Networking2011

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Networking2011

  1. 1. Networking 101For the Financial Individual<br />Presented By The Marketing Department of Penn Mutual<br />
  2. 2. What is Networking?<br />–noun<br />1. a supportive system of sharing information and services among individuals and groups having a common interest.<br />
  3. 3. Networking Involves:<br />Establishing goals.<br />Analyzing the type of assistance you will need to achieve your goals.<br />Developing your people skills.<br />Building and cultivating your network.<br />Maintaining your network through the years.<br />
  4. 4. The Law of 250<br />Research information about your potential network contact and his/her field.<br />Decide what information you would like to obtain from your contact and prepare a list of questions you would like to have answered (see “Guide to Informational Interviewing” for sample questions).<br />Remember that you are representing yourself.<br />Every person knows at least 250 other people.<br />Each of your contacts knows at least 250 people. So that’s 62,500 at your 2nd level.<br />Each of your 2nd level contacts knows 250 people - and that’s over 15,000,000!1st Step to Networking<br />Assess your own interests, skills, knowledge areas, and personal attributes. Take stock so you can speak about yourself with enthusiasm.<br />
  5. 5. The Layers of Separations <br />You<br />Level 1<br />Contact<br />Level 2<br />Contact<br />Level 3<br />Contact<br />Level 4<br />Contact<br />Your Friend<br />“A”<br />“A” ’sUncle<br />“D”<br />“D” ’sFriend<br />“R”<br />“R” ‘sBoss<br />“D”<br />
  6. 6. Understanding Level 1 Contacts<br />Family/Friends<br />Friends of Family/Neighbors<br />Classmates/Alumni<br />Contacts from Special Interest Groups (e.g., Sorority, Fraternity, Student organizations) <br />Members of your religious congregation<br />People dependant upon networking (e.g., realtors, insurance agents)<br />Former employers/co-workers<br />Recruiters/employers who give presentations on campus.<br />Other job candidates<br />LUC Alumni Sharing Knowledge (LUC-ASK) <br />Professional Associations<br />Contacts in the Career Center<br />Former teachers, current professors and staff<br />
  7. 7. What to Do Before Making Initial Contact<br />Know the purpose of your call/email/inquiry<br />What do you want to know?<br />Know yourself –<br />What are your goals and interests?<br />Know the person and company with whom you are speaking<br />Research the field to avoid asking questions you could answer on your own<br />Develop an introductory script which summarizes your skills, experience and goals<br />Practice your script with a friend or a colleague. <br />Remember to prepare open-ended questions.<br />
  8. 8. 1st Steps to Efficient Networking<br />Assess your own interests, skills, knowledge areas, and personal attributes. Take stock so you can speak about yourself with enthusiasm.<br />Research information about your potential network contact and his/her field.<br />Decide what information you would like to obtain from your contact and prepare a list of questions you would like to have answered (see “Guide to Informational Interviewing” for sample questions).<br />Remember that you are representing yourself and Loyola as a whole.<br />
  9. 9. The Initial Contact<br />Purpose: Set up a meeting to discuss your needs, interests and goals.<br />Level 1 Contacts: Call, e-mail or write a letter.<br />Level 2, 3, etc. Contacts: Send an “Approach” letter followed by a phone call.<br />ATTACH YOUR RESUME AND INDICATE THAT IT’S ONLY FOR REFERENCE<br />
  10. 10. Keep in Mind <br />The same obligations and courtesies that come with traditional face-to-face networking apply to online interactions.<br />Treat people the way you’d like to be treated, both online and offline!<br />Career-related online networking should eventually lead to other forms of contact like phone conversations or in-person meetings.<br />Keep an eye out for alumni and student networking receptions which are also a great way to meet with alumni. <br />
  11. 11. Oh No You Didn’t!- Things Not To Do!<br />Do not ask for a job or internship (ask for advice, information, and other contacts).<br />Do not spam with multiple e-mails or stalk with multiple phone calls. <br />Do not act unprofessionally or negatively.<br />Do not ask your contact to mass distribute your resume. <br />Do not share their contact information with others unless you have permission to do so.<br />
  12. 12. What your Contact can do for You!<br />Ask them:<br />To be part of your personal NETWORK.<br />For advice & input.<br />To recommend their tips for getting a foot in the door in this particular field or industry.<br />To refer you to others who might be able to assist and give advice (ONLY if you are comfortable askin<br />
  13. 13. Types of Networking<br />
  14. 14. Meet Up<br />Meetup.com is the world’s largest network of self-organized clubs and community groups.<br />It makes it easy for anyone to organize a local group or find one of the thousands already meeting up face-to-face.<br />More than 2,000 groups get together in local communities each day, each one with the goal of improving themselves or their communities.<br />Meetup is not about virtual relationships, but face-to-face, honest-to-goodness interaction between neighbors.<br />
  15. 15. LinkedIn<br />Virtual Networking<br />An Up to date Resume & Portfolio<br />Ask for Referrals & recommendations and reach your goal of 250 connections!<br />
  16. 16. Networking by (E-mail or Letter) Technique<br />Your letter should include:<br />A brief introduction and your affiliation with Loyola<br />Why you are writing to this individual; why you are interested in this field or organization <br />A brief statement of your interests and/or experience <br />That you would like to schedule a 15-30 minute meeting with them over the phone or in person<br />That you are asking for information and advice.<br />Information about arrangements for the meeting or call with suggested dates, times and locations.<br />Proofread all of your correspondence and be professional in your tone. Even if this is already an “acquaintance” you should be formal and professional with them.<br />
  17. 17. Telephone Networking<br />Tell them who you are, why you are calling & what you need. Always ask if this is a convenient time to talk.<br />Tell them you don’t expect an immediate answer - ask if you can call them back at a later date.<br />
  18. 18. Networking<br />Etiquette & Tips<br />
  19. 19. Act Professionally <br />Be polite, respectful, and charming!<br />Dress professionally for in-person meetings.<br />Have 10-15 appropriate questions ready to ask for a half hour conversation, (see Networking Guidelines for examples of informational interview questions).<br />Research the people you may meet. This always surprise them & makes you stand out from the masses. <br />Be prepared for the person to ask you about your interests and experiences.<br />Be respectful of the person’s time and keep the conversation short; they will let you know if they have additional time to share. <br />Say “Thank You” at the conclusion of your conversation!<br />
  20. 20. Organizing your Network<br /><ul><li>Contact name, title, company
  21. 21. Address, Phone # & E-Mail address
  22. 22. How you met contact
  23. 23. Date last contacted
  24. 24. Conversation summary
  25. 25. Names of referrals
  26. 26. Date of thank-you note for referrals
  27. 27. Other follow up steps you took</li></ul>Use a spreadsheet or notebook to keep track of contacts and what you discussed:<br />
  28. 28. Common Networking Boo Boo’s <br />Voicemail / Answering Machine – have a professional voicemail message.<br />Social Networking websites – Keep your profile professional. Many people can access your information, even if your privacy settings are set to the maximum!<br />Email address – again, keep it professional! Do not use something like “cutygirl89@hotmail” or “johnny420@yahoo”—those will not make good impressions.<br />Really utilize your Penn Mutual Email.<br />
  29. 29. Great People Skills<br />Be Polite<br />Always remember please, thank you & how do you do’s.<br />Assert yourself positively and confidently.<br />Ask good questions.<br />Be a good listener.<br />Be viewed as knowledgeable or skillful in a particular area.<br />Show interest in being of assistance to others.<br />
  30. 30. The Networking Facts:<br /><ul><li>75% of people get their jobs through networking.
  31. 31. Many positions are filled before they are even posted!
  32. 32. People like to be “heroes”</li></ul>People love to give advice<br />People like being thought of as “experts”<br />Networking is not just asking for help, but agreeing to be helpful in return.<br />
  33. 33. Final Thoughts… <br />Don’t let your “rolodex” gather dust – keep in touch through sending occasional emails, updates, links to articles, etc.<br />Keep your contacts up-to-date on your progress.<br />Always thank people!<br />DON’T STOP NETWORKING!<br />

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