5% - 9 % increased salary </li></ul>- Extra year at intermediate level of education increases aggregate productivity by about 6.2% (by a further 3.1% in long term) - Investment in human capital is direct source of innovation and long-term competitiveness Source: Europa
    21. 22. Education as the key factor for skills and employment <ul><li>Lisbon target 2000: employment rate from around 62% to 70% </li></ul><ul><li>by the year 2010. </li></ul>Increase in investment in schooling Source: CEPS Policy Brief Nr., 93 - 02/2006, Daniel Gros, Employment and Competitiveness, “The Key Role of Education” More education Higher employment Higher growth rate More education More KN Workers More R&D spending More research More innovation <ul><li>2006 - Improvement in employment rates due to </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>upgrading of skill level: from 62 % to 64-5% </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>- Employment rate for those with less than upper </li></ul><ul><li> secondary skill levels higher than in US </li></ul>
    22. 23. Overview <ul><li>Change becoming the only constant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology “flattening” the world </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Incremental change and disruptive change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Growth and competitiveness through innovation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Innovation in Business, Economy and Society </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowledge-intensive Services and new Business Models </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Organizations becoming “fluid’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From “free Enterprise” to “Enterprise free” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiating capabilities vs. Non- Core </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Hollywood Studios System” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The Collaboration Imperative </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Workforce Skills and Learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Education levels and employment rates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lifelong Learning for different generations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New working and learning environments for ubiquitous and adaptive learning </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Recommendations for Research and Deployment </li></ul>think inside-out
    23. 24. <ul><li>Problems </li></ul><ul><li>- Structural change and productivity growth require a continued investment in </li></ul><ul><li>a highly skilled and adaptable workforce . </li></ul><ul><li>- Economies endowed with a skilled labor force are better able to create and </li></ul><ul><li>make effective use of new technologies, such as ICT. </li></ul><ul><li>- The share of working population that has completed tertiary education. </li></ul><ul><li>- Educational attainment in Europe falls short of what might be required to </li></ul><ul><li>ensure that skills are available in the labor market and that new knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>is produced that is subsequently diffused across the economy. </li></ul>Increase Investment in human capital through better education and skills
    24. 25. The CIP comprises three sub-programmes: The Entrepreneurship and Innovation Programme, the ICT Policy Support Programme the Intelligent Energy Europe Programme. SMEs Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme <ul><li>Innovation activities : Support of poles of excellence and to the provision of services to enterprises. For example through: </li></ul><ul><li>-fostering sector-specific innovation, clusters, networks of excellence, public-private innovation partnerships and cooperation with relevant international organisations, and the use of innovation management; </li></ul><ul><li>-supporting national/regional programmes for business innovation; </li></ul><ul><li>-supporting the demonstration of innovative technologies; </li></ul><ul><li>-supporting services for trans-national knowledge and technology transfer and for intellectual and industrial property management; </li></ul><ul><li>-exploring new types of innovation services; </li></ul><ul><li>-facilitating technology transfer through data archiving and relays. </li></ul>
    25. 26. <ul><li>Actions will aim at: </li></ul><ul><li>- promoting innovation in processes, services and products enabled by ICT, </li></ul><ul><li>notably in SMEs and public services, taking into account the necessary skills </li></ul><ul><li>requirements; </li></ul><ul><li>- facilitating public and private interaction as well as partnerships for accelerating </li></ul><ul><li>innovation and investments in ICTs; </li></ul><ul><li>- promoting and raising awareness of the opportunities and benefits that ICT and </li></ul><ul><li>its new applications bring to citizens and businesses, including strengthening </li></ul><ul><li>confidence in and openness to new ICT, and stimulating debate at the European </li></ul><ul><li>level on emerging ICT trends and developments. </li></ul>Stimulating innovation through the wider adoption of and investment in ICTs Competitiveness and Innovation Framework Programme
    26. 27. Innovation in Learning – Sharing and Collaboration Community Building between CLOs <ul><li>Corporate Learning Improvement Program – Platform </li></ul><ul><li>for Corporate Universities </li></ul><ul><li>CEL – Technology Enhanced Learning – Program </li></ul><ul><li>Accreditation </li></ul>
    27. 28. 
    28. 29. The next big thing: Innovation “ We will fight our battles not on the low road to commoditization, but on the high road of innovation.” Howard Stringer, Chairman and CEO, Sony Corporation Oct. 4, 2005 <ul><li>“ Innovation continues to be a key driver in the success of our business.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tom Taylor, Executive VP </li></ul></ul>“ Electronics Industry Lacks Innovation, Philips CEO Charges” EE Times , Sept. 27, 2005 &quot;Constant reinvention is the central necessity at GE..“ Jeffrey Immelt Chairman and CEO, GE “ More and more CEOs are adopting an innovation agenda.” Sam Palmisano IBM Board of Advisors Oct. 13, 2005
    29. 30. “ Economic competition in the flat world will be more equal and more intense... the most important attribute you can have is creative imagination .” - Thomas Friedman <ul><li>One-way customer relations </li></ul><ul><li>Ivory-towered R&D labs </li></ul><ul><li>Organizational silos </li></ul><ul><li>Risk-averse top management </li></ul><ul><li>Unskilled partners </li></ul><ul><li>Limited local talent </li></ul>Market irrelevant inventions Slow rate of invention No collaborative idea generation Eschews radical innovation Fail to keep pace with innovation Slow the innovation cycles The increase demand for technology innovation can’t be met by firms’ weak supply-side capabilities A new business model for innovation is needed
    30. 31. Reinventing ways of doing business Instant, in-store promotions are based on real-time view of customer buying behaviors and inventory levels Stores offered same promotions across all stores, based on a predetermined schedule Retail Customs agencies know exact location, origin and contents of containers in a matter of seconds It took customs agencies hours to determine the location, origin and contents of containers arriving at their ports Government Horizontal integration of processes taking product launch down to 8 weeks Launch of new credit product taking up to 7 months Financial Services Collaboration across entire supply chain accelerates root cause analysis, resolving warranty claims 5 days faster. Lack of collaboration between OEMs, suppliers and dealers slowed processing of warranty claims Automotive Passengers can print their own boarding passes at home Passengers waited in line at airport to get boarding pass Airlines Auto insurance rates based on driving and usage patterns Auto insurance rates were based on fixed premiums Insurance On Demand Business Traditional business model Industry
    31. 32. Overview of the rankings, methods and changes <ul><li>E-readiness, now in its seventh year of publication, is defined as in indication how amenable a national market is to Internet-based opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>The ranking evaluates the technological, economic, political & social assets of 68 countries and their cumulative impact on respective information economies </li></ul><ul><li>The rankings are based upon nearly 100 quantitative and qualitative criteria, organized in six distinct categories*: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connectivity & technology infrastructure Availibility, affordibility, quality & reliability of telephony services, personal computers & the Internet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business Environment Expected attractiveness of the general business environment over the next five years </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumer & business adoption Prevalence of e-business practices in the country </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Legal & policy environment The country’s overall legal framework and specific laws governing Internet use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social & cultural environment Pre-conditions for applying e-business, like literacy, education, Internet experience, and entrepreneurial attitude </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supporting e-Services Presence of intermediaries and ancillary services like standards, consulting & IT services, and back-office solutions </li></ul></ul>* See appendix for the detailed criteria
    32. 33. Has e-Learning gone Mainstream ? <ul><li>E-readiness, now in its seventh year of publication, is defined as in indication how amenable a national market is to Internet-based opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>The ranking evaluates the technological, economic, political & social assets of 68 countries and their cumulative impact on respective information economies </li></ul><ul><li>The rankings are based upon nearly 100 quantitative and qualitative criteria, organized in six distinct categories*: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connectivity & technology infrastructure Availibility, affordibility, quality & reliability of telephony services, personal computers & the Internet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business Environment Expected attractiveness of the general business environment over the next five years </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumer & business adoption Prevalence of e-business practices in the country </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Legal & policy environment The country’s overall legal framework and specific laws governing Internet use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social & cultural environment Pre-conditions for applying e-business, like literacy, education, Internet experience, and entrepreneurial attitude </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supporting e-Services Presence of intermediaries and ancillary services like standards, consulting & IT services, and back-office solutions </li></ul></ul>* See appendix for the detailed criteria
    33. 34. pressures and opportunities <ul><li>2 out of 3 CEOs said they have to bring about fundamental change in the next 2 years </li></ul>innovation: why? products/ services/markets operations (processes & functions) business model CEOs said they must achieve... and want to innovate their... 2004 2006 IBM Institute for Business Values (IBV) CEO Study 2004, multiple answers permitted IBV CEO Study 2006, top answer shown revenue growth cost reduction asset utilization risk management 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%
    34. 35. In 2006, CEOs are looking to innovation to drive fundamental change that enables sustainable growth, but . . . Extent of Fundamental Change Needed Over the Next Two Years Past Level of Success at Managing Fundamental Change . . . their track record for managing fundamental change is not stellar A lot of change 65% Moderate change 22% Little or no change 13% No change experience 5% Little to no success 15% Some success 33% Successful 32% Very successful 15%
    35. 36. innovation: how? From free Enterprise to “Enterprise Free” Forrester; IDC; IBM “ Building an Edge ,” Vol 5, No. 8; Moore & Cabot Capital Markets/Dow Jones ; Gartner/Wireless News asset-based services application hosting service-oriented architectures ...and more Component Business Model once hype, now reality <ul><li>“ Flat World”-effect – Impact of Networks, high bandwidth and Skills availability </li></ul><ul><li>Worldwide spending on business process outsourcing is projected to grow 11 percent annually through 2008. </li></ul>business broken into component pieces <ul><li>Differentiating Components and non-Differentiating and Core vs. Non-core </li></ul><ul><li>Dynamic Optimizing/Rearranging the components – bringing in the best capabilities </li></ul><ul><li>“ Hollywood Studio System” </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge Workers/Knowledge Entrepreneurs with high specialization </li></ul>
    36. 37. innovation: how? new forms of collaboration IBM Institute for Business Value, CEO Study 2006 CEOs: Sources of new ideas and innovation “ We have...today a lot more capability and innovation in the [competitive] marketplace...than we [could] try to create on our own.” Business partners Customers Consultants Competitors Associations, trade groups, conference boards Academia Internet, blogs, bulletin boards Think tanks Other R&D (internal) Sales or service units Employees (general population) 5% 15% 25% 35% 45% 45% 35% 25% 15% 5%
    37. 38. Trends in the ONLINE World Openness Changing nature of Internet users <ul><li>Information meant to be shared </li></ul><ul><li>-File and Open source Software </li></ul><ul><li>-Creative Commons licenses </li></ul><ul><li>-Open Access to scholarly & other works </li></ul><ul><li>Hoarding of content as antisocial </li></ul><ul><li>Open society / Open corporation </li></ul>Source: E-learning 2.0, Stephen Downes, Nat. Research Council of Canada, eLearn Magazine <ul><li>“ Digital natives” (Marc Prensky) </li></ul><ul><li>“ n-gen” (Don Tapscott) </li></ul><ul><li>Self-government of Internet users – </li></ul><ul><li>better informed, active, engaged </li></ul><ul><li>“ Augmented Learners “ (Jay Cross) </li></ul><ul><li>Networked markets </li></ul>Learner-centered learning <ul><li>Active learning (emphasis on </li></ul><ul><li>creation, participation, communication) </li></ul><ul><li>Distinction between teacher and learner </li></ul><ul><li>collapsing </li></ul>Consumer/Client- centered culture
    38. 39. eLearning Transformation: E-Learning 2.0 – A social revolution Source: E-learning 2.0, Stephen Downes, Nat. Research Council of Canada, eLearn Magazine <ul><li>E-Learning application as a </li></ul><ul><li>personal learning center, similar to </li></ul><ul><li>a blogging tool or an ePortfolio . </li></ul><ul><li>Content more likely to be produced </li></ul><ul><li>by students than courseware </li></ul><ul><li>authors </li></ul><ul><li>Learning as a creative activity </li></ul><ul><li>Games </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Workflow learning </li></ul>“ The challenge will not be in how to learn, but in how to use learning to create something more, to communicate” From To Medium for Social Networking Platform in which learning content is created, shared, remixed, reused, according to the student’s own needs and interests <ul><li>Slow uptake of Communities of practice limited to a given group of learners, as university class </li></ul>
    39. 40. Summary <ul><li>Innovation is becoming the critical determinant of success in the information economy </li></ul><ul><li>The economics of the information economy shift the balance towards more and more engagement in collaborative processes such as open communities </li></ul><ul><li>The use of open communities is expanding from software into hardware with communities like Power.Org </li></ul><ul><li>Developing successful models of engagement with open communities will be critical to leverage these new economics of collaboration </li></ul><ul><li>These new business drivers will place demands on the technology community to deliver innovation </li></ul>

    ×