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Frontiers of Interaction 2011 - Successful Collaboration
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Frontiers of Interaction 2011 - Successful Collaboration

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Keeping clients happy!

Keeping clients happy!


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  • Designers and clients – broad terms. You may still have a client if you work internally, for an agency, or freelance.
  • Discussion and scribing – what do we think it means?
  • You are the end of a project and are sharing your final deliverables with your client (your client might be internal or external; you might be freelance, internal, or with an agency). Actor 1 – play yourself, as a reasonable, effective designerActor 2 – play the “worst” client you can imagineAudience – take notes about what happens – what are the breakdowns, failures
  • You are the end of a project and are sharing your final deliverables with your client (your client might be internal or external; you might be freelance, internal, or with an agency). Actor 1 – play an unreasonable, arrogant designerActor 2 – play the best client you can imagineAudience – take notes about what happens – what are the breakdowns, failures
  • If you are freelance and they are not, then you have a very different life than they do; cherish your freedom but understand their constraints. This is a very American example, but what do you see? Get an example from Julie for Korea. Or an example from Financial – security, etc.? Story about contempt or dimsissiveness from Avaya HQ in NJ.
  • the overall corporation did NOT allow wireless in any of their buildings (a telecommunications company!!!) so the HCI group had to get special dispensation from the bureaucracy to get it in their offices so that they could carry around laptops and collaborate and communicate;also they would have their flash drives confiscated and ipods sealed up upon entry into the building to prevent theft.... which also really prevented collaboration and just getting-work-done; USB ports blocked out on laptops (as was Google Docs) for collaborating and sharing files; so these people are trying to be creative and to collaborate with you but this is what they have to deal with. Understand it, and how that affects how they are dealing with day to day stuff
  • What are the tools that not only reassure but provide information in the way they need it, the way they want it, the way they know how to use it. This is about a familiar tool for something they know - timelines
  • This is something they aren’t familiar with – an innovation process – so put it in their terms
  • Let’s revisit what we wrote at the beginning!
  • Transcript

    • 1. Successful Collaboration
      Keep your clients happy
      FOI11 Steve PortigalJune 20, 2011 @steveportigal
    • 2. Introduction 5 minutes
      Exercise: Role-playing 25 minutes
      Philosophy and Tactics for Collaboration30 minutes
      Exercise: Role-playing 25 minutes
      Wrap Up 5 minutes
      Agenda
    • 3. Today: Designers, working with clients
      In our fields we have a lot of assumptions about the natural relationship between designers and clients. Let’s look at how to create harmony instead of conflict.
      Who are we? Do you identify with designer? Or with client? Or something else?
    • 4. Portigal
      We help companies discover and act on new insights about their customers and themselves
    • 5. Take a fresh look at people
      Use existing ideas as hypotheses
      What to make or do
      Refine & prototype
      Launch
      Iterate & improve
      We work throughout the development cycle
      Explore new ideas
    • 6. American Lens on Global Experiences
      Kyoto
      Amsterdam
      London
      Indonesia
      Istanbul
      California
      Paris
      Taipei
      Bangalore
    • 7. American Lens on Global Experiences
      Canadian
      Kyoto
      Amsterdam
      London
      Indonesia
      Istanbul
      Toronto
      Paris
      Taipei
      Bangalore
    • 8. Definition?
    • 9. Exercise: Role Playing
      You are the end of a project and are sharing your final deliverables with your client (your client might be internal or external; you might be freelance, internal, or with an agency).
      Actor 1 – play yourself, as a reasonable, effective designer
      Actor 2 – play the “worst” client you can imagine
      Audience – take notes about what happens – what are the breakdowns, failures
    • 10. Exercise: Role Playing
      Scene 1
      • Actor 1 plays themselves as a reasonable designer about to deliver at the end of a project
      • 11. Actor 2 plays a bad client
      • 12. Audience: take notes about what you see happening
      • 13. Action!
    • Exercise: Role Playing
      Scene 2
      • Actor 1 plays an arrogant unreasonable designer about to deliver at the end of a project
      • 14. Actor 2 plays a great client
      • 15. Audience: take notes about what you see happening
      • 16. Action!
      Repeat as time permits
    • 17. Debrief: What did we see?
      • Where and why did the dialogue break down?
      • 18. Where and why did the dialogue succeed?
      • 19. What best practices did we see?
    • Philosophy and Tactics for Collaboration
      Transitional slide – a big picture of something
    • 20. Different professions have different cultures
    • 21. Did he just say culture?
    • 22. What is culture?
    • 23. Culture defined
      How a group of people make sense of the world, through common
    • What do these cultures emphasize?
    • 32. Acknowledging our differences
    • 33. Empathy/sympathy for other circumstances
    • 34. Empathy/sympathy for other circumstances
    • 35. Shared experiences
      This isn’t just about going to a restaurant – this is a new challenging experience for all of us.
      We were there to do fieldwork, to do ethnography, to go into Japanese homes.
      But this happens whenever we do fieldwork; we’re driving around, getting lost, sharing out of office time, informally, solving problems together, being uncomfortable, dining out.
      This produces great relationships, you get a lot of insight into what kind of people they are.
    • 36. For more on comfort and discomfort
    • 37. Workshops
      Shared activities can also be diving into the work together; we have clients join us in the field, read over field notes, come to our office and work through data together, we also do these workshops where people generate ideas. Often, our role is to facilitate them to get the information they need, in many ways we’re stepping back and letting go, we’re not solution givers, we are taking them to the point where they discover solutions.
      This can challenge our own feelings of where our expertise is, but again, we are letting go. And interesting things can happen; if you can feel confident about yourself as someone that is enabling OTHERs rather than being yourself the master, then you are in a different position to make things happen.
    • 38. Go beyond meeting them halfway
      Understand
      Create
    • 39. Go beyond meeting them halfway
      Understand
      Create
      Create
      Create
      Create
    • 40. Go beyond meeting them halfway
      Understand
      Create
      Create
      Understand
      Understand
      Create
      Create
      Understand
    • 41. What you can do - Consulting 101
      Be on time, especially if they are on time
      Use their communication tools (Email? Telephone?)
      Emulate their work artifacts
      In other words, speak their language
    • 42. What else can you do?
    • 43. What else can you do?
    • 44. Treat this like a design problem
    • 45. Exercise: More Role Playing
    • 46. Exercise: More Role Playing
      Scene 3
      • Actor 1 plays a designer at the end of a project
      • 47. Actor 2 plays a client
      • 48. Play the scene, given what we now know
      • 49. Audience: take notes about what you see happening
      • 50. Action!
      Repeat as time permits
    • 51. Debrief: What did we see?
    • 52. Definition, once again!
    • 53. I’ve got a tip (that you didn’t cover) that works well for me…
      Yeah, I’ve got a question for ya…
      One new thing I learned today is…
      @steveportigal
      steve@portigal.com
      +1-415-894-2001
      Portigal Consulting
      www.portigal.com
    • 54. Coming in 2012!
      A book by Steve Portigal
      The Art and Craft of User Research Interviewing
      http://rosenfeldmedia.com/books/user-interviews/
    • 55. Grazie mille!
      @steveportigal
      steve@portigal.com
      +1-415-894-2001
      Portigal Consulting
      www.portigal.com

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