MOOCs
As Social Practice:
The Political Ecology of Online Learning
25th September, 2015
Professor Mark Brown
National Inst...
John Pilger reminds us that despite huge
advancements in technology over the last
50 years, the wealth gap between
develop...
Framing Perspective
2015
“An educational change is neither natural nor
normal, constant nor common as it involves a
deeper struggle over who will w...
“It is theory that
decides what we
can observe…”
Albert Einstein
• Open learning
• Online learning
• Anytime, anywhere learning
E-learning •
Digital learning •
Technology-enhanced learnin...
• Open learning
• Online learning
• Anytime, anywhere learning
Reproduction
• Mass education
• Quality standards
• Educati...
• Open learning
• Online learning
• Anytime, anywhere learning
ReschoolingReproduction
• Monolingual
• Learning for all
• ...
• Open learning
• Online learning
• Anytime, anywhere learning
Deschooling
ReschoolingReproduction
• Monolingual
• Learnin...
Reconception
• Open learning
• Online learning
• Anytime, anywhere learning
Deschooling
ReschoolingReproduction
• Monoling...
The current emphasis on education in change
needs to shift to the language
of education for change.
What type of
education system
do we want new and
emerging technologies and
models of online learning
and teaching to serve...
LEARNING
TO BE
LEARNING
TO KNOW
LEARNING
TO DO
LEARNING
TO LIVE
TOGETHER
Digital
Capability
Digital
Inclusion
Digital
Citi...
Conclusion…
• Social practice
• A gift to educators
• Where do we want to end up?
“MOOCs should
be in the service of
big ideas, not as
a big idea in itself”
(Brown & Costello, 2015;
adapted from Barnett, ...
Thank
You!
MOOCs As Social Practice: The Political Ecology of Online Learning
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MOOCs As Social Practice: The Political Ecology of Online Learning

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Invited opening presentation at International MOOC Conference: Where are MOOCs Going? The Future of Distance Learning. University of Naples Federico II, Naples/Capri, 25th September.

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MOOCs As Social Practice: The Political Ecology of Online Learning

  1. 1. MOOCs As Social Practice: The Political Ecology of Online Learning 25th September, 2015 Professor Mark Brown National Institute for Digital Learning Dublin City University Ireland
  2. 2. John Pilger reminds us that despite huge advancements in technology over the last 50 years, the wealth gap between developed and developing countries has more than doubled. Wicked Problems
  3. 3. Framing Perspective
  4. 4. 2015
  5. 5. “An educational change is neither natural nor normal, constant nor common as it involves a deeper struggle over who will win control of the curriculum” (Evans, 1996, p.25).
  6. 6. “It is theory that decides what we can observe…” Albert Einstein
  7. 7. • Open learning • Online learning • Anytime, anywhere learning E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • Learning Society Knowledge Economy Different interest groups and stakeholders borrow the same ‘language of persuasion’ to legitimize their own hegemonic agenda Major Competing Lenses
  8. 8. • Open learning • Online learning • Anytime, anywhere learning Reproduction • Mass education • Quality standards • Education as commodity • Increased market competition Learning Society Knowledge Economy E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • Different interest groups and stakeholders borrow the same ‘language of persuasion’ to legitimize their own hegemonic agenda Major Competing Lenses
  9. 9. • Open learning • Online learning • Anytime, anywhere learning ReschoolingReproduction • Monolingual • Learning for all • Global curriculum • Education in change • Mass education • Quality standards • Education as commodity • Increased market competition Learning Society Knowledge Economy E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • Different interest groups and stakeholders borrow the same ‘language of persuasion’ to legitimize their own hegemonic agenda Major Competing Lenses
  10. 10. • Open learning • Online learning • Anytime, anywhere learning Deschooling ReschoolingReproduction • Monolingual • Learning for all • Global curriculum • Education in change • Mass education • Quality standards • Education as commodity • Increased market competition • Democratic • Open access • Learning webs • Unbundling learning Learning Society Knowledge Economy E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • Different interest groups and stakeholders borrow the same ‘language of persuasion’ to legitimize their own hegemonic agenda Major Competing Lenses
  11. 11. Reconception • Open learning • Online learning • Anytime, anywhere learning Deschooling ReschoolingReproduction • Monolingual • Learning for all • Global curriculum • Education in change • Diversity • Just society • Wicked problems • Education for change • Mass education • Quality standards • Education as commodity • Increased market competition • Democratic • Open access • Learning webs • Unbundling learning Learning Society Knowledge Economy E-learning • Digital learning • Technology-enhanced learning • Different interest groups and stakeholders borrow the same ‘language of persuasion’ to legitimize their own hegemonic agenda Major Competing Lenses
  12. 12. The current emphasis on education in change needs to shift to the language of education for change.
  13. 13. What type of education system do we want new and emerging technologies and models of online learning and teaching to serve us in the future?
  14. 14. LEARNING TO BE LEARNING TO KNOW LEARNING TO DO LEARNING TO LIVE TOGETHER Digital Capability Digital Inclusion Digital Citizenship RECONCEPTUALIST FRAMEWORK Fundamental Principles for Reshaping Education
  15. 15. Conclusion… • Social practice • A gift to educators • Where do we want to end up?
  16. 16. “MOOCs should be in the service of big ideas, not as a big idea in itself” (Brown & Costello, 2015; adapted from Barnett, 2011). Final point…
  17. 17. Thank You!

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