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18 b pics student

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18 b pics student

  1. 1. Gardner’s Art Through the Ages, 12e Chapter 28 The Enlightenment and its Legacy: Art of the Late 18th through the Mid-19th Century Romanticism 1
  2. 2. Key Ideas• Enlightenment brought about rejection of roayl and aristocratic authority. Rococo style was replaced by the neoclassical which perceived more democratic• NeoClassicism inspired by the unearthering of ruins at Pompeii and books of art theorist johann winckelmann• Even if works of art depict current events of contemporary portraits there are frequent classical allusions• The late 18 cent. Was age of ind rev new tech such as cast iron were introduced into arch. And for the first time became more eco to carve from bronze than marble 2
  3. 3. Characteristics of Architecture1. Clever revision of classical princp. Into a modern framework2. Outwardly rojman but effciently laid out for modern life3. Classical arch difffused through palladio symmetry, balance, comp. and order4. Greek and roman columns5. Pediments over entrances and windows6. Domes7. Symmetrical8. Themed 3
  4. 4. Characteristics of Painting1.Stories frm antiquity2.Modern ppl clothed in classical garb 4
  5. 5. Characteristics of Sculpture1.Bronze 5
  6. 6. Napoleonic Europe 1800-1815 6
  7. 7. Romanticism•David attracted many students, very stonglycommitted to classicism•Students gained very thorough classical found. Butwere encouraged to explore artistic identities•Ingres, et al, laid found for Romanticism•Explored realms of the exotic, erotic, and fiction,fantastical, landscape•Ingres- flat linear forms a la greek vase painting•Delacroix, gericault- great break from neoC, criticizedbarbarism•Rosseau is basis; freedom is central to romantics•Path to freedom is through imag. And feeling –opposite of enlightenment idea 7
  8. 8. Figure 28-34 ANTOINE-JEAN GROS, Napoleon at the Pesthouse at Jaffa, 1804. Oilon canvas, approx. 17’ 5” x 23’ 7”. Louvre, Paris. 8
  9. 9. Figure 28-35 ANNE-LOUIS GIRODET-TRIOSON, The Burial of Atala, 1808. Oilon canvas, approx. 6’ 11” x 8’ 9”. Louvre, Paris. 9
  10. 10. Figure 28-36 JEAN-AUGUSTE-DOMINIQUE INGRES, Apotheosis of Homer, 1827.Oil on canvas, approx. 12’ 8” x 16’ 10 3/4”. Louvre, Paris. 10
  11. 11. The Move toward Romanticism• Artist jean 11
  12. 12. Figure 28-37 JEAN-AUGUSTE-DOMINIQUE INGRES, Grande Odalisque, 1814. Oilon canvas, approx. 2’ 11” x 5’ 4”. Louvre, Paris. 12
  13. 13. Figure 28-38 GIOVANNI BATTISTA PIRANESI, Carceri 14, ca. 1750. Etching,second state, approx. 1’ 4” x 1’ 9”. Ashmolean Museum, Oxford. 13
  14. 14. Figure 28-39 HENRY FUSELI, The Nightmare, 1781. Oil on canvas, 3’ 4” x 4’ 2”. TheDetroit Institute of the Arts 14
  15. 15. Figure 28-40 WILLIAM BLAKE,Ancient of Days, frontispiece ofEurope: A Prophecy, 1794. Metalrelief etching, hand colored,approx. 9 1/2” x 6 3/4”. TheWhitworth Art Gallery, TheUniversity of Manchester. 15
  16. 16. Drama, Action, and Color in Spanish Romanticism• drama, action and color in the art of fran. Goya 16
  17. 17. Figure 28-41 FRANCISCO GOYA,The Sleep of Reason ProducesMonsters, from Los Caprichos, ca.1798. Etching and aquatint, 8 1/2” x 6”.Metropolitan Museum of Art, NewYork (gift of M. Knoedler & Co., 1918). 17
  18. 18. Figure 28-42 FRANCISCO GOYA, The Family of Charles IV, 1800. Oil on canvas,approx. 9’ 2” x 11’. Museo del Prado, Madrid. 18
  19. 19. Figure 28-43 FRANCISCO GOYA, The Third of May 1808, 1814. Oil on canvas,approx. 8’ 8” x 11’ 3”. Museo del Prado, Madrid. 19
  20. 20. Figure 28-43 FRANCISCOGOYA, The Third of May 1808,1814. Detail 20
  21. 21. Figure 28-44 FRANCISCO GOYA, SaturnDevouring One of His Children, 1819–1823.Detail of a detached fresco on canvas, full sizeapprox. 4’ 9” x 2’ 8”. Museo del Prado,Madrid. 21
  22. 22. The French Debate: Color vs. Line• the French debate over theoreies realted to color (exprsession) vs lines as appro. To artist expression 22
  23. 23. Figure 28-45 THÉODORE GÉRICAULT, Raft of the Medusa, 1818–1819. Oil oncanvas, approx. 16’ x 23’. Louvre, Paris. 23
  24. 24. Figure 28-46 THÉODOREGÉRICAULT, InsaneWoman (Envy), 1822–1823.Oil on canvas, approx. 2’ 4”x 1’ 9”. Musée des Beaux-Arts, Lyon. 24
  25. 25. Figure 28-47 EUGÈNE DELACROIX, Death of Sardanapalus, 1826. Oil on canvas,approx. 12’ 1” x 16’ 3”. Louvre, Paris. 25
  26. 26. Figure 28-47 EUGÈNEDELACROIX, Death ofSardanapalus, 1826 Detail 26
  27. 27. Figure 28-47 EUGÈNE DELACROIX, Death of Sardanapalus, 1826 Detail 27
  28. 28. Figure 28-48 EUGÈNE DELACROIX, Liberty Leading the People, 1830. Oil oncanvas, approx. 8’ 6” x 10’ 8”. Louvre, Paris. 28
  29. 29. Figure 28-48 EUGÈNEDELACROIX, Liberty Leadingthe People, 1830. Detail 29
  30. 30. Figure 28-48 EUGÈNEDELACROIX, LibertyLeading the People, 1830Detail. 30
  31. 31. Figure 28-49 EUGÈNE DELACROIX, Tiger Hunt, 1854. Oil on canvas, approx. 2’ 5” x3’. Louvre, Paris. 31
  32. 32. Figure 28-50 FRANÇOISRUDE, La Marseillaise, Arcde Triomphe, Paris, France,1833–1836. Approx. 42’ x26’. 32
  33. 33. Figure 28-51 ANTOINE-LOUIS BARYE, Jaguar Devouring a Hare, 1850–1851.Bronze, approx. 1’ 4” x 3’ 1”. Louvre, Paris. 33
  34. 34. Romantic Landscape Painting• interest in the landscape as a independent and respected genre in Germany, England, and the US 34
  35. 35. Figure 28-52 CASPAR DAVID FRIEDRICH, Abbey in the Oak Forest, 1810. Oil oncanvas, 3 7 1/2" X 5 7 1/4". Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Staatliche Museen,Berlin. 35
  36. 36. Figure 28-53 JOHN CONSTABLE, The Haywain, 1821. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3” x 6’ 2”.National Gallery, London. 36
  37. 37. Figure 28-54 JOSEPH MALLORD WILLIAM TURNER, The Slave Ship (SlaversThrowing Overboard the Dead and Dying, Typhoon Coming On), 1840. Oil on canvas, 2’11 11/16” x 4’ 5/16”. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. 37
  38. 38. Figure 28-55 THOMAS COLE, The Oxbow (View from Mount Holyoke,Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm), 1836. Oil on canvas, 4’ 3 1/2” x 6’ 4”. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 38
  39. 39. Figure 28-55 THOMAS COLE, TheOxbow (View from Mount Holyoke,Northampton, Massachusetts, after aThunderstorm), 1836. 39
  40. 40. Figure 28-56 ALBERT BIERSTADT, Among the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California,1868. Oil on canvas, 6’ x 10’. National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution,Washington. 40
  41. 41. Figure 28-57 FREDERIC EDWIN CHURCH, Twilight In the Wilderness, 1860s. Oil oncanvas, 3’ 4” x 5’ 4”. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio (Mr. and Mrs. William H.Marlatt Fund, 1965.233). 41
  42. 42. Romantic Revivalist Styles in Architecture 1) variety of revivalist styles in architecture 2) the origins of the designs 3) their impact 42
  43. 43. Figure 28-58 CHARLES BARRY and A. W. N. PUGIN, Houses of Parliament, London,England, designed 1835. 43
  44. 44. Figure 28-59 JOHN NASH, Royal Pavilion, Brighton, England, 1815–1818. 44
  45. 45. Figure 28-60 J. L. CHARLES GARNIER, the Opéra, Paris, France, 1861–1874. 45
  46. 46. Figure 28-61 HENRI LABROUSTE, reading room of the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, Paris, France, 1843–1850. 46
  47. 47. Figure 28-62 JOSEPH PAXTON, Crystal Palace, London, England, 1850–1851. Photofrom Victoria and Albert Museum, London. 47
  48. 48. Photography• the origins of photog and its impact in visual art• Initial use of new medium known as photog• The artist and the works of early photog 48
  49. 49. Figure 28-63 EUGÈNE DURIEUand EUGÈNE DELACROIX,Draped Model (back view), ca. 1854.Albumen print, 7 5/ 16” x 5 1/8”. J.Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles. 49
  50. 50. Figure 28-64 LOUIS-JACQUES-MANDÉ DAGUERRE, Still Life in Studio, 1837.Daguerreotype. Collection Société Française de Photographie, Paris. 50
  51. 51. Figure 28-65 JOSIAH JOHNSON HAWES and ALBERT SANDS SOUTHWORTH,Early Operation under Ether, Massachusetts General Hospital, ca. 1847. Daguerreotype.Massachusetts General Hospital Archives and Special Collections, Boston. 51
  52. 52. Figure 28-66 NADAR, EugèneDelacroix, ca. 1855. Modernprint from original negative inthe Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris. 52
  53. 53. Figure 28-67 JULIAMARGARET CAMERON,Ophelia, Study no. 2, 1867.Albumen print, 1 11" x 102/3". George EastmanHouse, Rochester, NewYork. Gift of EastmanKodak Company. 53
  54. 54. Figure 28-68 TIMOTHY O’SULLIVAN, A Harvest of Death, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania,July 1863. Negative by Timothy O’Sullivan. Original print by ALEXANDERGARDNER, 6 3/8" x 8 3/4". The New York Public Library, New York. 54
  55. 55. Discussion Questions Identify the formal artistic differences between Neoclassicism and Romanticism. Why did Neoclassicism appeal to political leaders in the 19th century? Describe the debate over 19th century aesthetic theory, as characterized by the Poussinistes vs. the Rubenistes. What was the impact of photography in terms of the public’s image of reality? 55

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