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Basic Photography Twist those dials with a purpose!
It’s all about the light <ul><li>“Photography” means “painting with light”. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s all about capturing the...
Exposure <ul><li>There are three factors that work together to get the right exposure: </li></ul>Camera Lens Film (*) (*) ...
Camera <ul><li>When taking a picture, the camera exposes the film briefly by opening the shutter.  </li></ul><ul><li>You c...
Lens <ul><li>The lens has an iris you can adjust to influence the amount of light that enters the camera. </li></ul><ul><l...
Film <ul><li>There are a lot of different films out there. </li></ul><ul><li>Not every film has the same sensitivity to li...
Get connected <ul><li>But if these three factors are all influencing your picture at the same time… </li></ul>Shutter spee...
Stop! <ul><li>Shutter speed, aperture and ISO are all connected through their Exposure Value, also called  stops . </li></...
Getting the light right <ul><li>Your basic settings are dictated by the amount of light available in the scene you wish to...
Touch those dials <ul><li>To show you how shutter speed, aperture and ISO are connected, we’ll take an example setting fro...
Touch those dials 2 Remember these settings are connected. So if one element goes up a stop, another has to go down to get...
Why bother? <ul><li>All three elements (speed, aperture and ISO) influence specific elements of your picture.  </li></ul><...
Shutter speed <ul><li>The higher your shutter speed, the less motion blur you will have from moving objects in your scene....
Aperture The higher your aperture ( remember: the smaller the number ), the less depth of field you will have in your pict...
ISO value The higher your ISO value, the more grain ( film ) or noise ( digital ) you will have in your picture.  25600 64...
That’s it! <ul><li>This is the most fundamental thing there is to know about photography.  </li></ul><ul><li>From here on,...
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Basic Photography 101

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A basic course in the fundamentals of photography: Aperture, exposure and shutter speed, and how you can get them to work together to deliver the result you want. Thanks to Flickr and Penmachine.com for their good picture examples.

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  • Great Ppt. presentation a primer for zero knowledge of Photography.. can pls. you pls. send me a copy, here's my email accnt. blurein@live.co.uk
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  • nice presentation! could you pls email this to me. please. this is my account: sean_anthony09@yahoo.com OR seanthony09@gmail.com
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  • so if I have 400 ISO film and I am in dowtown dallas in the middle of the day and middle of the summer what would I want to set my shutter and aperture too? and vice versa?
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Transcript of "Basic Photography 101"

  1. 1. Basic Photography Twist those dials with a purpose!
  2. 2. It’s all about the light <ul><li>“Photography” means “painting with light”. </li></ul><ul><li>It’s all about capturing the right amount of light on film or digital sensor. </li></ul><ul><li>The concept of the film in your camera being exposed to light is called “exposure”. </li></ul><ul><li>Yes, it’s that obvious  </li></ul>
  3. 3. Exposure <ul><li>There are three factors that work together to get the right exposure: </li></ul>Camera Lens Film (*) (*) This goes for a digital camera as well. Hang on, I’ll get to that in a bit.
  4. 4. Camera <ul><li>When taking a picture, the camera exposes the film briefly by opening the shutter. </li></ul><ul><li>You can determine the amount of time the shutter is opened. </li></ul><ul><li>This is called shutter speed . </li></ul><ul><li>The shutter speed is measured in fractions of a second (i.e.: 1/125 second). </li></ul>shutter
  5. 5. Lens <ul><li>The lens has an iris you can adjust to influence the amount of light that enters the camera. </li></ul><ul><li>The amount with which the iris is opened or closed is called the aperture . </li></ul><ul><li>The aperture is measure in a f-number. </li></ul><ul><li>The higher the f-number, the smaller the iris (example: picture top right). </li></ul><ul><li>Confusingly, a ‘large aperture’ means a large opening, but is expressed in a small f-number. The middle right picture, for example, is a large aperture at f/1.8 </li></ul>
  6. 6. Film <ul><li>There are a lot of different films out there. </li></ul><ul><li>Not every film has the same sensitivity to light. </li></ul><ul><li>The actual sensitivity of any given film is measured in its ISO (or sometimes ASA) value. </li></ul><ul><li>The higher the value, the more sensitive the film. </li></ul><ul><li>Your digital camera lacks film, of course. But you can actually adjust the ISO value through the settings. This way you can adjust its sensitivity to light in the same way you would by loading a new roll of film! </li></ul>
  7. 7. Get connected <ul><li>But if these three factors are all influencing your picture at the same time… </li></ul>Shutter speed Aperture ISO … how do you get them to work together?
  8. 8. Stop! <ul><li>Shutter speed, aperture and ISO are all connected through their Exposure Value, also called stops . </li></ul><ul><li>The most common stops are charted in the table below. </li></ul><ul><li>These values are standardized and found on any lens, film or camera from any manufacturer. </li></ul>1/2000 1/1000 22 1/500 50 100 200 400 800 1600 3200 ISO (ASA scale) 16 11 8 5.6 4 2.8 2 1.4 1 Aperture (Measured in f/x) 1/250 1/125 1/60 1/30 1/15 1/8 1/4 ½ 1 Shutter speed (measured in seconds)
  9. 9. Getting the light right <ul><li>Your basic settings are dictated by the amount of light available in the scene you wish to photograph. </li></ul>Shutter: 1/125 Aperture: f 5.6 ISO: 200 Shutter: 1/200 Aperture: f 4 ISO: 200 Shutter: 8 Aperture: f 5.6 ISO: 200 Shutter: 1/2000 Aperture: f 4 ISO: 400
  10. 10. Touch those dials <ul><li>To show you how shutter speed, aperture and ISO are connected, we’ll take an example setting from below. </li></ul>Shutter: 1/125 Aperture: f 5.6 ISO: 200 Shutter: 1/250 Aperture: f 4 ISO: 200 Shutter: 8 Aperture: f 5.6 ISO: 200 Shutter: 1/2000 Aperture: f 4 ISO: 400
  11. 11. Touch those dials 2 Remember these settings are connected. So if one element goes up a stop, another has to go down to get a correct exposure. So if this picture is correctly exposed at 1/250, f/4, 200 ASA then the picture is also correctly exposed at 1/500, f/5.6, 800 ASA and 1/1000, f/1.4, 100 ASA, etc, etc. These example settings are charted out in the Exposure Values table to illustrate the concept: You can change any setting, as long as you adjust at least one other setting to compensate. 1/2000 1/1000 22 1/500 50 100 200 400 800 1600 3200 ISO (ASA scale) 16 11 8 5.6 4 2.8 2 1.4 1 Aperture (Measured in f/x) 1/250 1/125 1/60 1/30 1/15 1/8 1/4 ½ 1 Shutter speed (measured in seconds)
  12. 12. Why bother? <ul><li>All three elements (speed, aperture and ISO) influence specific elements of your picture. </li></ul><ul><li>So while the scene in the previous example will be correctly photographed with any of the mentioned settings, the resulting pictures will be different from each other. </li></ul><ul><li>This is where you can get creative and get the picture you’re looking for. </li></ul><ul><li>So let’s see what changes with each setting… </li></ul>
  13. 13. Shutter speed <ul><li>The higher your shutter speed, the less motion blur you will have from moving objects in your scene. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Aperture The higher your aperture ( remember: the smaller the number ), the less depth of field you will have in your picture and the faster everything in front and behind your point of focus will turn blurry and out of focus. f/1.8 f/5.6 f/14
  15. 15. ISO value The higher your ISO value, the more grain ( film ) or noise ( digital ) you will have in your picture. 25600 6400 200
  16. 16. That’s it! <ul><li>This is the most fundamental thing there is to know about photography. </li></ul><ul><li>From here on, it gets to be real fun. Different lenses, adjusting composition, different lighting conditions... </li></ul><ul><li>Have fun, experiment and share! </li></ul>

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