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Creating environments for learner centered learning: Paving the way for hyflex

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Presentation of Lisa Marie Blaschke, for EDEN's European Online and Distance Learning Week on 'Stepping up to the plate! How technology has supported ODL during and after the pandemic' - Thursday, 4 November 2021: 11:00 CET
More info:
https://www.eden-online.org/eden_conference/stepping-up-to-the-plate-how-technology-has-supported-odl-during-and-after-the-pandemic/

Presentation of Lisa Marie Blaschke, for EDEN's European Online and Distance Learning Week on 'Stepping up to the plate! How technology has supported ODL during and after the pandemic' - Thursday, 4 November 2021: 11:00 CET
More info:
https://www.eden-online.org/eden_conference/stepping-up-to-the-plate-how-technology-has-supported-odl-during-and-after-the-pandemic/

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Creating environments for learner centered learning: Paving the way for hyflex

  1. 1. Creating environments for learner-centered learning: Paving the way for hyflex Dr. Lisa Marie Blaschke Learnlife Barcelona, Spain
  2. 2. Learnlife values
  3. 3. The pandemic • 24 hours to go online with the learning guides (who were not trained in online teaching) • “Flipped a switch and adapted to it” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yWvF3_NcBdg) • Priority: mental health and wellness of learners, maintaining relationships >> Real Talk • Structure: • Mentor meetings every week >> to re-engage and engage learners • Learning guide (LG) check-in each day • Learners setting own schedule and being self-directed (i.e., identify own peak working hours) • Offline activities as much as possible and focus on community • Family involvement and incorporation of home experiences and resources with online activities • Challenges: lack of social opportunities >> constant iterations • Technologies used: Google Suite of apps, Monday.com, BaseCamp, Zoom, WhatsApp, E-mail, Miro
  4. 4. The goal of hyflex “HyFlex” courses allow students to seamlessly shift between attending class in person, joining in synchronously online, or catching the class asynchronously later – and they can change their mind, fluidly, from day to day. Ken Steele (2020), http://eduvation.ca/2020/05/hyflex-learning/ Design principles: Learner choice, equivalency, reusability, accessibility (Beatty, 21019, https://edtechbooks.org/hyflex); lacks the ingredients of empathy, trust, and respect
  5. 5. Ingredients for hyflex success • Learner-centered learning environments that promote learner agency and are based on positive personal relationships characterized by empathy, trust and mutual respect • Self-determined and self-directed learners with teachers as guides • Co-creation of learning experiences and pathways based on learners’ interests and passions (intrinsic motivation) • Flexible and accessible technology choice based on pedagogical need
  6. 6. Why it works for Learnlife • Learner-centered teaching and learning grounded in the research • Paradigm: https://www.learnlife.com/learning-paradigm • Learning methodologies: https://www.learnlife.com/methodologies • Agile technology, selected based on need and pedagogical purpose • Community (e.g., Alliance Network, https://alliance.learnlife.com/) • Vision: Learners, schools, hubs, hublings, and communities connected to created a global network of learning
  7. 7. The pathway ahead Scenarios are fictional sets of alternative futures. They do not contain predictions or recommendations. Imagining multiple scenarios recognises that there is not only one pathway into the future, but many. Chapter Two provides an overview of strategic foresight, highlighting three main benefits: 1) to reveal and test assumptions, 2) stress-test and future-proof plans, and 3) generate shared visions of the future to support action in the present. The chapter sets out key steps for using the scenarios, including questions for identifying implications and taking strategic action. The four OECD Scenarios for the Future of Schooling OECD s c e n ar i o s f o r t h e f u t u r e o f s c h o o l i n g Participation in formal education continues to expand. International collaboration and technological advances support more individualised learning. The structures and processes of schooling remain. Traditional schooling systems break down as society becomes more directly involved in educating its citizens. Learning takes place through more diverse, privatised and flexible arrangements, with digital technology a key driver. EDUCATION OUTSOURCED SCHOOLING EXTENDED LEARN-AS-YOU-GO Education takes place everywhere, anytime. Distinctions between formal and informal learning are no longer valid as society turns itself entirely to the power of the machine. Schools remain, but diversity and experimentation have become the norm. Opening the “school walls” connects schools to their communities, favouring ever- changing forms of learning, civic engagement and social innovation. SCHOOLS AS LEARNING HUBS

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