Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Michael Levine: Learning From Hollywood

682 views

Published on

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Michael Levine: Learning From Hollywood

  1. 1. May 16 and 17, 2011 | USC School of Cinematic Arts Learning from Hollywood Can entertainment media ignite an education revolution?
  2. 2. May 16 and 17, 2011 | USC School of Cinematic Arts
  3. 3. May 16 and 17, 2011 | USC School of Cinematic Arts Ryan Blitstein, SCE Foundation Linda Burch, Common Sense Media Rita Catalano, Fred Rogers Center, SVU Milton Chen, GLEF and Edutopia Kevin Clark, George Mason University Mimi Ito, DML Hub Laird Malamed, Activision Blizzard Krista Marks, Disney Online, Boulder Studios Amy Moynihan, A Squared Entertainment Mary Ann Petrillo, Cisco Judith Pickens, Boys & Girls Clubs of America Michael Robb, Fred Rogers Center, SVU Carla Sanger, LA’s Best Andrea Taylor, Microsoft Damian Thorman, Knight Foundation Esther Wojcicki, Creative Commons Thank you!
  4. 4. May 16 and 17, 2011 | USC School of Cinematic Arts Rebecca Herr-Stephenson, Forum Director Caitlin Skopac, Event Coordinator Ingrid Erickson, Action Team Coordinator Pam Abrams, Director, Partnerships&Strategy Special thanks to:
  5. 5. … there is a quiet crisis in the United States that we have to wake up to. The U.S. today is in a truly global environment, and our competitor countries are not only wide awake, they are running a marathon while we are running sprints. — Thomas L. Friedman, The World Is Flat (2005) “ ”
  6. 6. The U.S. has fallen behind as a leader in a globalized economy Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), 2009. United States Science Score 502
  7. 7. The U.S. has fallen behind as a leader in a globalized economy Source: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), 2009. United States Math Score 487
  8. 8. Literacy: America’s overlooked innovation challenge Source: NAEP, 2008 Average Score Year National Fourth Grade Reading Scores
  9. 9. Source: The LIFE Center: Stevens, R. Bransford, J. & Stevens, A., 2005 School isn’t the only place for learning < 20 percent of K-12 time spent in school
  10. 10. Source: Takeuchi, 2011 School isn’t the only place for learning Government Agencies Mass Media Parents’ Work Digital Media Market Local School System Church, Library, After-school Spaces Home, Parents, Siblings School, Teachers, Peers Digital Media Spaces Attitudes & Ideologies of the Culture The Neighborhood
  11. 11. Learning happens at home,
  12. 12. … in after-school centers,
  13. 13. and between family members.
  14. 14. Quality Time, Redefined April 29, 2011 The modern family ecology
  15. 15. The modern family ecology Quality Time, Redefined April 29, 2011
  16. 16. Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010 8- to 18-year-olds Joan Ganz Cooney Center, 2011 0- to 11-year-olds Digital Media: Threats and Opportunities
  17. 17. Digital Media: Threats and Opportunities Source: Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010
  18. 18. Heaviest media users Source: Kaiser Family Foundation, 2010 Digital Media: Threats and Opportunities
  19. 19. • Television continues to exert a strong hold over young children • Children appear to shift their digital media habits around age 8, when they open their eyes to the world of digital media • Mobile media is the new “it” technology, from handheld video games to portable music players to cell phones Source: Gutnick, Robb, Takeuchi, & Kotler, 2011 Digital Media: Always Connected Joan Ganz Cooney Center, 2011 0- to 11-year-olds
  20. 20. Photo by Flickr user JR_Paris • Mobile media is the next “it” technology, from handheld video games to portable music players to cell phones.
  21. 21. • Family values powerfully shape children’s experiences • Two-thirds of parents restrict kids’ media use on a case-by- case basis • A third of parents have learned something technical from their child • Parents worry about digital media interfering with the healthy development of young children, but most parents don’t believe their own kids are at risk Source: Takeuchi, 2011 Digital Media: Families Matter
  22. 22. Source: Herr-Stephenson, Rhoten, Perkel, & Sims, 2011 Digital Media: Communities Matter • How afterschool programs, libraries, and museums integrate technology and digital practices • How digital practices support participation and learning • How research can drive more effective integration of technology within and across these organizations
  23. 23. Learning from Hollywood: Why we are here The Forum’s goal is to stimulate educational change through collaborative, multi-sector action resulting in the effective deployment of digital media for the nation’s vulnerable children. Essential Question: How can the almost 8 hours a day that kids spend consuming media be viewed as an opportunity for the critical sectors to “pull in the same direction” to create quality content and an effective distribution infrastructure?
  24. 24. Learning from Hollywood: Who we are
  25. 25. Challenge 1: Only one in seven African-American children are considered “proficient” in reading by age 10. We have spent billions of dollars on this national disgrace with only scant progress in 25 years. Can the power of storytelling and the personalization of digital media help solve the 4th grade reading crisis? The Forum Challenges
  26. 26. Challenge 2: America faces a surge from competitor nations who are recruiting top engineers and research scientists, while our own performance in science and math has crested. How can the engagement and technical content of digital media—the ability to blow stuff up—promote learning complex subjects anytime, anywhere to advance STEM literacy? The Forum Challenges
  27. 27. Challenge 3: Access to the blizzard of content that characterizes our Information Age has led many observers to worry about children’s ability to develop unbiased and creative inquiry skills. How can every 4th grader achieve basic digital literacy competence as a down payment on lifelong learning and civic participation? The Forum Challenges
  28. 28. Sifteo cubes • Inspired by MIT research and popular culture • Designed for children under age 12 • Develops literacies needed to compete/cooperate in a global age Three challenges: One response

×