Evaluating Technology for Early Learners

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Webinar slides originally presented by Dr. Dale McManis on September 22, 2011, reviewing best practice tip for selecting developmentally appropriate technology for children.

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  • Some of the key points here are learning-hence the educational component. the resulting outcome-performance. Covers the gamut from development --to the use --to how it is implemented and managed. Taps into both what is available –resources. And then the processes—what does educational technology look like when it is put into practice each day.
  • You may be interested to know some of the major groups concerned with and focusing on educational technology. These include (but there are others):AECT = Association for Educational Communications and TechnologyISTE = International Society for Technology in EducationUSDOEOET = US Department of Education Office of Educational Technology- they have a national plan you can access on line.NAEYC = National Association for the Education of Young Children –work is specific to early childhood (birth to 8) and they are about to release a revised position statement on the use of technology with young children
  • Most of us here are probably quite familiar with the term “developmentally appropriate” but we want to be intentional about understanding what that means when we are talking about educational technology. The heart of the term stays constant based on knowledge of how children learn and develop, the context is what is different. So we still need teaching practices appropriate to children’s age and developmental status.They need to be attuned to children as unique and individual, and attentive to their social and cultural livesThe learning goals and experiences match these but are challenging enough to promote progress and maintain interest.
  • Many skilled and thoughtful writers have brought this shift to our intention. Some of these folks include Doug Clements , Julie Sarama, and David Shade.They’ve done so because of groundbreaking work and then confirmation work by people like Susan Haugland, June Wright, and their own work. This careful work has shown us that young children (namely 3, 4, and 5 year olds) on average have reached a developmental level where they are ready and able to engage with technologyphysically they have enough basic fine motor skills to operate the technology and cognitively they have a long enough and focused enough attention span to do so.Additionally, they show very high interest and motivation for using technologySo let’s take a quick tour.
  • Especially from the early eighties through now, a large body of research is present on young children using computers we’ve learned there can be many very positive outcomes when young children use developmentally appropriate educational technology. One way to conceptualize this is through thinking about it as “school readiness” Let’s take a look at some of the highlights.
  • Preschoolers’ language activity, measured as words spoken per minute, is almost twice as high at the computer as at any of the other activities, including playdough, blocks, art, or games (Muhlstein & Croft, 1986). children in a preschool setting setting tell longer and more structured stories following a computer graphics presentation than following a static presentation or no stimulus (Riding & Tite, 1985).computer-assisted instruction (CAI) drills and tutorials to help students develop prereading and reading skills. computer graphic representations of words enhance word recognitionand recall in beginning reading (Shapira, 1995). As another example, a large effect (more than 1 standard deviation) of a research-based computer program has been shown on kindergartners’ phonological awareness(Foster, Erickson, Foster, Brinkman, & Torgesen, 1994).For example, empirical evidence indicates that the capabilities ofcomputer-based writing can encourage a fluid idea of the written word andfree young children from mechanical concerns (Bangert-Drowns, 1993; Jones& Pellegrini, 1996). In general, children using word processors write more, havefewer fine motor control problems, worry less about making mistakes, andmake fewer mechanical errors (Clements, 1987a; Daiute, 1988; Hawisher,1989; Kurth, 1988; Phenix & Hannan, 1984; Roblyer et al., 1988). Such benefits result in increased abilities in composition. threeyear- olds used the computer in a self-selected language experience activityfor two years. Children showed steady improvement in spelling and storywriting, including invented spellings (Moxley, Warash, Coffman, Brinton, &Concannon, 1997). When they were 4 years of age, they performed better than another group of children who engaged in similar activities but had not received such experiences as 3-year-olds.Young children can learn to competently revise their text when shown how to use the computer to edit their words. They improve their style using more descriptive phrases and also create better plots with climaxes and character descriptions (Wright, 1994). Additionally their attitude towards writing improves (Chang & Osguthorpe, 1990; Green, 1991; Holmes & Godlewski, 1995).Three-year-olds learned sorting from a computer task as easily asfrom a concrete doll task (Brinkley & Watson, 1987-88a).CAI or Drill and practice software can help young children develop competence in such skills as counting and sorting (Clements & Nastasi, 1993). Indeed, some reviewers claim that the largest gains in the use of CAI have been in mathematics for preschool (Fletcher- Flinn & Gravatt, 1995) or primary grade children (Lavin & Sanders, 1983; Niemiec & Walberg, 1984; Ragosta et al.,1981). “computer manipulatives.” Researchers observing such use observe that children learn to understand and apply concepts such as symmetry, patterns and spatial order (Wright, 1994).
  • As one example, children at the computer spent nine times as much time talking to peers while on the computer than while doing puzzles (Muller & Perlmutter, 1985).Even in the preschool classroom, a computer center fosters a positive climate characterized by praise and encouragement of peers (Klinzing & Hall, 1985). The addition of a computer center does not disrupt ongoing play, but ratherfacilitates extensive positive social interaction, cooperation, and helpingbehaviors (Binder & Ledger, 1985; King & Alloway, 1992; Rhee & Chavnagri,1991; Rosengren et al., 1985).
  • They show higher positive affect and Interest when they use the computer together (Shade, 1994) . When children are in control, they create fantasy in computer programs beyond theproducers’ imaginations (Escobedo, 1992; Wright & Samaras, 1986). To the long list of reported positive effects of computer use with children,add problem-solving skills (Nastasi et al., 1990), decision-making ability,understanding of cause and effect, (Goodwin, Goodwin, & Garel, 1986;Hutinger & Johanson, 2000), and longer attention spans (Fatouros, 1995; Haugland, 1992; Hutinger & Johanson, 2000).
  • Just will highlight one study….Special needs preschool children in made progress in all developmental areas, including social-emotional, fine motor, gross motor, communication, cognition, andself-help. A measure of development showed that upon joining the program, children were making an average gain of .52 months per month. While participating in the computer-based program, children were making anaverage rate of progress of 1.81 months per month. After participation, 14 of the 15 children who participated for two years doubled their per month gain;6 had developmental scores that exceeded their chronological scores for thefirst time in their lives (Hutinger & Johanson, 2000). Results indicated that the computer made a unique contribution. Across 11 common classroom activities, including play, books, computer, art, and snack time, result sshowed that computer use was most often followed by desirable behaviorssuch as sharing, communicating, taking turns, and focusing and least likely to be followed by aggression (Hutinger & Johanson, 2000).
  • Well, we have done a very fast walk through of the foundational research literature. This work is pretty much exclusively based on traditional computers…most often desktops. But this has changed. Next we are going to take a quick look at newer technologies and discuss the available research. Most of this is usability, but is showing promise for what can be even stronger and more diverse types of positive outcomes.
  • Interactive whiteboards are considered the most valuable digital resource.Interactive whiteboards top teachers’ wish lists for technology that they believe they need.Teachers cite many reasons for their strong affinity for interactive whiteboards: 93% of teachers who use this technology say it helps them to be more effective, 91% helps them to be more creative, 83 percent say it increases student motivation,78% stimulates student dis­cussions, 75% stimulates student creativ­ity and 70% it is directly related to student achievement. Could be a bridge from traditional pedagogy—the teacher in the front of the class delivering informa­tion—to a more collaborative culture of learning supported by technology.------------ No Content ------Overall, these findings suggest that media and technology resources are making their way into pre–K classrooms, albeit in ways that suggest more tentative and, perhaps, skeptical integration by pre–K teachers. Half of pre-K teachers (50 percent) believe that the content available in fee-based resources is not appropriate for their students’ age or ability.
  • Wood in 2001 conducted a study on almost 30 preschools in the UK that had IWBs.Those children who would not normally choose to work on the computer were doing so with the IWB, with their teachers observing that they could do the activities without needing the fine-motor skills required to operate a mouse. (Wood 2001).
  • where IWBs were installed at the right height for preschool aged children, teachers noted greater collaboration and sharing of the task than was typical of work at a desktop computer
  • Our own work at Hatch Early Childhood includes a recent study on IWBs with literacy and mathematics content where we found preschool children made significant gains on school readiness screeners over the course of a school year. (After 6 months 82% were ready to read and 92% were school ready in math)
  • Decidedly the technology that has gotten the most attention and has made its way most quickly into classrooms is mobile technologies particularly tablets. Lay articles, blogs, and groups are all abuzz and the conversation has already moved from “should we use this technology” to “is anyone else using this technology” to “how can I use this technology?”This is really an area where the research has yet to catch up but there are a couple of studies that have looked at using these devices with young children and the results are worth noting….
  • In a study with stylus driven tablets children were able to transfer from one model to another with a year in between with no trouble (Couse & Chen, 2010).In a study with touchscreen tablet (ProjectLamp, 2011), children learned to use the technology and the apps very quickly.-------------Children showed the ability to interact with the educational technology independently. They persisted even with glitches such as slow response. They exhibited confidence and freedom in experimenting with different options.---------------Now that we have talked a bit about the newer technologies, we want to turn to the really vital question…..
  • This is a very active area of research and takes us back to the shift in the question from should we use technology with young learners to how best can we do so.Incorporating or integrating educational technology is like thinking about a higher order skill where the sum of the parts are greater than the individual components themselves. We will take a look at some areas to consider.
  • Flipping the situation from how to fit technology into the program, and instead thinking about what you would like to see as a result of using it.-our children will get exposure to literacy skills in ways that will help them advance and be better prepared--have opportunities to learn about cooperation and sharing--save and revisit their projects over time--our teachers will be able to save children’s work in digital formats and more easily share and dialogue with parents, colleagues, and administrators--to collaborate with each other on planning and saving activities and lessons --our children and teachers will gain in confidence about using technology--our children and teachers will have fun!
  • Using educational technology just like any other experience is about the children connecting with the teacher and with one another. Plowman L, Stephen C., McPake, J. (2010) use the term guided interaction. This encompasses There are many ways to conceptualize supported learning within the Vygotskyan tradition, includingscaffolding (Wood, Bruner & Ross, 1976), assisted performance (Tharp & Gallimore, 1989), Dialogic inquiry (Wells, 1999) and guided participation (Rogoffet al., 1993). Guided interaction shares with them an emphasis on the mediation of learning, but differs in its focus on technology-mediated learning and its attention to both the proximal and distal dimensions of providing support.
  • Where computers are placed and the amount of time they can use them is important. Let’s dig a bit into the second point. There is a HUGE amount of debate about how much time should young children use technology and from my reading, virtually none of the recommendations are based on research. But there is some…..A small number of sessions with simplereadiness software may have little or no effect; for example, three 20-minutesessions with simple readiness software failed to show an effect on preschoolers’prereading concepts (Goodwin, Goodwin, Nansel, & Helm, 1986).In contrast, placing computers in kindergartners’ classrooms for severalmonths significantly increases reading readiness skills; placing them in the home as well yields greater gains (Hess & McGarvey, 1987). About 10minutes work with CAI per day can significantly benefit primary gradechildrens’ reading skill development (Childers, 1989; Lavin & Sanders, 1983;Murphy & Appel, 1984; Ragosta, Holland, & Jamison, 1981; Silfen & Howes,1984; Stone, 1996; Teague, Wilson, & Teague, 1984). Similarly, preschoolerscan develop such reading readiness abilities as visual discrimination andletter naming (Lin, Vallone, & Lepper, 1985; Smithy-Willis, Riley, & Smith,1982; Swigger & Campbell, 1981).This is really being recognized in the research literature as critically important to whether integration happens or does not happen. The challenge will be to help it become more of a reality….Despite increased access to technology for children and teachers, an area of substantial difficulty is effectively integrating these technologies into programs. The classroom teacher is the critical factor in the full development and use of technology1,2and while teachers want to learn to use educational technology effectively, the lack of time, access, and support are barriers3. In particular, lack of professional development for technology use is one of the most serious obstacles to fully integrating technology into the curriculum 1,4,5. U.S. Congress, Office of Technology Assessment. (1995). 2 Trotter, A. (1999). 3 Guhlin, M. (1996). 4 Fatemi, E. (1999). 5 Panel on Educational Technology, President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology. (1997, March). This has led many writers to focus on the concept of sustained staff development. Training must be ongoing and systematic if teachers are to properly complete the "learning cycle" of technology-related professional development (Kinnaman, D.E. (1990).
  • For example, to acquire and transfer the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively integrate technology into their classrooms, teachers must have substantial time which can range from 30 plus hours to several years to fully support higher-order thinking skills, decision making, and collaboration in students (Sheingold & Hadley; 1990
  • Brining our knowledge about teaching, technology and content together is key and it is here where children have the greatest potential for learning. Being adopted in preservice programs and research done in this area…a conceptually based theoretical framework about the relationship between technology and teaching can transform the conceptualization and the practice of teacher education, teacher training, and teachers’ professional development. The basis of the framework is the understanding that teaching is a highly complex activity that draws on many kinds of knowledge. Pedagogical knowledge (PK) being deep knowledge about the processes and practices of teaching and learning … is then combined with knowledge about howtechnology and content are reciprocally related.This results in use technologies in constructive ways to teach content
  • Like to share a project..it was multi-year (3). Forty-six early childhood professionals were engaged in a three-year model of in-depth technology workshops and monthly onsite follow-up visits. 16 preschool classrooms within eight schools in an urban school district The workshops were structured to lead participants from basic computer operations and use of peripheral devices (i.e. digital cameras, scanners), software evaluation and selection, toward the goal of integration of technology within the curriculum. A major focus was on the role of teachers in supporting young children between the ages of three and five years as they grow in technological competence. teachers began to apply constructivist ideas related to computer activities to other areas of their professional practice. Teachers rearranged classrooms, re-invented learning centers, and modified their interactions with children. Further, Tech4PreK training led to positive attitudes, greater technology expertise, and skill in scaffolding children’s computer use among teachers. Most of us are familiar with scaffolding when working with children. Intuitive programs and software can now do this to some extent as well. computers can be successful in increasing a variety of verbal and languageskills, especially when they provide scaffolding, or assistance, to the learner,which is gradually withdrawn (Shute & Miksad, 1997). Then there is scaffolding that occurs as teachers support children to use the technology as a tool. In the Barbuto project, Over time, teachers provided less direct prompting. They positioned themselves proximal to the children at the computer, offering a suggestion or two only when requested by a child. As children’s competence and confidence grew, teachers’ statements to children acknowledged a trust in their budding capabilities, “I know you can figure that out by yourself.”
  • Assessment & Progress monitoringEase of useSharing capabilities
  • Additional FeaturesCustomizationAbility to create
  • ImplementationProfessional Development
  • “Just spending money on computers without a plan will have a low probability of increasing achievement; however, spending a small bit in each classroom probably will not either. Large-scale, research-based model projects followed by planned implementation of successful models appears to be a wiser strategy.” (p. 36)Clements & Sarama, 2003
  • Evaluating Technology for Early Learners

    1. 1. Why and How to EvaluateTechnology for Early Learners September 22, 2011
    2. 2. Stick Around for Your Chance to Win! Also find out how to receive your Technology Evaluation Toolkit!Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    3. 3. WebEx Technology Having trouble with the software? Call this number: 1-866-863-3910Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    4. 4. Today’s Speakers Dale McManis, Ph.D Jenne Parks, M.S. Director of Research Early Learning Content Hatch Specialist, HatchEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    5. 5. Let’s Get Started! Why & How to Evaluate Technology for Early Learners Presented by: Dr. Dale McManis & Jenne ParksEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    6. 6. Road Map • What is educational technology? • What does the research say? • How do we integrate it into the classroom? • How can we evaluate it? • What does a typical technology- enriched day look like?Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    7. 7. What is Educational Technology?Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    8. 8. From an Adult Expert “ Educational technology is the study & ethical practice of facilitating learning & improving performance by creating, using & managing appropriate technological processes ” & resources. Association for Educational Communications and Technology, 2008Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    9. 9. From an Child Expert “ I like computers because they teach me so much and if I had a friend who didn’t have a computer, I would tell him the cat and cow story is my favorite because it is so funny! They go to another country with the cat on the cow! ” Sebastian, 5 years Mudpies Child Development Center Winston-Salem, NCEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    10. 10. Groups Making GuidelinesEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    11. 11. What is developmentally appropriate practice for technology? • Age & developmental status • Promote progress • Maintain interest NAEYC Draft Position Statement “Technology in Early Childhood Programs” 2011Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    12. 12. Outcomes-Based Research The question is no longer should we have educational technology? The question now is how can we best use technology for education?Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    13. 13. Why has the Question Changed? • 30 years of Research • Positive Outcomes for Early LearnersEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    14. 14. Cognitive Development • Language • Literacy Foster et al., 1994; Muhlstein & Croft, 1986; Riding & Tite, 1985; Shapira, 1995Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    15. 15. Cognitive Development • Writing • Math Bangert-Drowns, 1993; Holmes & Godlewski, 1995; Jones & Pellegrini, 1996; Moxley et al., 1997 Brinkley & Watson, 1987 & 1988; Clements & Natasi, 1993; Wright, 1994Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    16. 16. Social-Emotional Development • Encouragement • Cooperation • Collaboration King & Alloway, 1992; Klinzing & Hall, 1985; Muller & Perlmutter, 1985; Rhee & Chavnagri, 1991Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    17. 17. Advanced Skills • Motivation • Higher-Order Thinking • Meta-Cognition Escobedo, 1992; Goodwin et al., 1986; Nastasi et al., 1990; Shade, 1994Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    18. 18. Special Needs • Social-Emotional • Fine Motor • Gross Motor • Communication • Cognition • Self-Help Hutinger & Johanson, 2000Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    19. 19. Where are we going?Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    20. 20. Interactive Whiteboards • Teachers want them • Concerned about lack of appropriate content Grunwald & PBS, 2009, 2011Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    21. 21. • children spend more time engaged Children spend more time engaged Wood, 2001 Wood, 2001Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    22. 22. Children collaborate more Wood, 2001Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    23. 23. 82% Ready to Read & 92% School Ready in Math School readiness improves McManis et al., 2010Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    24. 24. Mobile Technologies • Children learn to use them quickly • Encourages independenceEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    25. 25. • Enhances mastery of concepts • Explore more complex and abstract conceptsEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    26. 26. How can YOU integrate educational technology into the classroom?Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    27. 27. Target the results you wantEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    28. 28. Make it about connecting with the childrenEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    29. 29. Integration is EssentialEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    30. 30. Takes time to fully support children’s learning Sheingold & Hadley, 1990Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    31. 31. Sustained Staff Development: Bringing It All Together Mishra & Koehler, 2006; Haugland, 1998Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    32. 32. Teacher Training = Increased 1) Interactions 2) Constructivist Ideas 3) Scaffolding Shute & Miksad, 1997Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    33. 33. Road Map • What is educational technology? • What does the research say? • How do we integrate it into the classroom? • How can we evaluate it? • What does a typical technology- enriched day look like?Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    34. 34. Selecting Appropriate • Goals • Technology Educational • Content Technology Clements & Sarama, 2003Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    35. 35. Learning Goals • Approaches to Learning • Cognitive • Social-EmotionalEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    36. 36. Interactive Technology Desktops Whiteboards Mobile Devices Multi-touch TablesEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    37. 37. Is this content… • Worthwhile? • Appropriate? • Relevant?Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    38. 38. Educational ValueEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    39. 39. Age-Appropriate • Subject Matter • Skill Level • Interest & Appeal • Free of BiasEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    40. 40. Child FriendlyEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    41. 41. Captures EngagementEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    42. 42. Assessment & Progress MonitoringEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    43. 43. Additional FeaturesEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    44. 44. Integration into the ClassroomEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    45. 45. A Day in the Life…Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    46. 46. A Look at the Lesson Plan This Week’s Goals: 1) Vocabulary & Phonological Awareness 2) Counting & Patterning 3) Living & Non-Living 4) Leadership & CooperationEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    47. 47. One Day, Endless Chances for IntegrationEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    48. 48. Flexibility To Meet Individual & Group NeedsEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    49. 49. For your viewing pleasure…Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    50. 50. Closing Thought “ Just spending moneyplan will have computers without a on a low probability of increasing achievement… ” Clements & Sarama, 2003Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchexperts | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    51. 51. Speaker Contact Information Dale McManis, Ph.D. Jenne Parks, M.S. Director of Research Early Learning Content Hatch Specialist, Hatch DMcManis@HatchEarlyLearning.com JParks@HatchEarlyLearning.comEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    52. 52. Interactive Technology & Learning Activities Brought to you by The Early Learning ExpertsEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    53. 53. Touchscreen Solutions + Research-Based Activities = Better Student Results RECENT STUDY of Hatch TeachSmart Learning System: 82% “ready to read” & 92% “school ready” in mathEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    54. 54. NEXT SESSION: October 6th @ 2PM EST Research-Based Claims– Can You Trust What Businesses Say? Dr. Kyle Snow Director of the Center for Applied Research NAEYCEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    55. 55. October 13th @ 2PM EST Supporting Early Learners with Technology Susan Gunnewig Director of Product Development, Hatch October 25th @ 2PM EST 5 Big Ideas for The Future of Early Childhood David Kirp Author of “KIDS FIRST” November 15th @ 2PM EST How “Screen Time” Impacts Toddlers & Preschoolers Lisa Guernsey Director of the Early Education Initiative at New America FoundationEarly Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.
    56. 56. And the Winner Is… You will receive your Technology Evaluation Toolkit & eBook from Hatch by email in the next week!Early Learning Technology | www.HatchEarlyLearning.com #hatchinars | Copyright 2011 Hatch Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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