Meeting Manners and Parliamentary Procedure

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Parliamentary Procedure - using it to effectively manage meetings.

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  • Meeting Manners and Parliamentary Procedure

    1. 1. Parliamentary Procedures Effective Meeting Skills
    2. 2. <ul><li>Unmanaged meeting problems will result in wasted time, frustration, and a general dread of attending meetings in which these problems occur unchecked. </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Productive meetings are the responsibility of everyone, not just the formal leader. </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Parliamentary Procedure (rules) provides formal, well-defined structure for groups. </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>Parliamentary Procedure (rules) provides formal, well-defined structure for groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert’s Rules of Order used by estimated 80% of organizations, government bodies and associations. </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Parliamentary Procedure (rules) provides formal, well-defined structure for groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert’s Rules of Order used by estimated 80% of organizations, government bodies and associations. </li></ul><ul><li>Sturgis Standard Code of </li></ul><ul><li>Parliamentary Procedure , used by </li></ul><ul><li>about 15% of groups (particularly </li></ul><ul><li>physicians and dentists). </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><li>Parliamentary Procedure (rules) provides formal, well-defined structure for groups. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert’s Rules of Order used by estimated 80% of organizations, government bodies and associations. </li></ul><ul><li>Sturgis Standard Code of Parliamentary Procedure , used by about 15% of groups </li></ul><ul><li>Unions and legislatures sometimes </li></ul><ul><li> use others. </li></ul>
    8. 10. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules help advance the decision-making process. </li></ul>
    9. 11. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules help advance the decision-making process. </li></ul><ul><li>Robert's 'Rules of Order' are the rules of a fight; they are intended to prevent unfair advantage and to give the minority a fighting chance. </li></ul>
    10. 12. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process. </li></ul><ul><li>Use them whenever a meeting mangler </li></ul><ul><li>threatens to derail a meeting. </li></ul>
    11. 13. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process. </li></ul><ul><li>Use them whenever a meeting mangler </li></ul><ul><li>threatens to derail a meeting. </li></ul>
    12. 14. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process . </li></ul><ul><li>Use them whenever a meeting mangler </li></ul><ul><li>threatens to derail a meeting. </li></ul>
    13. 15. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process. </li></ul><ul><li>Use them whenever a meeting mangler </li></ul><ul><li>threatens to derail a meeting. </li></ul>
    14. 16. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process. </li></ul>
    15. 17. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process. </li></ul>
    16. 18. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agenda Setting </li></ul></ul>
    17. 19. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agenda Setting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Order of Business </li></ul></ul>
    18. 20. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agenda Setting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Order of Business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Protecting minority views </li></ul></ul>
    19. 21. <ul><li>Robert’s Rules helps advance the decision-making process. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Agenda Setting </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Order of Business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Protecting minority views </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nearly every meeting possibility. </li></ul></ul>
    20. 24. <ul><li>Committee reports are often for information only. </li></ul><ul><li>In such instances, no motion is necessary following the report. </li></ul>
    21. 25. <ul><li>Motion not always needed. </li></ul><ul><li>A motion “to adopt” or “to accept” a report is appropriate when the report is to be published in the name of the organization. </li></ul>
    22. 26. <ul><li>On the other hand, the reporting member should end by making a motion if the committee has a specific recommendation for action. </li></ul>
    23. 27. <ul><li>The Treasurer’s Report </li></ul><ul><li>In contrast to common practice, treasurers’ reports seldom require action . </li></ul>
    24. 30. <ul><li>The motion to close debate is just another motion. </li></ul><ul><li>A person wanting to close debate must be recognized by the chair. “The Previous Question” requires a second. </li></ul><ul><li>While the motion to close debate is not debatable, a two-thirds vote is required. </li></ul><ul><li>Only the assembly decides when to end debate. </li></ul>
    25. 33. <ul><li>Many matters can be resolved through “general consent” or “unanimous consent.” </li></ul><ul><li>Under this method, the presiding officer asks , </li></ul><ul><li>“ Is there any objection to . . . ?” For example, “Is there any objection to ending debate?” </li></ul><ul><li>If no one objects, debate is closed . * If a member objects, the matter should be resolved with a motion and vote. </li></ul>
    26. 36. <ul><li>The chair is the servant of the assembly, not its master. Put another way, the chair can only get away with what the assembly allows.  </li></ul><ul><li>During a meeting any member can raise a “Point of Order” if it is believed that the rules of the assembly are being violated. This motion can interrupt a speaker and does not require a second. </li></ul><ul><li>The Chair must now rule on the Point of Order. If the Chair doesn’t know how to rule, the question can be submitted to the assembly for a vote. </li></ul>
    27. 37. <ul><li>The chair can only get away with what the assembly allows.  </li></ul><ul><li>If a member is not happy with the Chair’s ruling, any two members can Appeal from the decision of the chair . </li></ul><ul><li>By one member making and another members seconding the Appeal, any question of parliamentary law can be taken from the chair and given to the assembly for decision. </li></ul><ul><li>The assembly is the ultimate decider of procedural questions during a meeting. </li></ul>
    28. 38. <ul><ul><li>Informal Meetings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Members are not required to obtain the floor and can make motions or speak while seated. </li></ul><ul><li>Motions need not be seconded. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no limit to the number of times a member can speak to a question </li></ul><ul><li>Motions to close or limit debate are generally not used. </li></ul><ul><li>The chair usually can make motions and vote on all questions. </li></ul>
    29. 39. <ul><li>Members must be recognized by the presiding officer before speaking. </li></ul><ul><li>Members are to identify themselves before speaking, particularly in large assemblies where a microphone is required. </li></ul><ul><li>A motion to take action must precede any discussion of an issue. </li></ul><ul><li>Motions must be proposed, considered, and disposed of in a priority of order known as precedence. </li></ul><ul><li>Motions must be seconded. </li></ul><ul><li>Members may not speak a second time on a motion until all who wish to speak a first time have spoken </li></ul><ul><li>Members may only speak to a specific motion twice in one day. </li></ul><ul><li>The presiding officer does not participate in debate. </li></ul>
    30. 40. <ul><li>Summary of Steps in Handling a Motion </li></ul><ul><li>1. A member rises and addresses the presiding officer. </li></ul><ul><li>2. The presiding officer recognizes the member. </li></ul><ul><li>3. The member states the motion. </li></ul><ul><li>4. Another member seconds the motion. </li></ul><ul><li>5. The presiding officer restates the motion, thus placing it before the assembly for consideration. </li></ul><ul><li>6. The assembly may discuss the motion if it is debatable and amend the motion if it is amendable. </li></ul><ul><li>7. The presiding officer takes the vote. </li></ul><ul><li>8. The presiding officer announces the result. </li></ul>
    31. 41. <ul><ul><li>Appoint a “parliamentarian”, if you don’t yet have one. He or she is responsible for “checking the rulebook” if necessary, having a copy of the bylaws and Robert’s Rules always at the ready. An alternate member is a good choice for this position. </li></ul></ul>

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