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Design Thinking Seminars

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A seminar series / design thinking primer I created for colleagues that is based on IDEO U's fantastic programs.

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Design Thinking Seminars

  1. 1. D E S I G N T H I N K I N G P R I M E R S E M I N A R S E R I E S I n s p i r e d
  2. 2. A process for creative problem solving Learn how to see the world differently to uncover deep insights that help solve problems in new ways Use Idea Cultivation, Rapid Prototyping and Strategic Iteration to unlock new visions of the future Persuade and inspire others by learning how to create and tell compelling stories What is Design Thinking Insights for Innovation From Ideas to Action Storytelling for Influence Leading for Creativity Learn how to empower everyone to search for innovative solutions and execute bold ideas Part 05 Part 04 Part 03 Part 02 Part 01 Topics
  3. 3. PART 01 Use empathy and experimentation to arrive at innovative solutions Do: Make decisions based on evidence and what customers really want Don’t: Rely only on historical data or instinct What is Design Thinking?
  4. 4. CEO IDEO What is Design Thinking? Tim Brown “Design thinking can be described as a discipline that uses the designer’s sensibility and methods to match people’s needs with what is technologically feasible and what a viable business strategy can convert into customer value and market opportunity.” 4
  5. 5. Design Thinking Lenses 1. Desirability - Discover the wants and desires of others to propose a solution that addresses what people need 2. Feasibility - Can the solutions that surface be created 3. Viability - Must be sustainable in different environments and make solid business sense Desirability - HUMAN - Feasibility - TECHNICAL - Viability - BUSINESS - Successful Innovation
  6. 6. Design Thinking Astigmatism All about the people Desirability - HUMAN - What happens when one or more of the lens are out of “focus”? Viability - BUSINESS - All about the money Feasibility - TECHNICAL - All about the bling Is it truly needed? Can it reasonably be built? Is it uniquely valuable?
  7. 7. Design Thinking Process 7
  8. 8. Proposed Design Thinking Process 8 Why What If How
  9. 9. CEO Apple Design vs Design Thinking Steve Jobs “Most people make the mistake of thinking design is what it looks like. People think it’s this veneer — that the designers are handed this box and told,‘Make it look good!’That’s not what we think design is. It’s not just what it looks like and feels like. Design is how it works.” 9
  10. 10. PART 02 Learn how to see the world differently to uncover deep insights that help solve problems in new ways Insights for Innovation Observations Listen with our eyes to understand what people value and care about Extremes Extreme perspectives stretch our thinking to see beyond our assumptions and get to bold, new ideas Interviews Conduct a great interview to get deeper, more honest answers that inspire great insights. Empathy Create immersive experiences to go beyond intellectual understanding to obtain a more visceral sense of another’s perspective. Insights Learn how to share compelling, quality insights that will inspire and motivate others to innovate.
  11. 11. Observations Observing is listening with your eyes. Discover what people care about through their spaces, with their objects and how they interact with other people. 11 Be Curious
  12. 12. What to look For … 12 BEHAVIORAL PROMPTS ADAPTATIONS WHAT PEOPLE VALUE BODY LANGUAGE PATTERNS UNEXPECTED 6 Tips
  13. 13. What activities are people engaged in? Why might these activities be important? Activities A E I O U Take note of spaces and locations.What’s unique about them? How do they support or frustrate people? Environments Who’s interacting with users in this context? What’s the purpose of these interactions? What’s the tone? Interactions Are there any objects being used? If so, how, and why are they important? Objects Interview users to better understand their needs. Users 13 Where to look for it …
  14. 14. Observing in Practice 14 1 WHO TO VIEW? What types of people do you want to observe in order to learn and get inspired? 2 WHERE TO GO ONLINE? Where can you observe your target audience online? Are they on social media? 3 WHERE TO GO OFFLINE? What types of people do you want to observe in order to learn and get inspired? 4 WHAT THINGS TO WATCH FOR? What are you curious to learn? What themes will you be looking for? PLANSHARE WHO DID YOU OBSERVE? WHERE DID YOU OBSERVE? WHAT OBSERVATIONS SPARKED YOUR CURIOSITY? WHAT MIGHT BE MOTIVATING THE BEHAVIOR YOU OBSERVED?
  15. 15. Extremes The importance to look at extremes, and how to go about identifying extreme people to observe and interview. Learning from extreme perspectives can stretch your thinking to see beyond your assumptions and get to bold, new ideas. 15 Stretch Your Mind Extreme Ironing is actually a thing.Who knew?
  16. 16. Demographics (age, gender, ethnicity) Behaviors (experts vs novices) Motivations (what drives action) Step 1 C R E AT E L E N S TO F O C U S E X T R E M E S Through the lens, imagine and identify the outliers who can shed light on novel insights Step 2 S T R E TC H V I E W A N D S P E C I F Y TA R G E T S 16 2 Steps to Identifying Extremes Extremes Extremes S T R E TC H = L E V E L O F C O O K I N G E X P E R I E N C E S P E C I F Y = W H O A R E T H E S E P E O P L E ? Has never done it Does it professionally Does it regularly A cooking class for child A chef at a top restaurant
  17. 17. Strive for Balance Stay mindful to achieve a balanced perspective. Considering only experts will yield warp your perspective. 17 If there’s good reason for the imbalance, clearly explain why
  18. 18. Interviews Setting the stage, striving to engage and asking the kinds of right questions are the keys to a great interview. Great interviews get deeper, more honest answers that inspire novel insights. 18 Deepen your inquiry
  19. 19. 19 Anatomy of an Interview A great interview is not merely a series of questions and answers, but an engaging conversation you might have with a friend. Time Engagement Introductions Build Rapport Evoke Stories Mind the Gap Gratitude Emotional Highpoint
  20. 20. Structure interviews to keep the conversation on target, but still allow for spontaneity. The goal is to empathize with interviewees and to see things from their point of view. 20 Tips for Interviewing Non-verbal cues such as eye contact, nodding, and smiling signal that you’re engaged and interested. Body Language Try not to make interviewees feel that you’re more knowledgeable than they are.Avoid making them feel tested or interrogated. Minimize Your Presence Allow room to hear how a person experiences the world. Keep asking “why” until you get to the underlying meaning. Open-Ended Questions Pacing matters. Get to know the person, then explore topics of interest. Conclude by digging deeper into the most interesting areas. Start Board, Finish Deep Ask participants to show you the things they interact with instead of just talking about them. It might prompt an even richer conversation. Show Me Ask participants to tell a story about an event in their past, e.g.“Tell me about a time when you made a significant discovery in your lab.” Tell Me About a Time When What they say might not match up with what they do or be able to verbalize.Tune into the things that don’t match up— said or not said. Mind The Gap Observe and ask questions without judging. Don’t correct or challenge Don’t assume to know what they’re going to say or put words in their mouth. Stay Unbiased Unassuming questions encourage people to explain the logic of their behaviors. Pose questions with genuine curiosity to avoid sounding patronizing. Ask Naive Questions As participants perform an exercise, ask them to think aloud to uncover relevant motivations, concerns, perceptions and reasoning. Think Aloud
  21. 21. Interviewing in Practice 21 1WHO ARE YOUR INTERVIEWEES? EXTREMES? 2WHAT ARE THE IMPORTANT THEMES AND TOPICS? 3WHAT OBSERVATIONS WERE YOU CURIOUS ABOUT? 4WHAT ARE YOUR KEY QUESTIONS? PLANSHARE PROBLEMS & QUOTES INTERPRETATIONS INSIGHTS OPPORTUNITIES & IDEAS
  22. 22. Empathy Create immersive experiences that get you beyond intellectual understanding to obtain a more visceral sense of another’s perspective. Emotional triggers are motivating and help to bond and align us with the people we are serving. 22 Once more with feeling
  23. 23. Think of ways you can alter your perspective to better relate to someone who sees things differently than you do. See what you discover. Change Perspective 1 Tips for Empathy Immersion 23 Designing immersive empathy experiences can be challenging. Here are a few tips to help get started. Engage in an analogous experience Is there some quality of the experience you are designing (confusion? steep learning curve? fast pace?) that you could experience analogously? 4 LimitYourself Consider who you’re designing for and any aspect of their experience that you might take for granted.What happens when you take that ability away from yourself? 3 Do ItYourself Have you personally experienced the products, services or experiences you’re creating? How can you do something firsthand to understand what it might feel like? 2
  24. 24. Are You Empathetic? 30 Second Empathy Test “Take your right forefinger and draw a capital E on your forehead.” EWritten for you to read? EWritten for others to read?
  25. 25. Insights Take observations, interactions with extremes, interviews, empathy experiences to create compelling insights. Share compelling, quality insights that will inspire and motivate others to innovate. 25 Inspire Innovation
  26. 26. Supported by observations with real people Authentic Beyond an observation or something someone would immediately think of when describing the subject Non-Obvious Offers a (previously hidden) glimpse into how people think or feel. It helps interpret the “Why?” behind human behavior. Revealing 26 Insights are the heart and soul of creating solutions. For something to be an insight, it must be: What is an Insight?
  27. 27. How to Summarize & Share Insights 27 Once you’ve learned through observation, interviewing, empathy and extremes, move through the 4 steps to summarize insights. 1 Capture quotes, observations and interpretations you have from interviews, observations, empathy immersion and learnings from extremes. Step 1. Capturing 2 Notice themes and patterns and cluster your learnings when they have similar topics.Try out a few names you might call that theme. Step 2. Connecting 3 Work to make your insights informative, inspiring and memorable. Try and try again. Share what you are working on with others for feedback.What’s working and what isn’t? Step 3. Crafting 4 Pull your themes together into a story. Use visuals to bring your points to life for others. Step 4. Storytelling
  28. 28. Motivations What did they care about most? What motivates them? Stories What was the most memorable or inspiring story? 28 Interactions What was unique about how they interacted with their environment? Frustrations What frustrates them? What do they struggle with? Unexpected What were the most unexpected events? Between the Lines Tune into emotions, contradictions, workarounds, body language. Don’t project your own ideas. How To Capture • Using Post-it notes, capture each data point (1 per Post-it for easy organizing in Step 2. Connecting) • Construct each data point as a statement, phrase or visual to convey context and meaning. • Don’t worry about interpreting yet! Just record the things you found most interesting or unexpected. What to Capture Step 1. Capturing Data Points Data Points are the people, places, quotes, anecdotes, feelings, interactions, observations that you found MOST interesting
  29. 29. 29 Step 2. Connecting the dots Cluster data points together in meaningful ways to discover themes and patterns Cluster Data Points Which data points are related to each other in some way? Listen & Look for Meaning Discuss clusters. Compare data points to identify connections Write Headlines Craft a concise label for each cluster Create Themes of Your Clusters Look for patterns and tensions in the ways that clusters relate to each other to form Themes. Link Themes Group related themes into larger categories. Highlight Best Stories for a Theme Which quote, story, anecdote, or observation best brings your theme or headline to life? Dig Deeper Keep asking “why” until your headlines become visceral Edit Brutally It’s not about capturing everything. It’s about surfacing the best of the best.
  30. 30. Step 3. The Art of Crafting Insight Statements 30 Great insights don’t just appear. They must be crafted. And besides being Authentic, Non-Obvious and Revealing, great insights are also … Honing insights gets a little messy until the big idea emerges. Let the process meander and flow unto things feel anchored. Embrace the Mess Combine each other’s ideas to spark new thoughts. Build on Ideas Present your insights to see what is and isn’t working. Gather Feedback Put the most interesting things into words in less than 10 minutes. Share and listen to other’s POVs Trade Ideas Rely heavily on what ‘feels’ meaningful and push yourself to take leaps and make connections Intuition is Your Guide Engaging and paying close attention to details is critical to the process Listen Actively Does it shed light on what people need and want? Informative Is it motivating? Does it make you FEEL something in order to DO something? Inspiring Is it phrased in a way that will stick with you and be easy to share with others? Memorable A How-To for crafting insights
  31. 31. Step 4. Storytelling Pull it all together and bring your themes and insights to life to share your point of view to motivate others. Tell Specific Stories Focus on the individuals and talk about what actually happened. Avoid Generalizations Judgments, evaluations, assumptions and prescriptions Use Words & Pictures Use words, charts, images and prototypes in a robust way to express your thinking. Be Descriptive Share vivid details. Use physical senses and emotions to give texture to stories. Edit & Filter Let go of superfluous information or patterns that don’t move the project ahead.
  32. 32. Insights for Innovation
  33. 33. PART 03 Use Idea Cultivation, Rapid Prototyping and Strategic Iteration to unlock new visions of the future From Ideas to Action The Art of Ideating Leverage DivergentThinking to generate an abundance of ideas— even ones that might seem ridiculous at first. Rapid Prototyping Rapidly make ideas tangible and sharable to gain feedback and push them further Iterating Forward Move ideas forward through multiple rounds of ideation and prototyping
  34. 34. The Art of Ideating Be comfortable with generating an abundance of ideas to explore options for solving a problem. Use divergent thinking to come up with lots of ideas (even ones that might seem crazy at first) and choose the best ones to move forward. 34 Be Playful
  35. 35. Solo or Group Participants Let’s Get Creative: 30 Circles 35 Turn ordinary circles into recognizable objects in a very short period of time. Three minutes Time Turn as many of these blank circles as you can into recognizable objects. Prompt A key to ideation is giving yourself time limits, Deadlines motivate and help focus the creative process. Remember
  36. 36. It works best when you apply some rules and deadlines to your creative session. For example, you might limit yourself to one hour during a brainstorm. Working within Constraints Stay in the mindset, continue to exercise your creative muscles, and don’t rush to convergence. It’s not time for decision-making yet. Diverging a Bit Longer The more ideas you come up with, the better chance you have to reach a truly brilliant solution. Quantity over Quality It helps to have diverse perspectives when you’re coming up with lots of ideas. If you’re working alone, find ways to pull people in—anyone can ideate. A Team Sport What is Ideation? 36 Exploring many options to answer a question. Encourage testing the borders of brilliant and ridiculous.
  37. 37. How to Ideate Brainstorming The bread and butter of ideation. 37 Creative spaces don’t judge. Let ideas flow so people can build from one another’s ideas Defer Judgement 1 2 Embrace the most out-of-the-box notions.There’s often a fine line between outrageous and brilliant. Encourage Wild Ideas 3 Use “yes, and” instead of “yes, but”. Encourages positivity and inclusivity and leads to more ideas. Build on Ideas of Others 4 Keep the discussion on target. Divergence is essential, but still need to keep eye on the prize Stay Focused on the Topic 5 Use colored markers and Post-Its. Stick ideas to the wall so others can visualize them. Be Visual 6 Quickly crank out ideas. For any 60-minute session, you should shoot for 100 ideas. Go for Quantity 6 rules to get the most out of Brainstorming
  38. 38. Look at the challenge from someone els’s POV. Role-play scenarios or storyboarding Other People’s Shoe-Storming Send a shout-out over email to get a bunch of people involved who are remote. E-Storming Using games and visual thinking to generate ideas and solve problems Game-Storming 38 Here are a few variations on the theme to make it interesting. Methods of Brainstorming
  39. 39. 39 Our work should be fun (and purposeful, rewarding, …), right? A Bit More About Game-Storming www.gamestorming.com
  40. 40. Converging after Ideation 41 Converging is about focusing and narrowing down options. It is not about settling on what ideas are simplest to execute. 1 Give everyone 3-5 votes and ask them to place stickers on there favorite ideas. Step 1. Vote 2 Look for similarities between ideas and cluster them together to see if themes emerge. Step 2. Cluster 3 Summarize what ideas emerged from the ideation phase and consider which ones to prototype. Step 3. Discuss 4 Continue to elicit input from the larger group, but the lead or core team should decide the way forward. Step 4. Decide STEPS TO CONVERGE
  41. 41. Rapid Prototyping Rapidly build ideas to make them tangible and shareable in order to get feedback and push them further.Work through the kinks to find better solutions faster. 42 Build to Think
  42. 42. 43 Making ideas tangible to gather feedback and improve Why Prototype? Build to Think Visualizing and interacting ideas to get better solutions faster Gather Feedback Learn from the gift of feedback and thank the critics. They help lead to better outcomes. Fail Early to Succeed Sooner Getting tangible and getting early feedback allows mistakes to be quickly and inexpensively remedied
  43. 43. Iterate Forward Tips for Building and Sharing Prototypes 44 Get tangible quickly with rough, low-fidelity prototypes. Reflect Listen actively and welcome constructive criticism. Think about how you might respond with your next prototype. Read between the lines. Pay attention to body language. 3 Share Tell the story behind your idea. Don’t try to sell your idea and don’t defend it. Solicit feedback from customers and stakeholders. 2 Build What questions are you trying to answer with your prototype? Consider your audience and the story you are trying to tell.Think of your prototype as a prop to help tell your story. 1 “A prototype is just your idea of what the future might look like. - David Kelley “Strong opinions, weakly held.” - David Kelley
  44. 44. The Feedback Give and Take 45 How to Show Up 1 The Criticism 2 The Fallout 3 Giver Taker Ground feedback in something solid. Who’s the audience? What’s the prototype trying to achieve? Gather Context Tune in to the needs of whom you are serving. What feedback will best serve the work? What should and shouldn’t you be looking for? Calibrate Feedback All of us are smarter than any of us. Ask early and often from many, Different people bring different perspectives. Different moments provide unique learnings. Create for Feedback Set the stage. If your work is early stage, ask for high-level, structural feedback. If your work is late stage, seek out fine-tuning feedback. Express Your Needs Your feedback is in the service of others. Don’t confuse caring with not giving constructive, candid feedback.You can care and criticize simultaneously. Embrace Radical Candor Ground your feedback in examples. Point out what may and may not have worked well. . Be Specific Ask questions. What was memorable? What resonated? What’s missing? What didn’t work? How would you improve? Give Guidance Separate your ego from the work. Your work isn’t you. Repeat the mantra,“This is in service of the work.” Don’t Take It Personally Giving feedback is awkward. Practice makes … better. Practice Feedback elevates self-awareness. Study your impact and delivery by observing the body language and attitude of the receiver. Create Space for Reflection Conflicting feedback may contain similarities.Trust your intuition to find and address patterns. Look for Patterns Let feedback breathe. Avoid reaction. Sleep on it and return to it. Create Space for Reflection
  45. 45. Iterating Forward Move ideas forward through multiple rounds of ideation and prototyping. Refine ideas to make them bolder and tighter. “Fail early to succeed sooner” 46 Experiment
  46. 46. 47 Rinse and repeat with Ideation and Prototyping move ideas Why Iterate? Trial and Error Ideate and prototype repeatedly before moving forward. Good Feedback Give &Take essential. Experiment Forward Failure is expected and necessary. If you aren’t failing, you aren’t trying hard enough. Save Time Iterating manages risk by repeatedly checking assumptions and answering refined questions.
  47. 47. Refining and Advancing Ideas Reexamine the big idea through the Desirability, Feasibility and Viability Lenses 1. List Questions Before converging to refine big idea, diverge again around best answers to top questions. Learn from assumptions. 3. Ideate to Explore Options Consider Urgency and Dependency to determine which questions to answer first. 2. Prioritize Questions Continue building and sharing to answer top questions and focus lenses.Take more calculated risks to close in on goal 4. Prototype to Build, Share & Learn 48 4 Steps to Iterate
  48. 48. From Ideas to Action
  49. 49. PART 04 Persuade and inspire others by learning how to create and tell compelling stories Storytelling for Influence Developing a Blueprint Set up for success by identifying stakeholders, their needs and the big idea Build Storytelling Prototypes Don’t race to the final story - create distinct versions to engage others in the process Design for Impact Find tune the story so that it resonates with the audience and is “sticky”
  50. 50. The Science of Storytelling Functional MRIs show that certain descriptive and figurative language lights up neurological regions that incite action Moves Us When we hear powerful and emotional stories, our brain often releases dopamine. Dopamine helps us remember the experience with greater accuracy. Help Us Remember Psychologists and neurologists have found that stories stimulate the parts of the brain that helps us intuit others’ thoughts and emotions. Increases Empathy Our brain produces oxytocin after listening to a character- driven story. Oxytocin has been shown to help motivate us toward cooperation Encourage Cooperation 51 Narrative sticks in our brains, moves us (literally) and increases empathy
  51. 51. 52 Three Act Structure The point of the acts is so the story evolves and the stakes get higher. Each act has its own set of guidelines that make the foundation of story development Time Tension (Engagement) Introduction Act I • Introduce main characters and their worldview. • Establish theme (situation) and hook (challenge) • Make a promise Plot Point #1 Inciting Incident RisingAction - Stakes Get Higher Act II • Play out the challenges to the promise to excruciation Plot Point #2 Resolution Denouem ent Act III • Punchline, payoff • Release of tension • Dilemma resolved
  52. 52. The World That Is How To Get There (your product/service) The World That Could Be 53 What is, what could be, and how to get there Three Part Theme Remember: Features Tell, Benefits Sell.
  53. 53. Develop a Blueprint Blueprints focus the narrative, understand the audience and their needs, and target the intended impact and outcome. 54 Empathize with the Audience
  54. 54. Zeroing in on this is important but isn’t always easy.The more specific you can be the better. Who’s Your Audience Think about underlying human needs. Don’t stop at first thought. People and needs are complex. What Do They Care About What do you want to unlock with your story and what you want people to do. Remember, you are motivating people toward change. What Are You Trying to Achieve 55 Create an action plan that clarifies who you're talking to, what they care about, and what you’re trying to achieve Start with The Brief
  55. 55. 56 Get and stick to the point so the audience is clear about the ask. Too much information doesn’t server the cause. Less is more. What’s the one thing you want the audience to remember? The Big Idea Does the Big Idea Capture the Problem? What are you trying to change? Is it Compelling? Is the audience inspired to action? Is it Clear and Concise? Can the audience quickly digest the idea?
  56. 56. Solo Participants “In a Nutshell” Activity 57 Practice being clear and concise by capturing a movie logline. NOTE: The Big Idea is the single point that you are trying to make through your story. A logline is the 1 -2 sentence summary of a piece of work. Five minutes Time Choose a movie and identify the big idea and write the logline Directions How would you break these down into one clear and concise sentence?
  57. 57. The Medium Consider how the medium helps (or hurts) your specific story. 58 + Portable + ……………………. + ……………………. Slide Presentations 1 - Static - ……………………. - ……………………. 2 Experiences + Engaging + ……………………. + ……………………. - Complex - ……………………. - ……………………. 3 Videos +Emotional +……………………. +……………………. - Costly - ……………………. - ……………………. 4 Digital / Interactive + Encourage Learning + ……………………. + ……………………. - Expertise Required - ……………………. - ……………………. 5 Physical Spaces +Invites Participation +……………………. +……………………. - Logistically Challenging - ……………………. - ……………………. Pros & Cons “The medium is the message.” - Marshall Mcluhan
  58. 58. Storytelling Prototypes Get your story out of your head and into the hands of others for feedback and buy-in. Build, Share and Reflect your way forward. Courageously face the blank page and iterate, iterate, iterate … 59 Be Brave The faster you get your ideas in front of others, the faster you can incorporate the feedback and improve
  59. 59. 60 Get creative. Pen and paper, phone, local pub … Ways to Prototype and Build Your Story Hit Record Speak naturally and from the heart. Let the words roll out of your mouth and into the world Post-It Palooza Post your “intro,”“main points,” and “conclusion”. Start at the end if you’re not sure how to begin The Bar Test Social lubrication. Change your environment, don’t over think it, just tell it. Feedback makes it stronger
  60. 60. 61 1. Return to Blueprint Compare the feedback to your brief and big idea—are you getting all the points across that you meant to make? Feedback Questions 1. What was most memorable? 2. What do you have questions about? 3. What moved or motivated you? 4. What, in your opinion, was the big idea? Steps for Reflecting Inviting Feedback that Strengthens the Story Start by asking a series of deliberate questions to really get your audience thinking. Then reflect on what you learned. REMEMBER: We’re not just telling stories for fun. We want our audience to take action so we need to know what’s important to them. What did they find to be moving and inspiring? 2. Get Physical Write each piece of feedback on a post-it and then place it near the part of the story it refers to.What stands out to you? 3. Let it Breathe Take a step back and sit with your feedback. If it stung a little, forget about it for a while.Time often brings clarity. 4. Revise Your Draft Take a step back and sit with your feedback. If it stung a little, forget about it for a while.Time often brings clarity.
  61. 61. Design for Impact Consider all the elements involved in telling a great story that motivates others toward action.Tone is everything. Make it resonate with the audience. 62 Be Inspiring
  62. 62. Setting the Right Tone 63 SPEAK FROM THE HEART SPEAK NATURALLY SPEAK THOUGHTFUL LY SPEAK PASSIONATE LY DO’SDON’TS Sound like a robot Believe that smarter = more formal Speak in dry, business-y language Be boring It’s not what we say, it’s how we say it. The right tone for the right audience can increase the impact of your story
  63. 63. 64 How would you write a letter to each of the following three people explaining why storytelling is important? Dear (Queen of England) Activity Best Friends Young Child Queen of REMEMBER: This activity is about tone, not the power of persuasion. Use the same argument for all three letters, but change the words so that voice and tone are appropriate for each recipient. 1. Move us Functional MRIs show that certain descriptive and figurative language lights up neurological regions that incite action Storytelling Talking Points 2. Increases Empathy Psychologists and neurologists have found that stories stimulate the parts of the brain that helps us intuit others’ thoughts and emotions. 3. Help Us Remember When we hear powerful and emotional stories, our brain often releases dopamine. Dopamine helps us remember the experience with greater accuracy 4. Encourage Cooperation Our brain produces oxytocin after listening to a character- driven story. Oxytocin has been shown to help motivate us toward cooperation.
  64. 64. How to Make an Impact A story is a person with a problem so we must motivate others to solve that problem 65 Personal stories resonate with us and move us as human beings. Everyone has a story to share Make it Personal 1 2 Choose images to paint a picture for your audience. It will help your audience remember, relate to, and respond to your story. Make it Visual 3 A lot of people will tell you otherwise. But don’t listen to that. Sometimes you just have to be vulnerable. Get Emotional 4 Anecdotes are the “put you in the room” moments. Re ection is the part of the story where you help the audience make sense of what they just heard Use Anecdote & Reflection 5 What do you want people to do after hearing your story? Highlight “next steps,”“what to remember,” or “the one thing you want them to do.” Include Call to Action 6 Get fuel to your creative engine. Listen to music.Take a walk outside. Exercise. Leave the office! Just take notice of the world around you.There are stories everywhere! Stay 6 tips to see it, feel it and believe it
  65. 65. PART 05 Learn how to empower everyone to search for innovative solutions and execute bold ideas Leading for Creativity Leading with a Strong Point ofView Setting a course for an inspiring new direction Leading Through Culture Setting new norms that support creative work Leading Alongside Staying present and engaged with the work of your team
  66. 66. Finding Answers Through Questions A retrospective thought experiment 67 Think about the last meeting you attended.What were all the questions that were asked? Step 1 Step 2 What did these questions illuminate? • Did they invite others to participate? • Did they close down opportunities? • Can you identify any patterns?
  67. 67. Leading with a Strong Point of View Setting a course for an inspiring, new direction. Need to hold an inspiring vision for people to follow. Stick to it and take creative risks to get closer to the most valuable solution. 68 Play the role of Explorer
  68. 68. When and How to Lead with a Strong Point of View Tip 1. Don’t include the solution in the question Tip 3. Include who you are designing for Tip 2. Make your questions generative and inspiring Tip 4. Get specific about what part of the journey you are designing for 69 When you need to set the course at the beginning of the journey or When there are bold risks to be taken and you need to take responsibility for the outcome
  69. 69. Activity: Leading with a Strong Point of View 70 Let’s practice leading with a strong point of view by defining our Purpose and Vision and identifying the Challenges we may face What do we believe? Why, beyond making a profit, do we exist? Purpose How through our work are we embodying our purpose? Vision What problems do we need to solve to realize our vision? Challenges Our purpose is … Our vision is … Step 1: Defining our Purpose and Vision
  70. 70. Activity: Leading with a Strong Point of View 71 Problem 1: Step 2: What are 3 problems preventing us from achieving our vision Problem 2: Problem 3: Let’s practice leading with a strong point of view by defining our Purpose and Vision and identifying the Challenges we may face
  71. 71. Activity: Leading with a Strong Point of View 72 Step 3: Choose one problem from Step 2 and write five challenge questions we can get started on today Let’s practice leading with a strong point of view by defining our Purpose and Vision and identifying the Challenges we may face How might we: How might we: How might we: How might we: How might we: REMEMBER: You want your question to be in the sweet spot—broad enough to be inspiring, but not too abstract; narrow enough to be actionable, but not too directive.
  72. 72. Leading through Culture Setting new norms that support creative work. Create conditions for creativity to flourish and provide inspiration when energy is low.Act swiftly to address challenges when they crop up. 73 Play the role of Gardener
  73. 73. 74 BELIEFS Consider the Beliefs and Behaviors that are consistently present with creative teams When and How to Lead through Culture Before starting a project while planning how the work will get done or When there is friction or tension Every team member should be able to say: • I feel inspired • I have ownership • I am growing • My team has my back • I don’t have to get it right every time BEHAVIORS When you observe a functioning creative team: • The collaborate (all of us are smarter than any of us) • They get tangible (early and often) • They learn from failure (and stay inspired) • They stay curious (questions, questions, questions …)
  74. 74. Rituals Ways to nudge the culture of the team toward beliefs and behaviors that support creative work 75 Identify gaps or tensions in our culture1 2 Flip the gap or tension into a question 3 Brainstorm ways to answer the question 4 Try it out 5 Reflect on it 5 Steps
  75. 75. Activity: Designing a Ritual to Increase our Creative Confidence 76 STEP 1. Identify gaps or tensions in our culture. Where do you observe a tension? What’s missing from our culture? • I feel inspired • I have ownership • I am growing • My team has my back • I don’t have to get it right every time Beliefs • They collaborate • They get tangible • They learn from failure • They stay curious Behaviors Option A: Tensions I see a tension between and Option B: Gaps My team (or organization) is missing
  76. 76. 77 How might we: How might we: How might we: How might we: How might we: REMEMBER: You want your question to be in the sweet spot—broad enough to be inspiring, but not too abstract; narrow enough to be actionable, but not too directive. STEP 2. Flip the gap or tension into a “How might we…” question. Choose one to move forward. Activity: Designing a Ritual to Increase our Creative Confidence
  77. 77. 78 Ritual 1: Ritual 2: Ritual 3: Ritual 4: Ritual 5: STEP 3. Brainstorm ways to address one of our “How might we…” questions. Activity: Designing a Ritual to Increase our Creative Confidence Remove all distractions (non-essential tech and toys) from meeting rooms Require all meetings have agenda and clear goals, action items, minutes, … Consider how they specifically address tension or gap and positively affect beliefs and behaviors Make all meetings stand-ups Examples:
  78. 78. Leading Alongside Staying present and engaged with the work of the team. Be authentic and relatable. Stay at “eye level” and let the team make the necessary adjustments to move forward. 79 Play the role of Coach
  79. 79. 80 When to Lead Alongside When you have more experience or a better vantage point and when being directive would hinder creativity When to engage with your team … 1. At the beginning, when choosing and setting up the HMW challenge 2. At regular intervals (inflection points) along the way 3. At the end, or during moments of decisions, uncertainty, conflict, …
  80. 80. 81 How to Lead Alongside Leading alongside is a hard skill to master. Choosing the most effective method and the appropriate time takes practice, practice, practice … 1. Choose the right question You might use this (1) at an early stage of a project, (2) when setting conditions, or (3) when a team is overwhelmed and can’t find focus. You might say or do • “In this moment, what’s most critical?” • “Which of our top hunches are the most risky/challenging?” • “If we were to go to market with this tomorrow, where would we be at the highest risk of failure?” Methods for leading alongside 2. Force the pace You might use this (1) at the early stages of a project, (2) to help your team get scrappy when approaching a tricky problem or, (3) to unlock learnings faster. You might say or do • “Imagine we were to hand this project o to a new team tomorrow. What’s the essential information they would need?” • “What can we learn in only a week’s time? ” • Imagine extreme scenarios.“What would we do if...we only pursued pro t? We only sought to make customers happy? We only did what was easiest?” 3. Change the mode You might use this (1) at regular intervals along the way, (2) when team energy is low, or (3) when your team is talking more than doing. You might say or do • Have each team member spend 20 minutes sketching out alternative solutions • Ask team members to switch roles for a moment and approach the same task from a different perspective • Encourage each person to spend 30 minutes gathering inspiration from the way others might approach a similar problem. Cross-share as a group. 4a. Shift focus - Diverge You might use this when (1) your team keeps coming up with the same solutions to a problem, (2) they need to turn insights into actionable ideas, or (3) the team is reaching conclusions too quickly. You might say or do • “If cost were no issue, where would you take this?” • “What customer insights can we draw upon to inspire our thinking?” • As a team, make a list of solutions competitors are too scared to pursue. 4b. Shift focus - Converge You might use this (1) at decision points, (2) when a team is overwhelmed by possibilities, or (3) when they need to refine and make sense of possible directions. You might say or do • “Which of these options would delight our consumers most?” • “For each of our top ideas, let’s discuss feasibility, viability, and desirability” • Envision the future with the team.“Which course of action would earn us the most recognition in five years?” 5. Share Learning You might use this (1) at the end of a process, (2) at decision points, or (3) when the team can’t agree on where to go next. You might say or do • “Invite your team to share reflections starting with “I like,” “I wish,” and “I wonder.” • “What were our goals? How did we try to reach them? What new things did we try? • “What didn’t we anticipate? What surprised us most?”
  81. 81. Activity: To Converge or not to Converge (Diverge) 82 Let’s practice leading alongside. In this simulation, you’re going to role-play guiding the process of experimentation at regular intervals along the way. Imagine you’re the leader of a five-person team designing a new product.As the leader, you hold regular check-ins, but are not involved with the day-to-day work. Now we’re going to give you three scenarios. For each, decide if you will guide the team to: 1. Diverge or, 2. Converge, and tell us why you made that decision. Then harness your inner coach and write what you might say to them as you guide them in that direction. What To Do In divergent moments, teams go wide to expand the possibilities and generate new ideas. In convergent moments, teams make sense of what they learned and refine their ideas. What To Remember
  82. 82. Activity: To Converge or not to Converge (Diverge) 83 At an early check-in for the project, you hear team members frequently saying, “We can’t do that, because...” It seems they know their business and industry constraints so well that they can’t imagine it any other way. New ideas get killed before they have a chance to be considered. SCENARIO 1: STUCK BY CONSTRAINTS Converge or Diverge? QUESTIONS Q1. Will you guide the team to Why? Q2. What is one thing you could say or do to guide them in this direction 

  83. 83. Activity: To Converge or not to Converge (Diverge) 84 At an early check-in for the project, you hear team members frequently saying, “We can’t do that, because...” It seems they know their business and industry constraints so well that they can’t imagine it any other way. New ideas get killed before they have a chance to be considered. SCENARIO 1: STUCK BY CONSTRAINTS ANSWERS A1. Diverge. You need to set the conditions that enable your team to think beyond known constraints. They need inspiration and permission to consider alternative solutions. Your team needs to explore and go very wide. It’s all about idea generation A2. Good things to say or ask in this instance include: • If cost were no issue, where would you take this? • What customer insights can we draw upon to inspire our thinking? • What are competitors doing that we’re not? • What other industries have a similar challenge? How do they deal with it, and what can we learn from them? • Constraints aside, what do we wish we could do? What would make us most proud?
  84. 84. Activity: To Converge or not to Converge (Diverge) 85 At your next check-in, your team seems to have unlocked a creative burst of inspiration. The energy is great—like a kid in a candy store—and there are so many creative possibilities. But now the team is having a hard time getting from what the solution could be to what it should be. SCENARIO 2: OVERWHELMED WITH POSSIBILITIES Converge or Diverge? QUESTIONS Q1. Will you guide the team to Why? Q2. What is one thing you could say or do to guide them in this direction 

  85. 85. Activity: To Converge or not to Converge (Diverge) 86 At an early check-in for the project, you hear team members frequently saying, “We can’t do that, because...” It seems they know their business and industry constraints so well that they can’t imagine it any other way. New ideas get killed before they have a chance to be considered. SCENARIO 2: OVERWHELMED WITH POSSIBILITIES ANSWERS A1. Converge. This team needs to get tangible. Invite them to sketch and prototype ideas and then put them in front of users for feedback. This will help them learn which ideas have true potential. It will also make it clear which ideas they can let go of. A2. Good things to say or ask in this instance include: • Sketch five to ten solutions you are most excited about on paper • For each of our top ideas, let’s discuss feasibility (what will be needed to produce this?), viability (how might this impact our business?), and desirability (how much do consumers want this?) • Which of these feel most disruptive and new-to-the-world? Which already exist in some way? • If this project were to be handed onto a new team tomorrow, what two to three things would you want them to focus on? • Which of these would delight our consumers most?
  86. 86. Activity: To Converge or not to Converge (Diverge) 87 Later in the project, the team shares some early prototypes. You notice one set of features is highly detailed and has clearly dominated their focus. That means other key considerations are missing. Though one feature set is strong, the team is missing the bigger picture of how this product will function and get used in the real world. SCENARIO 3: DEEP FOCUS Converge or Diverge? QUESTIONS Q1. Will you guide the team to Why? Q2. What is one thing you could say or do to guide them in this direction 

  87. 87. Activity: To Converge or not to Converge (Diverge) 88 ANSWERS A1. Diverge. The team needs to be guided to think more holistically. While the instinct may be to converge and focus even more, encouraging them to diverge slightly and consider other audiences and moments of use is needed most. They need to broaden their view to see where to take the idea next. A2. Good things to say or ask in this instance include: • Does this capture all of what you intended? Why or why not? • How is this meeting the needs of all our customers (not just the ones who favor this feature)? • Let’s zoom out to consider other stakeholders. What would they say about this? • Let’s imagine 10 situations where this will be used. How well would this work (or not) for each? Later in the project, the team shares some early prototypes. You notice one set of features is highly detailed and has clearly dominated their focus. That means other key considerations are missing. Though one feature set is strong, the team is missing the bigger picture of how this product will function and get used in the real world. SCENARIO 3: DEEP FOCUS
  88. 88. Assessment: Leadership Through the Our Own Eyes (and the eyes of others) 89 … what’s working and what’s not working? … in what ways do you feel empowered? … what can we do to be more present and engaged? It can be tough to know what impact our leadership style has on others. It’s best to go to the source. What is the affect of our leadership on our peers, our environment, our work, …? As creative leaders or those seeking better creative leadership …
  89. 89. From Ideas to Action
  90. 90. Thanks

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