Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

National Skills Strategy Slovenia - Launch of the Diagnostic Report

405 views

Published on

Building the right skills can help countries improve economic prosperity and social cohesion, by contributing to social outcomes such as health, civil and social engagement, by supporting improvement in productivity and growth and by supporting high levels of employment in good quality jobs.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

National Skills Strategy Slovenia - Launch of the Diagnostic Report

  1. 1. National Skills Strategy Slovenia Launch of the Diagnostic Report Andreas Schleicher Director for Education and Skills, OECD 26 June 2017, Ljubljana
  2. 2. Directorate for Education and Skills Economics Department Directorate for Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation Centre for Tax Policy and Administration Directorate for Public Governance and Territorial Development Local Economic and Employment Development OECD GOVERNMENT OF SLOVENIA Building a collaborative approach Ministry of Labour, Family, Social Affairs and Equal Opportunities Ministry of Finance Ministry of Education, Science and Sport Ministry of Economic Development and Technology Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning Ministry of Health Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Food Ministry of Public Administration Office for Development and European Cohesion Bringing Ministries together…
  3. 3. Drawing upon the insights of stakeholders
  4. 4. OECD Skills Strategy Developing, activating and using skills for greater economic prosperity and social cohesion
  5. 5. Context Skills to thrive in an increasingly interconnected and rapidly changing world
  6. 6. The kind of things that are easy to teach are now easy to automate, digitize or outsource
  7. 7. Robotics
  8. 8. >1m miles, one minor accident, occasional human intervention
  9. 9. Augmented reality
  10. 10. Jobs are increasingly vulnerable to technological displacement Share of workforce using general cognitive skills at or below level of computer capabilities 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 % Computer capabilities in 2016 Additional capabilities projected for 2026 Source: Elliott, S. (forthcoming), “Computers and the future of skill demand”.
  11. 11. Global Value Chains Value added The Smiling Curve 11 R&D Design Logistic purchase Production Assembling Logistic s Market ing Service s Pre-production Upstream activities Post-production Downstream activities Production Value chain activities
  12. 12. 12 Gap in job quality between high-skilled and low-skilled workers and participation in global value chains More educated workers enjoy better job quality AUT BEL CZE DNK EST FIN FRA DEU GRC HUN IRL ITA LUX NLD NOR POL PRT SVK SVNESP SWE TUR GBR 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Gap in the quality of the working environment between high-skilled and low-skilled workers Backward participation in GVCs, % In countries more integrated in global markets, the gap in job quality between educated and less educated workers is bigger Source: OECD calculations based on OECD Job Quality Database and OECD Trade in Value Added database (TiVA).
  13. 13. Slovenia has an ambitious vision for the future A society where people: …learn throughout and for life …are innovative …trust one another …enjoy a high quality of life …embrace their identity and culture. Vision of Slovenia 2050
  14. 14. Strengthening Slovenia’s skills system 7. Inclusive and effective governance of the skills system 8. Enabling better decisions through improved skills information 9. Financing and taxing skills equitably and efficiently Activating skills supply 3. Boosting employment for all age- groups 4. Attracting and retaining talent from Slovenia and abroad Using skills effectively 5. Making the most of people’s skills in workplaces 6. Using skills for entrepreneurship and innovation Developing relevant skills 1. Equipping young people with skills for work and life 2. Improving the skills of low-skilled adults Slovenia’s main skills challenges
  15. 15. Developing skills Challenge 1: Equipping young people with skills for work and life
  16. 16. 100 80 60 40 20 0 20 40 Turkey Chile Israel Poland Ireland England (UK) Japan Slovenia Denmark Australia New Zealand Czech Republic Flanders (Belgium) Sweden Korea Level 2 Level 3 Level 2 Level 3 Young adults (16-24 year-olds) Older adults (55-65 year-olds) % Medium to advanced digital problem- solving skills Source: OECD Survey of Adult Skills database (PIAAC) (2012, 2015)
  17. 17. Low-performing and disadvantaged students are concentrated in vocational programmes Share of 15-year-old students in vocational and general education who are low performers (level 1 or below) in mathematics, 2012 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 % Enrolled in a vocational programme Enrolled in a general programme Source: OECD (2013), PISA 2012 Results: Excellence through Equity: Giving Every Student the Chance to Succeed (Volume II), PISA, OECD Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264201132-en.
  18. 18. Vocational students also lack funding to develop skills for the future Annual expenditure per student by education level 0 2000 4000 6000 8000 10000 12000 14000 16000 18000 Early childhood (level 0) Primary (level 1) Lower secondary (level 2) General upper secondary (level 3) Vocational upper secondary (level 3) Short-cycle tertiary (level 5) Bachelor's and above (levels 6-8) $ Slovenia OECD - average Source: OECD calculations based on data from Educational finance indicators database (http://dotstat.oecd.org/Index.aspx?DataSetCode=EAG_FIN_RATIO_CATEGORY).
  19. 19. Slovenia’s higher education system could be more responsive to the economy’s skills needs Share of employers ‘very satisfied’ with graduates’ skill levels 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% % Slovenia OECD - average (31 countries) Source: European Commission (EC) and Gallup Organisation (2010), Employers' Perception of Graduate Employability, Flash Eurobarometer No. 304.
  20. 20. Developing skills Challenge 2: Improving the skills of low-skilled adults
  21. 21. One-third of adults has low levels of skills Share of adults with low literacy and/or numeracy proficiency, by age 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-65 % Slovenia OECD – average Slovenia overall Source: OECD calculations based on OECD (2017) OECD Survey of Adult Skills database (PIAAC) (2012, 2015), www.oecd.org/skills/piaac/ (accessed March 2017).
  22. 22. Relatively few low-skilled adults participate in adult learning Share of adults (25-65 year-olds) participating in formal or non-formal education 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 % Levels 4 or 5 Level 1 and below Source: OECD calculations based on OECD (2017) Survey of Adult Skills database (PIAAC) (2012, 2015), www.oecd.org/skills/piaac/ (accessed March 2017).
  23. 23. Developing skills: Recommended areas for action …upper-secondary students develop high levels of skills …higher education system responsive to skills needs …motivating low-skilled adults to improve their skills …flexible adult learning and validation of prior learning
  24. 24. Activating skills Challenge 3: Boosting employment for all age groups
  25. 25. Very few older people in Slovenia are in paid employment Employment rates of 55-64 year-olds, OECD countries, 2015 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 % Source: OECD calculations based on OECD (2017) Employment Database (LFS by sex and age), www.oecd.org/employment/database.
  26. 26. A growing number of youth are not in employment, education or training Share of young adults (15-29 year-olds) Not in Employment, Education or Training (NEET), 2007 and 2015 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Italy Slovak Republic Hungary Slovenia OECD – average United Kingdom Austria Netherlands % 2015 2007 Source: Youth not in employment, education or training (NEET) (indicator), http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1787/72d1033a-en (accessed on 2 December 2016).
  27. 27. High employment costs, cost jobs Income tax plus employee and employer social security contributions (SSC) as a share of labour costs, single worker no children average wages, 2015 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 % Income tax Employee SSC Employer SSC Source: OECD (2016c), Taxing Wages 2016, OECD Publishing, Paris, www.dx.doi.org/10.1787/tax_wages-2016-en.
  28. 28. Activating skills Challenge 4: Retaining and attracting talent from Slovenia and abroad
  29. 29. “Brain drain” is low today, but it is growing Emigration numbers, by education level, Slovenia, 2011-2015 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Emigrants: Upper secondary Emigrants: below upper secondary Emigrants: tertiary Source: OECD calculations based on International migration, Statistical Office of the Republic of Slovenia, http://pxweb.stat.si/pxweb/Database/Demographics/Demographics.asp.
  30. 30. Highly skilled adults have relatively low earnings potential in Slovenia Annual net earnings of a single person without children, earning 167% of the average wage, in EUR, 2015 0 20000 40000 60000 80000 100000 120000 € Source: Eurostat (2015) Annual Net Earnings, Data Explorer, http://appsso.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/nui/show.do?dataset=earn_nt_net
  31. 31. Activating skills: Recommended areas for action …strong incentives for people to work and employers to hire …more older adults and long-term unemployed find work …disengaged youth effectively reached and supported …a tax system that doesn’t deter high-skilled workers …third-country nationals have good job prospects …attracting more international students
  32. 32. Using skills Challenge 5: Making the most of people’s skills in workplaces
  33. 33. In contrast to the OECD, large firms make less use of workers’ skills Average use of ICT at work by firm size, Slovenia and OECD 2.0 2.2 2.4 2.6 2.8 3.0 1-10 employees 11-50 employees 51-250 employees 251-1000 employees 1000+ employees Indexofuse Most frequent use = 5 Least frequent use = 0 Slovenia OECD - average Source: OECD calculations based on OECD (2017) OECD Survey of Adult Skills database (PIAAC) (2012, 2015), OECD, Paris, www.oecd.org/skills/piaac/ (accessed March 2017).
  34. 34. High-Performance Work Practices (HPWP) are not prevalent enough Share of jobs with high HPWP and mean HPWP score, all factors, 2012, 2015 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.9 3.0 3.1 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Index% Percentage of jobs with high HPWP (left) Mean HPWP index (right) Source: OECD (2016a) ), OECD Employment Outlook, OECD Publishing, Paris, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/empl_outlook-2016-en.
  35. 35. Using skills Challenge 6: Using skills for entrepreneurship and innovation
  36. 36. A high and growing share of workers engage in research and development… R&D personnel in employment, in thousands of persons 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 Thousands Total R&D personnel, 2013 Total R&D personnel, 2003 Source: OECD Science, Technology and Industry Scoreboard 2015: Innovation for Growth and Society, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/sti_scoreboard-2015-en.
  37. 37. …yet the public sector’s innovation performance is mixed Index of innovation performance for Slovenia’s universities and public research institutes, 2014 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Publications in the top journals (per GDP) Patents filed by universities and public labs (per GDP) International co-invention (%) Median Bottom 5 OECD values Middle-range OECD Top 5 OECD values Slovenia Min. Max. Source: “Slovenia”, in OECD Science, Technology and Innovation Outlook 2016, OECD Publishing, Paris. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/sti_in_outlook-2016-85-en.
  38. 38. Using skills: Recommended areas for action …diffusing High-Performance Work Practices across workplaces …monitoring and responding to other factors affecting skills use …implementing outstanding reforms to the innovation system …opportunities, skills and attitudes towards entrepreneurship
  39. 39. Strengthening the skills system Challenge 7: Inclusive and effective governance of the skills system
  40. 40. Strengthening the skills system Challenge 8: Enabling better decisions through improved skills information
  41. 41. Slovenians lack good information on skills needs • Slovenia’s skills assessment and anticipation system: • focused on the short-term • reliant on employer surveys • limited sectoral and regional coverage
  42. 42. Strengthening the skills system Challenge 9: Financing and taxing skills equitably and efficiently
  43. 43. Slovenia’s students receive a substantial return to tertiary education Earnings increment necessary to breakeven on a tertiary skills investment, compared to the actual labour market premium for tertiary education 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 % of wage before education Breakeven earnings increment Labour market premium for tertiary education Source: OECD (2017), “Taxation and Skills”, OECD Tax Policy Studies, No. 24, OECD Publishing, Paris.
  44. 44. Yet students contribute relatively little to tertiary education costs Share of private expenditure on tertiary educational institutions, 2013 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 % Source: OECD 2016, Education at a Glance 2016: OECD Indicators, http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/eag-2016-en.
  45. 45. Strengthening the skills system: Recommended areas for action …evaluating government performance in engaging stakeholders …strong capacity and incentives for inter-ministerial collaboration …local engagement and policy tailoring …comprehensive, tailored information on skills needs …boosting financial support for vocational education …funding mechanisms that boost adult learning
  46. 46. From Diagnosis to Action
  47. 47. From Diagnosis to Action ACTION • …? • …? • …? THEMES • Empowering active citizens with the right skills for the future • Building a culture of lifelong learning • Working together to strengthen skills
  48. 48. To discuss OECD’s work with countries on National Skills Strategy projects contact: andreas.schleicher@oecd.org joanne.caddy@oecd.org andrew.bell@oecd.org To learn more about the OECD’s work on skills visit: www.oecd.org/skills/ 48 For further information

×