KNOWLEDGE FOR ALL.HOW OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCESCHALLENGE THE VALUE-ADDED MODEL      OF HIGHER EDUCATION               Dir...
MIT OpenCourseware                     2
OER• “Digital learning resources offered online  (although sometimes in print) freely and  openly to teachers, educators, ...
OER• “OER are teaching, learning, and research  materials in any medium that reside in the  public domain or have been rel...
OER• Educational resources that are freely  available for use by educators and learners  are growing and increasingly used...
The OER community & movement• MIT OpenCourseWare project (2001)• UNESCO (2002)• William and Flora Hewlett Foundation• Open...
Recent developments• From content-only resources to full  learning objects• Including also forms of assessment• And certif...
Benefits & risks• The potential benefits for public education  are huge:  – Improving access of underprivileged learners t...
Benefits & risks• But are also some risks, which probably ask  for national and international policies:  – Quality (assura...
Benefits & risks• For a long time, appropriate intellectual property  licensing was an area with a lot of confusion, but  ...
Benefits                 ChallengesOpen and flexible learning    Language and culturalopportunities                       ...
OER activity               12
Education level with OER activity                                    13
Relevance of benefits                        14
Relevance of challenges                          15
OER policy strategies                        16
Strategic issues for HE• Integrating OERs in the institutional  processes of teaching and learning can  probably help to i...
Strategic issues for HE• Private cost of HE is rapidly increasing,  but what are students exactly paying for?  If content ...
Strategic issues for HE• Is it thinkable that individual portfolios of  skills assessments and digital badges can  become ...
Thank you !dirk.vandamme@oecd.org www.oecd.org/edu/ceri                         20
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Knowledge for all. How open educational resources challenge the value-added model of higher education – Dirk van Damme

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Knowledge for all. How open educational resources challenge the value-added model of higher education – Dirk van Damme

  1. 1. KNOWLEDGE FOR ALL.HOW OPEN EDUCATIONAL RESOURCESCHALLENGE THE VALUE-ADDED MODEL OF HIGHER EDUCATION Dirk Van Damme Head of the Innovation and Measuring Progress Division – OECD/EDU
  2. 2. MIT OpenCourseware 2
  3. 3. OER• “Digital learning resources offered online (although sometimes in print) freely and openly to teachers, educators, students and independent learners in order to be used, shared, combined, adapted, and expanded in teaching, learning and research. They include learning content, software tools to develop, use and distribute, as well as implementation resources such as open licences.” (UNESCO) 3
  4. 4. OER• “OER are teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others. An open license is one that allows anyone to access, reuse, modify and share the OER.” (Hewlett Foundation) 4
  5. 5. OER• Educational resources that are freely available for use by educators and learners are growing and increasingly used – Increasingly digitised content materials (learning objects), such as texts, simulations, images, videos to complete courses – Available for learners, but also usable in formal education – Linked to other developments in „openness‟, such as open source software, open access publishing, and new approaches to collaborative flexible learning
  6. 6. The OER community & movement• MIT OpenCourseWare project (2001)• UNESCO (2002)• William and Flora Hewlett Foundation• OpenCourseware Consortium• Berlin and Cape Town Declarations• Open Universities• CERI, Knowledge for Free (2007)• Global Knowledge Sharing Initiative, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy• UNESCO-COL Guidelines (2011) 6
  7. 7. Recent developments• From content-only resources to full learning objects• Including also forms of assessment• And certification: „digital badges‟ 7
  8. 8. Benefits & risks• The potential benefits for public education are huge: – Improving access of underprivileged learners to quality resources – Reducing cost of developing learning materials – Improvement of quality, diversity and richness of learning resources in formal education – Innovating learning practices in formal education – Raising effectiveness of post-secondary education – Fostering lifelong learning and connecting formal and informal learning
  9. 9. Benefits & risks• But are also some risks, which probably ask for national and international policies: – Quality (assurance) of OER‟s – Language, geographical and cultural bias – Unbalanced streams of OER‟s between developed and emerging countries – Sustainability of business models in developing OER – Interoperability issues: users may find it difficult to locate, download, adapt and use regardless of platforms
  10. 10. Benefits & risks• For a long time, appropriate intellectual property licensing was an area with a lot of confusion, but recently the Creative Commons licenses are recognised as excellent and most widely used – CC BY: the most open, allows to freely distribute, remix, modify, even commercially, as long as initial creator is credited for – CC BY-SA: idem, but new versions need to be licensed as original – CC BY-ND: original can not be changed – Three other variants – Each license exists in 3 formats: legal, human readable, machine readable
  11. 11. Benefits ChallengesOpen and flexible learning Language and culturalopportunities sensitivityEfficiency and quality of Connectivitylearning resourcesCost-efficiency QualityInnovation Copyright and licensingSystemic transformative Sustainabilitycapacity 11
  12. 12. OER activity 12
  13. 13. Education level with OER activity 13
  14. 14. Relevance of benefits 14
  15. 15. Relevance of challenges 15
  16. 16. OER policy strategies 16
  17. 17. Strategic issues for HE• Integrating OERs in the institutional processes of teaching and learning can probably help to improve quality and relevance and to connect the institution better with state-of-the-art knowledge in a networked, globalised community, right? 17
  18. 18. Strategic issues for HE• Private cost of HE is rapidly increasing, but what are students exactly paying for? If content knowledge is no longer defining the unique selling proposition of higher education institutions, how should their added value be identified and marketed? Is a high private cost sustainable when more and more resources and even parts of the educational process are freely available? 18
  19. 19. Strategic issues for HE• Is it thinkable that individual portfolios of skills assessments and digital badges can become a more trustworthy alternative for employers than institutional qualifications? 19
  20. 20. Thank you !dirk.vandamme@oecd.org www.oecd.org/edu/ceri 20

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