Shooting People Engage101

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My presentation for Shooting People and DCTV on distribution and engaging audiences. A new presentation with some mixed older materials and some very new stuff summarizing how to think about …

My presentation for Shooting People and DCTV on distribution and engaging audiences. A new presentation with some mixed older materials and some very new stuff summarizing how to think about transmedia.

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  • Hey cosmonaut, I wouldn't mention you if you weren't doing great work!
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  • Hey Brian, good work! Very detailed and comprehensive vision of the subject. Thanks for mentioning us by the way :)
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  • Hi Brian: thanks again for a very insightful evening. Since it was all about distribution it can repeat it for a while i think...
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  • I don't know why slideshare always repeats elements of the title, the title the title.....
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  • Today we’ll be talking about distribution and audience building
  • Let’s start by looking at the “old world” model
  • Let’s analyze the old world model where everyone paid. Now I know there are exceptions, and this will simplify things, but for most producers, I think the following will ring true.
  • After finishing your film - you play a film festival, hopefully a famous one
  • Sorry folks, but this was always a myth.
  • Looks like the old/current system is about as good as piracy - which we’ll discuss later. warren buffet said “it’s not until the tide rolls out that you see who is really wearing swimming shorts” and the tide has rolled out and we see the reality of a bad business model so, in dealing with free, we’re also talking about dealing with a business model that’s been stacked against artists, and a window now where maybe we can have success.
  • warren buffet said “it’s not until the tide rolls out that you see who is really wearing swimming shorts” and the tide has rolled out and we see the reality of a bad business model so, in dealing with free, we’re also talking about dealing with a business model that’s been stacked against artists, and a window now where maybe we can have success. this is nothing new, for most of us, we can just communicate better and share info and learn about the changes.
  • and a quick word about traditional distribution - everyone likes to bemoan distributors and middle-men, but they aren’t always ripping you off. In fact, there are some honest ones out there and you can generally check around a get a sense of who is good and bad. Taking a film to market remains an extraordinarily complicated game, and it’s expensive to do it right and they aren’t in business to further your career, but to make money. (well, good ones like you to have a career, but you get the point). They are also facing a very crowded marketplace and the simple reality that while everyone in this room thinks you are making a great film, most of you are making crap. Or at best, films that aren’t ready for the marketplace. So this isn’t a bash the distributor panel, but rather a - given the fact that you won’t likely get a distributor, and if you do, current realities mean that the MG will be low (if anything) - what are your other options panel.
  • Explain educational distibution
  • Explain non-theatrical
  • Explain aggregators
  • Explain service deals
  • Explain self-distribution
  • Explain hybrid
  • So what are the rights you can split up? Here’s most of them, as well as some terms you should think about when negotiating. These aren’t everything to think about, use a lawyer, but it’s a start. Explain terms
  • Audience development - Jon Reiss - really not very different than Peter’s model, but his book articulates the following important points
  • Explain Jon Reiss’ book and model
  • Make your own model
  • How do we avoid sudden death? the key is to focus on the audience
  • Mike Masnick of TechDirt has put all of this into a simple formula
  • There’s an old marketing theory that says people don’t go to store to buy a ¼” drill, but because they want a ¼” hole. don’t go to the store to buy a hammer. They go there because they want to hang a picture, to get something done, and the hammer just helps them do it.
  • I love seeing a movie in a theater, but let’s face it – that was a tool for Hollywood to pack as many people into one space and make money off their desire to escape. It was a tool to have a fun night out, but it was only one tool.
  • We now have new tools, and we can’t fight it, but need to embrace them to our benefit. The audience wants to build something – they can get your hammer for free, or you can give them a reason to buy it. They also want to interact with you in new ways, so use these tools to your advantage. People can collect around your film, watch it and interact with it in new ways now. And we have new ways of reaching them and engaging them. To do this, however, you have to understand internet culture, so let’s take a quick tour of relevant trends with examples.
  • First, this is all becoming more participatory, a conversation
  • And your website should make it easy for people to take the content to other websites and blogs through widgets, etc. Notice how Vanishing of the Bees has a blog, a petition, twitter, facebook, etc. and a widget to take the content elsewhere.
  • You also need one for you, not just your film. It’s how you start building a fan base. Note that Lance also has multiple blogs and sites for himself, his company and his film. He also let’s people subscribe, so he can always contact them, and he includes his twitter feed at the top. Now you may think this is a waste, but millions have started using it, and it can build your audience, so start using it now.
  • Importance of twitter (today) Fastest growing 1382% increase in one year, 42% over 35. oprah just joined it on April 16, meaning 55 and over will explode
  • Since February – 17 million, thanks Oprah
  • Zoe Keating has used it to amass an audience of over 1 million followers, and she now has a self-sustaining career. Notice here she is replying/thanking a fan who cued her in on how to watch some media. She’s not just working a one way street, she’s communicating with her audience.
  • Because this is all becoming more participatory, a conversation
  • old fashioned, real world conversation
  • or enabled by online age of stupid has taken it to another, easier, level
  • Facebook and changes in growth
  • Social networking sites and importance to building community Here’s just 7 of the social networks I use regularly –The Filmmakers Workshop one is created on Ning – where anyone can create a social network, and over 1 million have
  • But of course, there are many more. Thousands more, and growing. While any one social network may disappear, the social networked environment is here to stay. And this doesn’t even touch on second life…you need to find the social networks your core audience uses and connect to them there. People are using this tool to connect and have conversation. They are building a community, and perhaps you can use it to build a network of fans
  • Ning for building own network, or just build it on Facebook
  • Because this should be your ultimate goal - not to think of building an audience for just one film, but for you, your career - people who will continue to follow you, be in dialogue with you and support your career.
  • Here’s Meet-up, for example. Doc films in NYC there are at least 27 groups near here. Some have hundreds of members. So, how can we use Meetup.com? Perhaps, simply, by building your fans, not members necessarily, just fans as a meetup group. There can be a meetup group for your film. But more importantly is not to just use meetup, but to think of how this tool can work for what you want to accomplish. Let’s look at some success stories
  • Filmmakers are doing it on their own. Here’s 4 Eyed Monsters, and we can see they are using blogs, comments, fan contributed info google maps and even old fashioned phones to push their films. Four Eyed Monsters Story – got into Slamdance, no distributors bought the film Self-distributing and building word of mouth online and through podcasts www.foureyedmonsters.com Combining a bit of everything – my space, youtube, google maps, audio, podcasts they teach people to help them market their film – building their community Tshirts, widgets, etc Note that they come to you – you don’t have to go to the theater, you can go directly to them Use the power of friends and fans to promote your film
  • Using google maps to crowdsource screenings - crowdsourced their audience. Now, people can crowdsource their financing as well
  • and now you can too with crowdcontrols
  • Patronage – radiohead model, give it away but can donate to get more. Jill Sobule got her fans to donate to make her album - 95K
  • Here’s a blow-up of what you got for your donation
  • lest you think just one person is doing this - Josh freese – session musician and drummer
  • Limited, authentic and is a real experience. The super-fan or patron is much more engaged
  • Here’s Indiegogo Not the best or only such site, but using these same ideas to help people build audiences and funders for their films
  • Here’s the age of stupid; Franny Armstrong designed “crowd-funding” strategy that has raised over $1 million dollars--£590,000 for the production and distribution of her new feature THE AGE OF STUPID and £164,321 for the Not Stupid social action campaign . 228 people who gave over $2500 could get money back by making loans that don’t have to be repaid, small contributors got anything from feeling good to credits in the film Thanks to Peter Broderick for turning me on to this story
  • So they built a fan base that raised their funds, and they’re having a green premiere and then screening on 64 screens in London via satellite – to an audience likely that is already fans
  • One of the people behind Four Eyed Monsters has now launched OpenIndie - a project that is being crowd-funded on Kickstarter that will help filmmakers band together to share data and crowd-source audiences across multiple films. Note here that they are also relying on micro-donations, something else that’s popular and easy online
  • Creative commons is using its community to build donors to their organization, and has done something novel – timed monthly small contributions from credit cards – you can do the same
  • cosmonaut example
  • cosmonaut example
  • The internet has also allowed for a relatively new phenomenon - it’s not just about participating through blogs, social networks, etc. People are also sharing the actual media
  • Here’s one of the most popular videos from YouTube. A relatively amateur dancer that lasts about 6 minutes. 127 million views, but there are multiple versions, each downloaded over 100,000 times. And this doesn’t count how it has been virally spread and shared. 600K people have rated it, and 240K commented on this one posting. Thousands have posted video responses as well. Let’s put this in perspective.
  • Spiderman 3, most popular of 2007 – 56 million. Pirates of Carrib 2006 – 50 million, Batman – currently about 83 Million Vs 100 million plus of the YouTube dancing video. If we look at the lowest rated of the top 100 videos on YouTube, it had been seen about the same amount of times as most hollywood films in a week
  • Even with DVD sales, more people will probably see the crazy dancer than this film. – and they shared it with their friends, talked about it, uploaded spoofs and participated with it. Something’s going on here – participatory, contributory culture It is cultural democratization – people are not just passive consumers anymore It is also bottom up It’s also launched a new era of people expecting to see things, when where and how they want it
  • The audience can participate – via video comments, live video chats from their parties, talking on the phone, sharing favorite music, downloading stickers They also make it available in every format
  • Here’s a recent mash-up of their video responses – they’ve built so many true fans that this video has been seen over 200K times, thousands of fans have added more footage and the phenomenon continues years after their screenings.
  • As mentioned earlier, people expect their content on multiple platforms, they want to see it when, where and how they want to see it and they wanted it yesterday
  • They want it when they want it, from whatever portal they like and on whatever device they like, and they want it yesterday They want to share it virally with their friends
  • and they want to time shift their watching to their convenience
  • and get it on mobile- one of the biggest trends recently and in coming years, which I’m not devoting enough time to today.
  • and they may even still buy the film on a DVD or other method - but they want access to all of these platforms. Here’s one filmmaker who is using that to his advantage - Cory McAbee with Stingray Sam - offering easy ways to get it in multiple formats and with value added.
  • They’ll pay for limited editions, from the artist, with cool add-ons
  • and they want it free, whether with ad support or through piracy
  • Patronage – “Steal this Film” donation model
  • Now has morphed into Vodo, to launch soon
  • Immediacy – get it now, early Personalized – to your rating Interpretation – free code, manual 10K – or gene understanding Authenticity – from the Dead Accessibility – someone else stores it for use anywhere – gmail Embodiment – Book is free, lecture with author costs Patronage – support the artist, radiohead Findability – finding it in the sea
  • and that’s the key to cross-media in this environment. It let’s the audience get involved across not just multiple platforms in terms of screens, but in terms of story access points. That’s why the point of this conference is cross-media
  • Cross media allows them to become active participants in multiple parts of the story. It allows them to delve deeper into the experience if they so choose, or access it from their preferred medium. The idea is to expand the story line into multiple media. It doesn’t have to be just games, ARG, graphic novels, etc it can be the rock concert in the film as a separate disc, or the mobile extension, for example
  • Definitions of transmedia and examples/things to think about
  • More to think about and experts.
  • Thomas Allen Harris and Through a Lens Darkly
  • Occupation Dreamland realized that their film wasn’t just about the Iraq war, but about recruitment. They found a scene where soldiers in the war are being asked to re-enlist, and one speaks up and says to the recruiter that he lied to him before and said he wouldn’t see action, wouldn’t see his friends die and he did. He calls him a liar. It’s powerful, so they made that clip available as a downloadable cell clip and gave it to anti-war activists on campuses, who could go up to recruiting stations and show it to potential recruits, to expose the lies. The point is, cross-media isn’t just flashy games, but engagement and impact.
  • Definitions of transmedia and examples/things to think about
  • Summary of use of new tools and how the next level will be thinking about how these tools can completely change storytelling experience.
  • My deets

Transcript

  • 1. Engage 101: Audience Building & Distribution & Distribution & Distribution
  • 2. Distribution 101
  • 3. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model
  • 4. Old World $
  • 5. Old World $
    • Play festival
  • 6. Old World $
    • Play festival
    • Sell to distributor/broadcaster (s)
  • 7. Old World $
    • Play festival
    • Sell to distributor/broadcaster (s)
    • Advance
    • Percentage of revenues
  • 8. Old World $
    • Play festival
    • Sell to distributor/broadcaster (s)
    • Advance
    • Percentage of revenues
    • They sell to audience
  • 9. Old World $
    • Play festival
    • Sell to distributor/broadcaster (s)
    • Advance
    • Percentage of revenues
    • They sell to audience
    • Who pays for the film
  • 10. Old World $
    • Play festival
    • Sell to distributor/broadcaster
    • Advance
    • Percentage of revenues
    • They sell to audience
    • Who pays for the film
    • $ to distributor
    • $ to filmmakers
    • $ to investors
  • 11. Old World $
    • Play festival
    • Sell to distributor/broadcaster
    • Advance
    • Percentage of revenues
    • They sell to audience
    • Who pays for the film
    • $ to distributor
    • $ to filmmakers
    • $ to investors
    • Everyone is happy....
  • 12. Old World $ MYTH
    • Play festival
    • Sell to distributor/broadcaster
    • Advance
    • Percentage of revenues
    • They sell to audience
    • Who pays for the film
    • $ to distributor
    • $ to filmmakers
    • $ to investors
    • Everyone is happy....
  • 13. Old World $ Play festival Maybe
  • 14. Old World $ Play festival Maybe Sell to distributor/broadcaster(s) Maybe – forever, everywhere
  • 15. Old World $ Play festival Maybe Sell to distributor/broadcaster(s) Maybe – forever, everywhere Advance $0 - $15,000 avg Percentage of revenues 30% - 60% after expenses
  • 16. Old World $ Play festival Maybe Sell to distributor/broadcaster(s) Maybe – forever, everywhere Advance $0 - $15,000 avg Percentage of revenues 30% - 60% after expenses They sell to audience Hopefully
  • 17. Old World $ Play festival Maybe Sell to distributor/broadcaster(s) Maybe – forever, everywhere Advance $0 - $15,000 avg Percentage of revenues 30% - 60% after expenses They sell to audience Hopefully Who pays for the film If theaters book it or buyers buy
  • 18. Old World $ Play festival Maybe Sell to distributor/broadcaster(s) Maybe – forever, everywhere Advance $0 - $15,000 avg Percentage of revenues 30% - 60% after expenses They sell to audience Hopefully Who pays for the film If theaters book it or buyers buy $ to distributor But, marketing, P&A, staffing, cross-collateralization, fees, delivery
  • 19. Old World $ Play festival Maybe Sell to distributor/broadcaster(s) Maybe – forever, everywhere Advance $0 - $15,000 avg Percentage of revenues 30% - 60% after expenses They sell to audience Hopefully Who pays for the film If theaters book it or buyers buy $ to distributor But, marketing, P&A, staffing, cross-collateralization, fees, delivery $0 to filmakers $0 to investors No one is happy...and you don’t even own your film anymore
  • 20. $
  • 21. Not New
  • 22. Distributors aren’t (usually) ripping you off.
  • 23. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model
  • 24. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model
  • 25. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model
  • 26. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model Aggregators IndieFlix model
  • 27. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model Aggregators IndieFlix model Service Deal Passion of Christ model
  • 28. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model Aggregators IndieFlix model Service Deal Passion of Christ model Self Distribution Four-Eyed Monsters model
  • 29. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model Aggregators IndieFlix model Service Deal Passion of Christ model Self Distribution Four-Eyed Monsters model Hybrid Distribution Peter Broderick “New World” model
  • 30. New World/Hybrid $
  • 31. New World/Hybrid $ You own rights Split rights Partner for exploitation You keep more $
  • 32. New World/Hybrid $ You own rights Split rights Partner for exploitation You keep more $ ......(in theory)
  • 33. Rights & Terms Theatrical Non-theatrical Educational Ancillary Home Video Broadcast Online VOD (rental), EST (purchase) Piracy/Peer to Peer Foreign Mobile Event/alternatives MG Minimum Guarantee/Advance Exclusivity/Non Term Territories/markets Cross-collateralization Marketing/ P&A Commitments Windows Day and Date
  • 34. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model Aggregators IndieFlix model Service Deal Passion of Christ model Self Distribution Four-Eyed Monsters model Hybrid Distribution Peter Broderick “New World” model
  • 35. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model Aggregators IndieFlix model Service Deal Passion of Christ model Self Distribution Four-Eyed Monsters model Hybrid Distribution Peter Broderick “New World” model Audience Development Jon Reiss model
  • 36. Audience Development From Jon Reiss: Think Outside the Box Office Your film Your needs New Rights Scheme: Your audience Live event/Theatrical Your resources Merchandise Create a strategy Digital Build your team Start before finished - the new 50/50 Build core audience Social Media Transmedia
  • 37. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model Aggregators IndieFlix model Service Deal Passion of Christ model Self Distribution Four-Eyed Monsters model Hybrid Distribution Peter Broderick “New World” model Audience Development Jon Reiss model
  • 38. Distribution 101 Traditional Distribution “ Old World” model Educational Distribution New Day Films model Non-theatrical Distribution Working Films model Aggregators IndieFlix model Service Deal Passion of Christ model Self Distribution Four-Eyed Monsters model Hybrid Distribution Peter Broderick “New World” model Audience Development Jon Reiss model Make Your Own Model - evaluate your Plan A vs. other Plan B (s)
  • 39. Photo Credit: FFFFound
  • 40. CwF + RtB = $$$ Mike Masnick, TechDirt
  • 41. CwF + RtB = $$$ Mike Masnick, TechDirt Connect with fans, give them a reason to buy, and make money.
  • 42. How?
  • 43.  
  • 44.  
  • 45.  
  • 46. Participatory Culture
    • A Conversation
  • 47. Langworthy & Henein Vanishing of the Bees
  • 48.  
  • 49. Usage by Age Group US and Int’l Growth Twitter
  • 50. US and Int’l Growth thanks to Oprah Source: ComScore
  • 51. Zoe Keating @ZoeCello 1.13 million followers on Twitter
  • 52. Participatory Culture
    • A real, authentic conversation
  • 53.  
  • 54.  
  • 55.  
  • 56.  
  • 57.  
  • 58.  
  • 59. Building Community
    • Friends & Fans
  • 60. www.meetup.com
  • 61. www.foureyedmonsters.com
  • 62. www.foureyedmonsters.com
  • 63. crowdcontrols.cc
  • 64. CrowdSourcing
    • Turning Community into Funders
  • 65.  
  • 66.
    • $10 - Unpolished Rock (but with potential) Level: A free digital download of the album, when it's released.
    • $25 - Polished Rock Level : An advance copy of the CD. Weeks before the masses.
    • $2,500 - Emerald Level : Mentioned as an executive producer of the album -- whoop-di-doo!
    • $ 5,000 - Diamond Level : I will come and do a house concert for you. Invite your friends, serve some drinks, bring me out and I sing. Actually, this level is a smart choice economically. I've played many house concerts where the host has charged his guests and made his money back. I'd go for this if I were you.
    • $10,000 - Weapons-Grade Plutonium Level: You get to come and sing on my CD. Don't worry if you can't sing - we can fix that on our end. Also, you can always play the cowbell.
    Details from Jill’s Next Record website
  • 67.  
  • 68.
    • $500 (limited edition of 15) -- 5 Sold! Only 10 left!
    • Signed CD/DVD and digital download
    • T-shirt
    • Signed Cymbal and sticks
    • Meet me in Venice, CA and we go floating in a Sensory
    • Deprivation Tank (filmed and posted on youtube).
    • *Dinner at Sizzler (get your $8.99 Steak and "all you can eat"
    • Shrimp on)
    Details from Josh Freese website
  • 69. www.indiegogo.com
  • 70.  
  • 71.  
  • 72. www.kickstarter.com
  • 73.  
  • 74.  
  • 75.  
  • 76. Participatory II.
    • A Viral Video Conversation
  • 77.  
  • 78.  
  • 79.  
  • 80.  
  • 81.  
  • 82. Multi-Platform
    • Agnostic and Viral
  • 83.  
  • 84.  
  • 85. Sally Potter’s Rage
  • 86. McAbee: Stingray Sam
  • 87.  
  • 88. Free
    • (Plus Fee)
  • 89.  
  • 90.  
  • 91. Generatives
    • Immediacy
      • Give them something now
    • Personalization
      • To their needs
    • Interpretation
      • With study guide, or commentary
    • Authenticity
      • From you directly, signed by you
    • Embodiment
    • Speaking fees
    • Patronage
    • Support the artist; Radiohead model
    • Accessibility
    • Make it easy to get; convenient
    • Findability
    • Work with partners who make you findable
    From Kevin Kelly’s: Better Than Free
  • 92. Cross-Platform
    • Cross-Media, Transmedia
  • 93.  
  • 94. Transmedia Develop the story across multiple entry points Multi-platform Types/examples: Deep audience engagement Events Target for amenable audiences Games/ARG Audience can become immersed in experience Interactive components Each element a distinctive experience Graphic Novels Story flows & builds rev streams Online & viral content Should start before the film is done (dev best) Think Outside the norms - experiences Encourages participatory audiences May need a team
  • 95. Transmedia Keep a mind towards audience dev. components from the beginning Some Experts: Think beyond marketing Christy Dena It’s not all about the film - extend the experience Stephen Dinehart (coined) Think about impact & social change Jeff Gomez Not just games.... events, gallery shows, etc. Henry Jenkins Some projects may not need to be a film Mike Monello ...or can become one if successful John Threat Transmedia can be simple Lance Weiler Many more
  • 96. Thomas Allen Harris: Through a Lens Darkly
  • 97. Olds & Scott: Occupation Dreamland
  • 98. Quick Summary Identify Core audience & build fan base Use social media & new tools Engage in the conversation - make it participatory and real Start early Build your Plan A CWF + RtB Engage audience - transmedia
  • 99.  
  • 100. Blog: www.springboardmedia.blogspot.com Email: bnewman001@gmail.com Twitter: @bnewman01