Creative Commons Licences for School Libraries
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Creative Commons Licences for School Libraries

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This is a presentation given to LIANZA members, 19 May 2013.

This is a presentation given to LIANZA members, 19 May 2013.

More in: Education , Technology
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  • 1. 1. Copyright2. Creative Commons3. CC in schools policy4. Government policy5. Creative and cultural fields6. Students7. Search
  • 2. Lets begin with the obvious
  • 3. Potential of digital technologiesand the Internet to:
  • 4. Potential of digital technologiesand the Internet to:share teaching resources
  • 5. Potential of digital technologiesand the Internet to:share teaching resourcescollaborate
  • 6. Potential of digital technologiesand the Internet to:share teaching resourcescollaboratesave time and money
  • 7. Potential of digital technologiesand the Internet to:share teaching resourcescollaboratesave time and moneystop reinventing various wheels
  • 8. Potential of digital technologiesand the Internet to:share teaching resourcescollaboratesave time and moneystop reinventing various wheelsdisseminate our cultural heritage
  • 9. However:Two problems
  • 10. First problem:Copyright
  • 11. Second problem:Teachers dont hold copyright totheir resources
  • 12. Two solutions,but first....
  • 13. 1. Copyright
  • 14. What is copyright?
  • 15. Bundle of rights:copy, distribute, perform, adapt
  • 16. Automatic(no © required)
  • 17. *applies online*
  • 18. Lasts for 50 years after death
  • 19. But what is the purpose ofcopyright?
  • 20. Statute of Anne, 1710:“For the encouragement oflearning”
  • 21. USA Constitution:“To promote the progress ofscience and useful arts.”
  • 22. The commons is a public good+People need an incentive tocreate=Limited monopoly, i.e. copyright=A vibrant culture
  • 23. However...
  • 24. Copyright the opportunities andproblems of print culture“Caxton Showing the First Specimen of His Printing to King Edward IV at the Almonry, Westminster,” by Daniel Maclise, 1851.
  • 25. ‘All Rights Reserved’ copyrightrestricts the potential of digitaltechnologies and the Internet
  • 26. What to do?“Grayson, Westley, Stanislaus County, Western San Joaquin Valley, California. Seventh andeighth grade class in Westley school after lesson in Geography” 1940, US National Archives 83-G-41445, via Flickr. No known copyright.
  • 27. 1. Copyright2. Creative Commons
  • 28. Public DomainFew Restrictions
  • 29. Public DomainFew RestrictionsAll Rights ReservedFew Freedoms
  • 30. Public DomainFew RestrictionsAll Rights ReservedFew FreedomsSome Rights ReservedRange of Licence Options
  • 31. Four Licence Elements
  • 32. Attribution
  • 33. Non Commercial
  • 34. No Derivatives
  • 35. Share Alike
  • 36. Six Licences
  • 37. More free More restrictive
  • 38. More free More restrictive
  • 39. More free More restrictive
  • 40. More free More restrictive
  • 41. More free More restrictive
  • 42. More free More restrictive
  • 43. More free More restrictive
  • 44. More free More restrictive
  • 45. Retaincopyright:CreativeCommonslicencepermission inadvance“2500 Creative Commons Licences” by qthomasbower, via Flickr.Made available under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 licence.
  • 46. Go to creativecommons.org/choose
  • 47. LayersLicence symbolHuman readableLawyer readable<a rel="license"href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/"<<img alt="Creative CommonsLicense" style="border-width:0"src="http://i.creativecommons.org/l/by/3.0/88x31.png" /<</a<<br /<This work islicensed under a <a rel="license"href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/"<Creative Commons Attribution 3.0Unported License</a<
  • 48. However...
  • 49. You cant apply a CC licence ifyou dont hold copyright
  • 50. Teachers dont hold copyright totheir teaching resources
  • 51. 1. Copyright2. Creative Commons3. CC in schools policy
  • 52. All teaching materials:Creative Commons Attribution
  • 53. 1. No need to ask permission
  • 54. 1. No need to ask permission2. Keep resources when youleave
  • 55. 1. No need to ask permission2. Keep resources when youleave3. Teachers receive credit whentheir work is reused
  • 56. Case studies atcreativecommons.org.nz
  • 57. “When I look outside at otherschools, I think, why aren’t youdoing this?”Nathan Parker, WarringtonSchool
  • 58. “Teachers are collaboratingmore, and they’re also involvingtheir students in thedevelopment of those teachingand learning resources.”Mark Osborne, ASHS
  • 59. 1. Copyright2. Creative Commons3. CC in schools policy4. Government policyBeehive, Wellington, NZ. Creative Commons AttributionNon Commerical No Derivatives by stewartbaird by Flickr.
  • 60. NZGOAL:Government guidance, approvedby Cabinet
  • 61. NZGOAL:a)Provides a framework forrelease using CC BYa)Advocates release using CC BY
  • 62. 2. “It is widely recognised, in New Zealand andabroad, that significant creative and economicpotential may lie dormant in such copyright andnon-copyright material when locked up inagencies and not released on terms allowing re-use by others.”...3. “The Government wants to encourage therealisation of this potential.”
  • 63. BoTs are “invited” to:1) become familiar with NZGOAL2) take NZGOAL into account whenreleasing copyright material
  • 64. Case Studies:Ministry for the EnvironmentWellington City CouncilLINZTe Papa
  • 65. 1. Copyright2. Creative Commons3. CC in schools policy4. Government policy5. Creative and cultural fields“Tosca Olinsky, American painter, 1909-1984,”date unknown, Smithsonian American ArtMuseum J0115443, via Flickr. No knowcopyright.
  • 66. i) New ‘Business Models’
  • 67. Creative Commons licences allowsfor changes in:1) production (new forms)2) distribution (new channels)3) consumption (read only →read/write)
  • 68. Case Studies:Meena KadriBronwyn Holloway-SmithDisasteradioOpen Source CinemaUttarayan Sunset by Meena Kadri/MeanestIndian, via Flickr. This image is madeavailable under a Creative CommonsAttribution Non Commercial No Derivativeslicence.
  • 69. ii) Culture and Heritage
  • 70. Many cultural works are incopyright but not commericalviable
  • 71. Where public money is involved,we advocate for open licensing
  • 72. The infamous low hanging fruit.1. Public domain works→ use the public domain mark2. Materials with easy permissions→ CC friendly donors3. Institutions own copyright→ release according to NZGOAL
  • 73. iii) Public Funding
  • 74. The taxpayer—via CreativeNZ, NZOn Air, etc—funds a lot of culture
  • 75. Many publicly funded culturalworks will not enter the publicdomain till at least 2100
  • 76. Creative Commons can givepublicly funded work a second life
  • 77. 1. Copyright2. Creative Commons3. CC in schools policy4. Government policy5. Creative and cultural fields6. StudentsBanks College students playing leap frog. Wellesley College :Photographs relating to Wellesley College, Banks College and Croydon School.Ref: 1/2-147264-F. Alexander Turnbull Library, Wellington, New Zealand. http://natlib.govt.nz/records/22901144
  • 78. Creative Commons is a great wayto teach students aboutcopyright
  • 79. Creative Commons shifts theconversation from what studentscan’t do, to what they can.
  • 80. Teach students to critically,creatively and legally engagewith their intellectual andcultural heritageread only → read/write
  • 81. Mix & Mash 2013: The New Storytellingmixandmash.org.nzPrizes of $50, $500 and $2000
  • 82. Screenshot of “Manny’s Story” by Casey Carsel, via Youtube. Made available under aCreative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence
  • 83. 1. Copyright2. Creative Commons3. CC in schools policy4. Government policy5. Creative and cultural fields6. Students7. SearchPhotograph of Card Catalog inCentral Search Room, 1942, USNational Archives, via Flickr. Noknown copyright.
  • 84. More than 700 million works
  • 85. General: search.creativecommons.orgNew Zealand: digitalnz.orgMedia: commons.wikimedia.orgPhotos from Flickr: flickr.com/creativecommons orcompfight.orgMusic: Jamendo.orgPublic domain movies and music: archive.orgVideo: vimeo.com/creativecommons
  • 86. creativecommons.org.nz@cc_Aotearoaadmin@creativecommons.org.nzfacebook.com/creativecommonsnz