Dietary Guidelines Presentation

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Dietary Guidelines Presentation

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Dietary Guidelines Presentation

  1. 1. A Look at the 2010 Dietary Guidelines: Putting Guidelines into Practice March 4, 2011 Erin Laurie, MS, RD, LD Consultant Dietitian and Adjunct Instructor 785-893-2757 [email_address]
  2. 2. History of USDA’s Food Guidance 1940s 1950s-1960s 1970s 1992 2005 Food for Young Children 1916
  3. 3. 2010 Dietary Guidelines: A New Perspective <ul><li>DG Advisory Committee used Nutrition Evidence Based Library </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nutrition Evidence Library </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Targeted toward an overweight and obese population </li></ul><ul><li>Contains a “Call to Action” including changes to food environment; expanding nutrition education; access to fruits and vegetables, and healthful products </li></ul>
  4. 4. Overarching Themes <ul><li>1. Maintain calorie balance over time to achieve and sustain a healthy weight. </li></ul><ul><li>2. Focus on consuming nutrient-dense foods and beverages </li></ul>
  5. 5. Key Differences from 2005 <ul><li>*Emphasis on maintaining a healthy body weight throughout the lifecycle </li></ul><ul><li>* Proper nutrition for children. </li></ul><ul><li>* Information on specific eating patterns such as the USDA Food Intake Pattern, DASH, vegetarian eating patterns </li></ul><ul><li>* Acknowledges the influence of consumers’ broader food and physical activity environment and its impact on Americans’ food, beverage and physical activity choices. There is recognition that improvements to the environment must be coordinated among all sectors of influence. </li></ul><ul><li>* A shift to directional intake (vs. specific quantities) for various food groups </li></ul>
  6. 6. Key Differences from 2005 <ul><li>*A key recommendation on seafood intake </li></ul><ul><li>* I nclusion of research on eating behaviors (e.g., breakfast, snacking, etc.) and the influence of screen time on body weight </li></ul><ul><li>* foods to reduce due to their sodium, saturated fat, cholesterol, trans fat and added sugars content- SoFAs </li></ul><ul><li>* a focus on nutrients of public health concern (vs. intakes below recommended levels) such as potassium, dietary fiber, calcium and vitamin D </li></ul><ul><li>* a new guidance on alcohol consumption by breastfeeding women </li></ul><ul><li>* an appendix table of key consumer behaviors and potential strategies for professionals to use in implementing the Dietary Guidelines </li></ul>
  7. 7. Key Recommendations with Evidence <ul><li>Balancing Calories to Manage Weight </li></ul><ul><li>Foods and Food Components to Reduce </li></ul><ul><li>Foods and Nutrients to Increase </li></ul><ul><li>Building Healthy Eating Patterns </li></ul>
  8. 8. Balancing Calories to Manage Weight <ul><li>Calories in vs. Calories Out </li></ul>
  9. 9. Balancing Calories to Manage Weight <ul><li>Increase intake of whole grains, vegetables, and fruits </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce intake of sugar-sweetened beverages </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor intake of 100% fruit juice for children </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor calorie intake from alcoholic beverages </li></ul>
  10. 10. Top Calories Consumed <ul><li>Children ages 2-18 </li></ul><ul><li>1. Grain-based desserts </li></ul><ul><li>2. Pizza </li></ul><ul><li>3. Soda/Energy/Sports Drinks </li></ul><ul><li>4. Yeast breads </li></ul><ul><li>5. Chicken/Mixed Dishes </li></ul><ul><li>Adults </li></ul><ul><li>1. Grain-based desserts </li></ul><ul><li>2. Yeast breads </li></ul><ul><li>3. Chicken/Mixed Dishes </li></ul><ul><li>4. Soda/Energy/Sports Drinks </li></ul><ul><li>5. Alcohol </li></ul>
  11. 11. Balancing Calories to Manage Weight <ul><li>Focus on the total number of calories consumed </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor food intake </li></ul><ul><li>Choose smaller portions, especially high calorie foods </li></ul><ul><li>Eat a nutrient-dense breakfast </li></ul>
  12. 12. Physical Activity <ul><li>2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2008 Physical Activity Guidelines Link </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Adults: 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week. </li></ul><ul><li>Children: 60 minutes or more each day </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ages 2-5 no specific recommendations- play actively several times each day </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. Foods and Food Components to Reduce <ul><li>Sodium- What is the estimated average sodium intake? </li></ul><ul><li>Fats- Saturated, Trans Fats, Cholesterol </li></ul><ul><li>Solid Fats </li></ul><ul><li>Added Sugars </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Saturated fat and added sugars no more than 5-15 percent of calories </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Foods and Food Components to Reduce <ul><li>Refined Grains </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Provide some vitamins and minerals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Commonly provide excess calories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Many high in added fats and/or added sugars </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Alcohol </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Women- Up to 1 drink per day </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Men- Up to 2 drinks per day </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Foods and Nutrients to Increase <ul><li>Vegetables and Fruits </li></ul><ul><li>Whole-Grains- ½ grains </li></ul><ul><li>Fat-Free and Low-Fat Milk and Milk Products </li></ul><ul><li>Balance in Protein Foods </li></ul><ul><li>Seafood </li></ul><ul><li>Replace some saturated fats with unsaturated fats </li></ul>
  16. 16. © General Mills Parts of a Grain
  17. 17. Nutrients of Concern <ul><li>Potassium </li></ul><ul><li>Fiber </li></ul><ul><li>Calcium </li></ul><ul><li>Vitamin D </li></ul><ul><li>Iron- women of childbearing years/pregnant </li></ul><ul><li>Folate- women of childbearing years/pregnant </li></ul><ul><li>B12 – Americans over 50 </li></ul>
  18. 18. Building Healthy Eating Patterns <ul><li>Focus on nutrient-dense foods </li></ul><ul><li>Remember that beverages count </li></ul><ul><li>Follow food safety principles </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the role of supplements and fortified foods </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Vitamin D </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Folic Acid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vitamin B12 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Iron supplements for pregnant women </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Helping Americans Make Healthy Choices <ul><li>Everyone has a role in the movement to make America healthy. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Influencers of Food Choices </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Call to Action <ul><li>1. Ensure that all Americans have access to nutritious foods and opportunities for physical activity </li></ul><ul><li>2. Facilitate individual behavior change through environmental strategies. </li></ul><ul><li>3. Set the stage for lifelong healthy eating, physical activity, and weight management behaviors. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Helping Americans Make Healthy Choices <ul><li>Keep the following insights in mind when shaping messages </li></ul><ul><li>• Messages that are short, to-the-point and action-oriented are more likely to be </li></ul><ul><li>believed and absorbed. </li></ul><ul><li>• Messages that indicate the uniqueness of each person or family’s needs connect </li></ul><ul><li>with parents more than generalized statements. </li></ul><ul><li>• Messages that imply the consumer has control over their family’s situation , and it </li></ul><ul><li>is within their power to make a change, are also impactful. </li></ul><ul><li>• Parents want to know the benefit of doing something , particularly if the task </li></ul><ul><li>seems time-consuming or difficult, like counting calories and monitoring portions. </li></ul><ul><li>• American parents are looking for “how to” education on the topic, particularly in </li></ul><ul><li>the case of serving nutrient-rich foods and beverages more often. Messages and </li></ul><ul><li>information should not just provide a goal to strive for, but should be instructional </li></ul>
  22. 22. Helping Americans Make Healthy Choices <ul><li>M essages that encourage planning ahead and making a family effort may </li></ul><ul><li>convince parents how important it is to take the time to set goals together and </li></ul><ul><li>work toward them, whether they be around physical activity, portion size or </li></ul><ul><li>successfully incorporating higher-calorie foods. </li></ul><ul><li>• While the concept of being a role model is helpful, messages should not imply </li></ul><ul><li>that parents are doing anything “wrong” today . This will be a turn-off as parents do feel they are doing the best they can, often in difficult situations. </li></ul><ul><li>Messages should focus more on how they could do something better tomorrow. </li></ul><ul><li>• Messages that draw analogies to constructs that they are very familiar with, </li></ul><ul><li>such as budgeting for calories, are very appealing. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Top Messages
  24. 24. Thoughts for Consideration <ul><li>If DGA are viewed as all-or-nothing goals, little room to embrace or celebrate small changes </li></ul><ul><li>Consumer messages around nutrition and especially weight loss need to be simple and focused on specific population groups. </li></ul><ul><li>The “one size fits all” consumer message leads to confusion and noncompliance. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Resources <ul><li>Dietary Guidelines: www.dietaryguidelines.gov </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consumer Materials available on or before April 27 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>International Food Information Council: www.foodinsight.org </li></ul><ul><li>MyPyramid: www.mypyramid.gov </li></ul><ul><li>DASH Eating Plan: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/new_dash.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition: www.bellinstitute.org </li></ul><ul><li>American Dietetic Association www.eatright.org </li></ul>
  26. 26. Thank you! <ul><li>-Kansas Wheat Proudly Sponsors this Session- </li></ul><ul><li>You are invited to the </li></ul><ul><li>National Festival of Breads </li></ul><ul><li>June 25, 2011 at Wichita Airport Hilton </li></ul><ul><li>Visit www.nationalfestivalofbreads.com </li></ul>
  27. 27. Questions? Erin Laurie, MS, RD, LD Consultant Dietitian and Adjunct Instructor 785-893-2757 [email_address]

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