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Instructional strategies for technology integration

  1. 1. Instructional Strategies for Technology Integration RONALD M. SUPLIDO JR.
  2. 2. Are you ready for a wonderful virtual trip around the world? • Identify where on earth can we find these world famous landmarks?
  3. 3. 1. The Statue of Liberty in New York, USA
  4. 4. 2.The Great Sphinx at Giza, Egypt
  5. 5. 3. The Great Wall in China
  6. 6. 4. The Taj Mahal in Agra, India
  7. 7. 5. Lascaux in France
  8. 8. What instructional technologies do you use?
  9. 9. Why should we use technology?
  10. 10. WHAT ISTECHNOLOGY? Any tool used as a means of performing an operation or achieving an end Businesses use newer tools to perform that operation more efficiently or achieve that end more effectively.
  11. 11. Are my students learning? Can I be more effective? Can I be more efficient?
  12. 12. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION It is the use of technology tools in general content areas in education in order to allow students to apply computer and technology skills to learning and problem-solving. Generally speaking, the curriculum drives the use of technology and not vice versa.
  13. 13. “Technology decisions are... teaching and learning decisions.” –Wilbert J. McKeachie's TeachingTips
  14. 14. This presentation report aims to discuss the following points/objectives: • What is technology? • Technology Use vs.Technology Integration • Technology Integration Matrix • Teaching withTechnology • Types ofTechnology Integration • Integrative Pedagogy (TPACK & SAMR) • LearningTheory • The Pedagogy Wheel
  15. 15. Technology use vs. technology integration
  16. 16. • Arbitrary • Random & sporadic • Focused on the technology • Used mostly by instructor to deliver content & information • Used individually Using Technology
  17. 17. Technology Integration • Planned and purposeful • Part of the culture/environment of the classroom or program • Supports learning objectives • Used mostly by the students to create, construct, and connect knowledge • Used to facilitate collaboration
  18. 18. 5 essential elements of meaningful learning with technology
  19. 19. 5 levels of technology integration Infusion Instructor provides the learning contexts & students choose the tech to achieve the outcome Entry Instructor uses tech tools to deliver content Transformation Instructor encourages the innovative use of tech Adaptation Instructor facilitates students exploring and independently using tech Adoption Instructor directs students in conventional, procedural use of tech
  20. 20. Technology Integration Matrix Entry Adoption Adaptation Infusion Transformation Active Constructive Cooperative Authentic Intentional Where are you?
  21. 21. STUDENTS • What are the students' expectations of technology? • What are the students' experience with technology? • Can all students access the technology? • How will technology affect the roles and responsibilities of the students? • What factors may influence student perception and use of technology?
  22. 22. Technology Adoption Model External Variables Perceived Usefulness Perceived Ease of Use Actual Use Behavioral Intention to Use Attitude Towards Using
  23. 23. INSTRUCTOR • How much skill/experience do you have using technology? • How much time do you have? • What is your role as an instructor? • What are your expectations of technology?
  24. 24. INSTITUTION • Is the infrastructure in place for students to use the technology? • What support services are available for the students and instructor? • What is the technology "culture" of the institution?
  25. 25. • Communication & collaboration • Presentation & information sharing • Information searching & resource management • Learning management systems TECHNOLOGY TOOLS
  26. 26. ASSURE good learning • A —Analyze learners • S — State standards & objectives • S — Select strategies, technology, media & materials • U — Utilize technology, media & materials • R — Require learner participation • E — Evaluate & revise
  27. 27. EVALUATION • Did the use of technology help students achieve objectives? • How did the use of technology help change students' engagement in learning? • How did the use of technology change teaching behaviors and practices? • Did the technology improve teaching effectiveness and efficiency?
  28. 28. Types of technology integration • ONLINE LEARNINGAND BLENDEDCLASSROOMS • PROJECT BASEDACTIVITIES INCORPORATINGTECHNOLOGY • GAME BASED LEARNINGAND ASSESMENT • LEARNINGWITH MOBILEAND HANDLED DEVICES • INSTRUCTIONALSTOOLS LIKE INTERACTIVEWHITEBOARDSAND STUDENT RESPONSE SYSTEMS • WEB-BASED PROJECTS , EXPLORATIONS,AND RESEARCH • STUDENTCREATED MEDIA LIKE PODCASTS,VIDEOS,OR SLIDESHOWS • COLLABORATIVEONLINETOOLS LIKEWIKISOR GOOGLE DOCS • USING SOCIAL MEDIATO ENGAGE STUDENTS
  29. 29. Types of technology integration • ONLINE LEARNING AND BLENDED CLASSROOMS
  30. 30. Types of technology integration • PROJECT BASED ACTIVITIES INCORPORATINGTECHNOLOGY
  31. 31. Types of technology integration • GAME-BASED LEARNING AND ASSESSMENT
  32. 32. Types of technology integration • LEARNING WITH MOBILE AND HANDLED DEVICES
  33. 33. Types of technology integration • INSTRUCTIONALS TOOLS LIKE INTERACTIVE WHITEBOARDS AND STUDENT RESPONSE SYSTEMS
  34. 34. Types of technology integration • WEB-BASED PROJECTS , EXPLORATIONS, AND RESEARCH
  35. 35. Types of technology integration • STUDENT CREATED MEDIA LIKE PODCASTS,VIDEOS, OR SLIDESHOWS
  36. 36. Types of technology integration • COLLABORATIVEONLINETOOLS LIKEWIKISOR GOOGLE DOCS
  37. 37. Types of technology integration • USING SOCIAL MEDIATO ENGAGE STUDENTS
  38. 38. How to know if your technology is integrated? • An outside observer would view the use of technology as a seamless component of the lesson. • Students work toward a lesson-relevant goal. • The technology activity is a logical extension of the lesson. • A real problem is being solved by the use of technology. • You can describe how a particular student is benefiting from technology.. • You would have trouble accomplishing your learning goals if he technology were removed. • You can explain what the technology is supposed to do in a few sentences. • All students are able to participate. • Student are genuinely interested and enthusiastic about learning. • More cool stuff is happening than you expected.
  39. 39. Integrative Pedagogy
  40. 40. –DavidThornburg “Any teacher that can be replaced with a computer, deserves to be.”
  41. 41. Two pedagogical models for enhancing technology integration • TPCK (or TPACK) -Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge • SAMR - Substitution, Augmentation, Modification, Redefinition
  42. 42. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge T C P
  43. 43. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge T C P
  44. 44. Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge T C P TPCK
  45. 45. SAMR Model
  46. 46. SAMR MODEL • The Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition Model offers a method of seeing how computer technology might impact teaching and learning. It also shows a progression that adopters of educational technology often follow as they progress through teaching and learning with technology. • While one might argue over whether an activity can be defined as one level or another, the important concept to grasp here is the level of student engagement. One might well measure progression along these levels by looking at who is asking the important questions. As one moves along the continuum, computer technology becomes more important in the classroom but at the same time becomes more invisibly woven into the demands of good teaching and learning.
  47. 47. Learning Theory Instructivism ConnectivismConstructivism
  48. 48. Connectivism Constructivism Learning Theory Instructivism
  49. 49. INSTRUCTIVISM • Teacher- and institutionally-centered. • Knowledge is created by instructors and institutions and is delivered to students. • Teachers and institutions create the processes and conditions for success.
  50. 50. CONSTRUCTIVISM • Teacher moves into facilitator role, promoting peer- to-peer learning. • Students create and construct their own knowledge, building on foundations of previous learning. • Knowledge is socially constructed. • Knowledge is external to the user and learning is the act of internalizing knowledge. • Learning is a social process. • Meaning is created by the learner.
  51. 51. • Lots of overlap with constructivism. Relationships and networks are a primary source of learning. Focuses on building a network of knowledge sources to access whenever you need them. • Knowledge rests in diversity of opinions. • Learning is a process of connecting information sources & may reside in non-human devices • Capacity to know is more critical than what is known • Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning • Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill • Decision-making itself is a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality (meta-cognition). CONNECTIVISM
  52. 52. PEDAGOGYWHEEL
  53. 53. There is a growing body of evidence that technology integration positively affects student achievement and academic performance. When used in collaborative learning methods and leadership that is aimed at improving the school through technology planning, technology impacts achievement in content area learning, promotes higher-order thinking and problem solving skills, and prepares students for the workforce. CONCLUSION
  54. 54. Kids AREN’T motivated by technology. Instead, they’re motivated by opportunities to make a difference in the world; they are motivated by opportunities to ask and answer their own questions; and they are motivated by opportunities to learn together with like-minded peers. Digital tools CAN make all of that work possible — but until we start seeing technology as nothing MORE than a tool, we’ll keep wasting time and cash on products that do nothing to change learning in meaningful ways for our kids. CONCLUSION
  55. 55. “Effective integration of technology is achieved when students are able to select technology tools to help them obtain information in a timely manner, analyze and synthesize the information, and present it professionally. The technology should become an integral part of how the classroom functions—as accessible as all other classroom tools.” CONCLUSION - NATIONAL EDUCATIONALTECHNOLOGY STANDARDS FOR STUDENTS, INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FORTECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

Editor's Notes

  • Active - students are actively engaged in using tech
    Cooperative - students use tech to collaborate with others
    Constructive - students use tech to connect new information to their prior knowledge
    Authentic - students use tech to link learning activities to the "real world"
    Intentional - students use tech to set goals, plan activities, monitor progress, and evaluate results
  • Entry - instructor uses tech tools to deliver content, teacher is in control
    Adoption - instructor directs students in conventional, procedural use of tech, teacher makes decisions about when/how students use the technology, students need a procedural understanding
    Adaptation - instructor facilitates students exploring and independently using tech, teacher guides the students in using tech, students are able to use the tech independently without procedural instruction and begin to explore the technology
    Infusion - instructor provides the learning contexts and students choose the tech to achieve the outcome, a range of tech tools are integrated flexibly into the classroom, students make decisions about how to use technology
    Transformation - instructor encourages innovative use of tech, students are self-directed in using tech to facilitate higher order thinking and to complete learning activities not possible before

    Developed by Univ of Southern Florida for K-12 education. TIM focuses on pedagogy NOT tech tools.

    As you move up the levels, there is greater student ownership of learning, and a shift from procedural to conceptual understanding, a move from conventional to complex use, a shift from lower-order to higher-order thinking and skills
  • Big mistake - assuming students are "digital natives" and will just get it. Digital native coined by Marc Prensky in 2001. Although this terminology is thrown about frequently in popular media, it is at best simplified and at worst inaccurate. Studies show that there continues to be a "digital divide" among young people (usually due to access or parental restrictions) and that young people who do use tech use it in a very narrow way (texting, gaming, media consumption such as watching movies).There may not be as vast a difference between old and young generations as we once thought, and students certainly continue to need teachers to guide them in using tech in a relevant way.
  • Available IT resources and support
    Wireless internet access and capacity on campus
    How apps will be purchased and distributed (for iPads)
  • ASSURE starts with looking at the learner in detail. Define your audience. Understand their general characteristics Nothing you plan or design is effective unless you have taken the time to look at the learners. Knowing as much as possible about your learners is critical to design and implementation of instruction.

    Second, the second letter in ASSURE, S, refers to knowing the intended outcomes or expectations. No instruction should begin without everyone having a clear understanding of what is supposed to happen in the instruction. Objectives should be stated in terms of what the learner will do.

    The second S refers to selecting your media and materials. In steps 1 and 2, you have defined the beginning point (audience characteristics and skills) and end point (outcomes). Now you have to build an instructional bridge to connect those two points.

    The next step is Using your media and materials. Preview and practice yourself, then roll out the lesson with students.

    Require learner performance. Students need to actively use the tech, practice, and receive feedback.

    The final component is to evaluate and revise. Evaluate the entire process. Gather data on outcomes and impressions from the learners. Did the learners meet the objectives? Were the media and materials effective? Did the learners use the materials properly? Identify discrepancies between what you intended and what actually happened, and make revisions.
  • Integrative – adj. serving or intending to unify separate things.
    Pedagogy – n. the method and practice of teaching, especially as an academic subject or theoretical concept.
  • Pedagogy should drive tech use, not the other way around.

    If you are using tech well, you should leverage it to increase interaction w/ students
  • Content knowledge (CK) is knowledge about the actual subject matter that is to be learned or taught

    Pedagogical knowledge (PK) is deep knowledge about the processes and practices or methods of teaching and learning and how it encompasses, among other things, overall educational purposes, values, and aims.

    Technology knowledge (TK) is knowledge about standard technologies.
  • PCK - knowledge of pedagogy that is applicable to the teaching of specific content. This knowledge includes knowing what teaching approaches fit the content, and likewise, knowing how elements of the content can be arranged for better teaching. This knowledge is different from the knowledge of a disciplinary expert and also from the general pedagogical knowledge shared by teachers across disciplines.

    Technological content knowledge (TCK) is knowledge about the manner in which technology and content are reciprocally related. Although technology constrains the kinds of representations possible, newer technologies often afford newer and more varied representations and greater flexibility in navigating across these representations. Teachers need to know not just the subject matter they teach but also the manner in which the subject matter can be changed by the application of technology.

    Technological pedagogical knowledge (TPK) is knowledge of the existence, components, and capabilities of various technologies as they are used in teaching and learning settings, and conversely, knowing how teaching might change as the result of using particular technologies. This might include an understanding that a range of tools exists for a particular task, the ability to choose a tool based on its fitness, strategies for using the tool’s
    affordances, and knowledge of pedagogical strategies and the ability to apply those strategies for use of technologies.



  • Technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) is an emergent form of knowledge that goes beyond all three components (content, pedagogy, and technology). TPCK is the basis of good teaching with technology and requires an understanding of the representation of concepts using technologies; pedagogical techniques that use technologies in constructive ways to teach content; knowledge of what makes concepts difficult or easy to learn and how technology can help
    redress some of the problems that students face; knowledge of students’ prior knowledge and theories of epistemology; and knowledge of how technologies can be used to build on existing knowledge and to develop new epistemologies or strengthen old ones.




  • The Substitution Augmentation Modification Redefinition Model offers a method of seeing how computer technology might impact teaching and learning.  It also shows a progression that adopters of educational technology often follow as they progress through teaching and learning with technology.   While one might argue over whether an activity can be defined as one level or another, the important concept to grasp here is the level of student engagement. One might well measure progression along these levels by looking at who is asking the important questions.  As one moves along the continuum, computer technology becomes more important in the classroom but at the same time becomes more invisibly woven into the demands of good teaching and learning.
  • Instructivism
    Teacher- and institutionally-centered. Knowledge is created by instructors and institutions and is delivered to students. Teachers and institutions create the processes and conditions for success.

    Constructivism
    Teacher moves into facilitator role, promoting peer-to-peer learning. Students create and construct their own knowledge, building on foundations of previous learning.

    Knowledge is socially constructed
    Knowledge is external to the user and learning is the act of internalizing knowledge
    Learning is a social process
    Meaning is created by the learner

    Connectivism
    Lots of overlap with constructivism. Relationships and networks are a primary source of learning. Focuses on building a network of knowledge sources to access whenever you need them.

    Knowledge rests in diversity of opinions
    Learning is a process of connecting information sources & may reside in non-human devices
    Capacity to know is more critical than what is known
    Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning
    Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill
    Decision-making itself is a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality (meta-cognition).
  • Instructivism
    Teacher- and institutionally-centered. Knowledge is created by instructors and institutions and is delivered to students. Teachers and institutions create the processes and conditions for success.

    Constructivism
    Teacher moves into facilitator role, promoting peer-to-peer learning. Students create and construct their own knowledge, building on foundations of previous learning.

    Knowledge is socially constructed
    Knowledge is external to the user and learning is the act of internalizing knowledge
    Learning is a social process
    Meaning is created by the learner

    Connectivism
    Lots of overlap with constructivism. Relationships and networks are a primary source of learning. Focuses on building a network of knowledge sources to access whenever you need them.

    Knowledge rests in diversity of opinions
    Learning is a process of connecting information sources & may reside in non-human devices
    Capacity to know is more critical than what is known
    Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning
    Ability to see connections between fields, ideas, and concepts is a core skill
    Decision-making itself is a learning process. Choosing what to learn and the meaning of incoming information is seen through the lens of a shifting reality (meta-cognition).
  • Bloom's to guide objectives
  • Pedagogy means the method and practice of teaching, especially as an academic subject or theoretical concept.
  • The Big Picture of Education Technology: The Ped
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