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The Library Screen Scene

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Renee Hobbs offered this keynote address to the California School Library Association on February 7, 2020. www.mediaeducationlab.com

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The Library Screen Scene

  1. 1. The Library Screen Scene Renee Hobbs University of Rhode Island Media Education Lab Twitter: @reneehobbs California School Library Association February 7, 2020 City of Industry, CA
  2. 2. How Many American Learners Get Exposed to Media and Information Literacy Education?
  3. 3. How Many American Learners Get Exposed to Media and Information Literacy Education? How often did you discuss: • how to tell if the information you find online is trustworthy • the importance of evaluating the evidence that backs up people’s opinions Kahne, J., & Bowyer, B. (2017). Educating for democracy in a partisan age: Confronting the challenges of motivated reasoning and misinformation. American Educational Research Journal, 54(1), 3-34.) 30%
  4. 4. Literacy changes in response to changes in technology & society
  5. 5. We share meaning through symbols that come in many forms
  6. 6. The Uses of AUDIOVISUAL MEDIA in a Digital Age
  7. 7. Examines the uses of film and media in more than 170 school, public and academic libraries throughout the United States Identifies best practices of film and media literacy education programs, library services, programs, curriculum, and collections Oxford University Press, 2019
  8. 8. Viewing Learning Creating Collecting Connecting The practices of help both learners & teachers use the power of visual media to empower and engage learners
  9. 9. #CSLA www.slido.com How have you used a YouTube video to learn how to do something?
  10. 10. Today, one-third of total public library circulation consists of audiovisual materials COLLECT
  11. 11. Algorithms enable personalization of information, entertainment & persuasive content
  12. 12. Algorithms enable personalization of information, entertainment & persuasive content
  13. 13. The Educational Use of Audiovisual Media is Ubiquitous 99% of respondents say films are being used as part of instruction at least 1 – 5 times per month “Lights Camera Action: How Schools are Using FILM to Unlock 21st Century Outcomes” Swank, 2019
  14. 14. “JUST HIT PLAY & WALK AWAY” VIEW
  15. 15. Restrictive School AV Policies Blocking YouTube Advance permission required from school administrators to use video Rigid reliance on MPAA ratings Selection only from list of permitted films established by administrators Requiring parents to be notified before viewing video  Mandating that a graded assignment must accompany viewing
  16. 16. Changing Formats Pose Challenges 55% of educators say DVD players are being phased out or have already been eliminated at their schools 54% of schools are either blocking or restricting access to personal streaming sites in classrooms “Lights Camera Action: How Schools are Using FILM to Unlock 21st Century Outcomes” Swank, 2019
  17. 17. Out-of-School Remix The Odyssey First Contact Gilded Age Politics Changing Formats Showcase Performances
  18. 18. A majority of students ages 14 - 23 prefer learning from YouTube videos over other activities including in-person group activities, learning apps, games, or reading from printed books. SOURCE: Pearson (2018). Beyond millennials: The next generation of learners. Global Research & Insights and Harris Polling.
  19. 19. Viewing Learning Creating help both learners & teachers use the power of visual media to empower and engage learners
  20. 20. When a teacher draws attention to historical errors, misinformation is actually reinforced Eslick, A. N., Fazio, L. K., & Marsh, E. J. (2011). Ironic effects of drawing attention to story errors. Memory, 19(2), 184-191.
  21. 21. Viewing PAIR SHARE What makes a screening a powerful learning experience?
  22. 22. Viewing PAIR SHARE What makes a screening a powerful learning experience? What makes it a waste of time?
  23. 23. #CSLA www.slido.com What makes a screening a powerful learning experience?
  24. 24. Access to new information & ideas Engage feelings & promote empathy Promote dialogue and discussion Stimulate intellectual curiosity Demonstrate a procedure Appreciate the art of the moving image
  25. 25. Viewing Waste of time Hobbs, Renee. "Non‐optimal uses of video in the classroom." Learning, Media and Technology 31, no. 1 (2006): 35-50. When educators don’t have a clear & compelling purpose and goal
  26. 26. Analyzing YouTube Videos with the SM ARTPHONE Develop critical thinking using ”think aloud” activities MEDIA
  27. 27. Lesson 6: Talking Back to Propaganda. When you demonstrate your ability to comment, critically analyze, and put propaganda in context by creating a short video response, you are using the power of image, language, and sound to convey important ideas. www.mindovermedia.gallery
  28. 28. Mind Over Media A crowdsourced online gallery with 2,500 examples of contemporary propaganda www.mindovermedia.gallery
  29. 29. www.ant.umn.edu
  30. 30. Grade 2 children ask questions to filmmaker Barry Jenkins Hobbs, R. & Moore, D.C. (2013). Discovering Media Literacy. Thousand Oaks CA: Corwin/Sage. VIRTUAL AUTHOR/FILMMAKER VISITS
  31. 31. Viewing Learning Creating help both learners & teachers use the power of visual media to empower and engage learners
  32. 32. Screencasting AdVances Reading Comprehension & FLUENCY Screencast-o-Matic http://screencast-o-matic.com
  33. 33. Media Literacy Programs in Libraries
  34. 34. CREATE Media Literacy Programs in Libraries
  35. 35. Screencasting for Literary Analysis http://screencast-o-matic.com
  36. 36. Flipgrid for Dialogue and Discussion https://flipgrid.com
  37. 37. As you watch, consider: What inferences can you make about how the teacher librarian assessed the learning experience?
  38. 38. How to Take Care of Your Pet Grade 1 Students at Russell Byers Charter School, Philadelphia
  39. 39. ASSESSMENT Dialogue. Shares ideas and listens to others in brainstorming ideas. Creativity. Generates novel ideas for depicting “how to” processes. Collaboration. Participates actively in a production role in front or behind the scenes. Citizenship. Explains the value of sharing knowledge with a target audience in order to benefit both animals and people.
  40. 40. New Canaan CT High School Library YouTube Channel
  41. 41. Empowerment Harness the Emotional Power of Media Build Connections to Others Through Media Use Media to Activate Intellectual Curiosity
  42. 42. Protection Balance Media & Technology Use with Other Forms of Play & Learning Guard Against Exposure to Potentially Harmful Content Develop Coping and Resilience Strategies for Handling Problematic Situations
  43. 43. The Empowerment Protection Spiral
  44. 44. Viewing Learning Creating
  45. 45. Viewing Learning Creating Collecting Connecting
  46. 46. COLLECT
  47. 47. Compared to reviews of print media, there are fewer resources available to help teacher librarians select audiovisual content COLLECT https://providencechildrensfilmfestival.org/films/
  48. 48. Sharing Practices on YouTube Help to Build a Knowledge Community
  49. 49. CONNECT
  50. 50. DIGITAL MEDIA INFORMATION LITERACY ANALYZE ACCESS ACT REFLECT CREATE Inquiry Reading Search Curation Credibility Analysis Creativity Multimodal Writing Digital Skills Dialogue Collaboration Emotional Response Ethical Reasoning Knowledge of Cultural, Political, Economic & Social Context Citizenship Activism
  51. 51. COMPETITIONS & COnTESTS Global Student Voice www.studentvoice.org Open to children ages 5 – 18 from anywhere in the world. Theme: “In Another’s Shoes”
  52. 52. How are students viewing, learning and creating at your school? How are you collecting and connecting to maximize the power of audiovisual media? What potential value and impact might such activities have for your school community?
  53. 53. Renee Hobbs Director, Media Education Lab Co-Director, Graduate Certificate Program in Digital Literacy Harrington School of Communication & Media University of Rhode Island Email: hobbs@uri.edu Twitter: @reneehobbs LEARN MORE Web: www.mediaeducationlab.com

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