Supelec m2m - iot - update 2013 - part 2

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UPDATE 2013 - SUPELEC, Machine to Machine (M2M) & Internet of Things (IoT), Part 2/3

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Supelec m2m - iot - update 2013 - part 2

  1. 1. FromMachine-to-Machine (M2M) Communications to Internet of Things (IoT) Introduction to M2M/IoT Market Technology Roadmap & Standards Part 2/3 Thierry Lestable (MS’97, Ph.D’03) Technology & Innovation Manager, Sagemcom
  2. 2. Disclaimer • Besides Sagemcom SAS’, many 3rd party copyrighted material is reused within this brief tutorial under the ‘fair use’ approach, for sake of educational purpose only, and very limited edition. • As a consequence, the current slide set presentation usage is restricted, and is falling under usual copyright usage. • Thanks for your understanding! 2© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  3. 3. ToC – Part 1 • Market • Internet of Things (IoT) – RFID/QR codes/Augmented Reality/NFC – Governance rules • Architecture • Capillary Networks & Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) – KNX/ISA-100/W-HART/Bluetooth/Zigbee/ANT+/WiFi 11ac/ad/Direct – IPSO/6LoWPAN/ROLL • Smart Home – Z-wave/Wavenis – DLNA/UPnP – Management (BBF) • WAN - LTE 3© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  4. 4. ToC- Part 2 • WiFi/Cellular Convergence • WiMAX – M2M • Smart Grids – Use cases/Features/Overview – SGCG/M490 – SMCG/M441 – G3 PLC/PRIME – Governance • Smart Vehicles (ITS) – DSRC/WAVE/802.11p – EC Mandate/ETSI/ITS-G5 – Use cases/Features • Cloud – Gaming – TV Connected • Smart TVs • Thin Clients/Stream boxes • PVR • Standardization & industry Alliances Part 3 (Final slot) • Net neutrality • Conclusions & Perspectives – French Market – Worldwide Forecast 4© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  5. 5. Summary of Part 1
  6. 6. IoT – Commuting Time ATAWADAC = Any Time Any Where Any Device Any Content 6© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  7. 7. Smart City What we are looking for….ultimately… Whilst avoiding ‘Big Brother’ & maintaining ‘Privacy’… 7© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  8. 8. Traffic Explosion & Social Networks / OTT 50% 901 million 500 Million Mobile users
  9. 9. Mobile traffic forecasts 2010-2020: Worlwide Total mobile traffic •As a conclusion, total worldwide mobile traffic will reach more than 127 EB in 2020, representing an 33 times increase compared with 2010 figure. Total mobile traffic (EB per year) 140.00 120.00 100.00 Yearly traffic in EB Europe 80.00 Americas Asia 60.00 Rest of the world W orld 40.00 20.00 - 2010 2015 2020 Source: IDATE 9© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  10. 10. Wireless M2M: 4 pillars 10© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  11. 11. RFID Communication platform 11© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  12. 12. Id Tag B2C scenario example 12© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  13. 13. NFC: 3 operating modes Universal Mobile Wallet 13© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  14. 14. IoT – European Vision 2020 14© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  15. 15. IoT, European Commission • Need for Governance Actions – Privacy & protection of personnal Data – Trust, Acceptance & Security – Standardization Internet of Things Internet of Things for People 15© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  16. 16. High Level (simplified) M2M Architecture Capillary Network Operator platform M2M Gateway Client Application 16© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  17. 17. Capillary Network &Wireless Sensors Network (WSN) Key Technologies From proprietary solutions towards IP smart objects…
  18. 18. Smart Digital Home 18© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  19. 19. Home Network Convergence Video Access Environme eHealth Security Femtocell Screen Set Top Box HGW Meter Control nt Appliance Sensor Sensor BROADBAND HOME NETWORK SENSOR NETWORK Quadruple Play Energy Managt, Home Control, eHealth QoS / Plug and Play / Easy install / Security Portable Applications OSGI TR69 TR69 / SNMP DLNA UPnP IP V6 IP V4 / V6 6LoWPAN / ZigBee Ethernet, WiFi, Home Plug , USB, G.Hn ZigBee, CPL, MBUS, X10 DECT, FXS, 3G/4G 19© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  20. 20. WAN – Cellular Systems 3GPP LTE & WiMAX
  21. 21. Vertical Markets in LTE 21© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  22. 22. Wireless Broadband Systems mapping 22© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  23. 23. Global Mobile Traffic Exabytes (1018) per Month 10.8 EB 6.9 EB 4.2 EB 2.4 EB 1.3 EB 70% 0.6 EB 10.8 EB 6.9 EB 4.2 EB 2.4 EB 1.3 EB0.6 EB 23© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  24. 24. LTE subscribers Forecast (thousands) Worldwide By 2015, Around 379 Million LTE subscribers #1 24© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  25. 25. LTE Ecosystem is maturing fast!Smart Phones M-Tablets DSL-Routers + USB Dongles + Netbooks, etc… 25© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  26. 26. LTE Devices Form Factor - 2011 Oct. 2011 26© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  27. 27. LTE Devices Form Factor - 2012 November 2012 X3 increase in LTE devices in 1 year ! Manufacturers grew +73% during same period! 151 LTE Smart Phones: X 5 in 1 year! LTE-enabled Tablets: more than doubled in 6 Months ! 1800MHz band Most popular now! Used in +37% networks deployed. 27© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  28. 28. LTE Devices categories @1800MHz130 LTE User Devices @1800MHz Router USB Dongle Phone Module 42 networks deployed @1800MHz, 22 more on-going Roll-outs Ecosystem is mature enough to provide such profile
  29. 29. LTE Parallel evolution path to 3G DL: 21Mbps (64QAM) DL: 28Mbps [2x2 MIMO & 16QAM] DC-HSPA + 64QAM 2x2 MIMO & 64QAM 29© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  30. 30. Main benefits from LTE 30© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  31. 31. Main benefits from LTE • Full Packet Switched (PS) no MSC • CSFB, SRVCC • no RNC • Hotspot Offload • Self-Organizing Networks (SON) • DL: 150Mbps / UL: 50Mbps (2x2 MIMO) • Mobility up to 350Km/h • BW up to 20MHz • Latency < 5ms • Default Bearer & QoS • QoS & IMS | ICIC • BW: 1.4, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20MHz • GSMA (VoLTE), LSTI, NGMN, GCF, Femto Forum • new Bands: 2.6GHz, 700/800 MHz (Digital Dividend) 31© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  32. 32. LTE Rel.8/9: Bandwidth & Duplexing modes And HALF-DUPLEX!!! 32© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  33. 33. 105 Networks launched in 48 Countries 209 by end of 2013! 27,6 Million Subscribers
  34. 34. Worldwide Mobile Broadband Spectrum FDD: 2x70MHz FDD: 2x35MHz TDD: 50MHz FDD Hong-Kong 7 3 China Mobile 2600 1800AWS TeliaSonera Genius Brand Vodafone CSL Ltd O2 … Major TD-LTE Market … (incl. India) VerizonmetroPCS AT&T 21 NTT DoCoMo 1500 Refarming and Extensions are still to come… Digital Dividend Fragmentation & Harmonization of Spectrum is a critical problem! 34© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  35. 35. LTE Roll-out Worldwide Vs Spectrum Band fragmentation Source:Huawei 35© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  36. 36. TD-LTE is gaining momentum Strong Ecosystem growing fast… TD-LTE is becoming a Technology of Highest interest for Operators & Vendors 36© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  37. 37. Global UMTS Subscriber Growth Forecast HSPA+ will still play an active role In near future, both as migration and complementary to LTE. 3G will keep playing a Key role In Future! Multi-Radio chips (2G/3G/LTE) 37© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  38. 38. 3GPP LTE System architecture IMS: IP Multimedia Subsystem PCRF: Policy, Charging Resource Function UE: User Equipment MME: Mobility Management Entity S-GW: Serving Gateway P-GW: Packet Gateway HSS: Home Subcriber Server EPC: Evolved Packet Core EPS: Evolved Packet System = EPC + E-UTRAN E-UTRAN: Evolved UTRAN PMIP: Proxy Mobile IP DHCP LTE – Rel.8 38© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  39. 39. LTE Bearers E-UTRAN EPC InternetUE eNB S-GW P-GW Peer Entity End-to-end Service EPS Bearer External Bearer E-RAB S5/S8 Bearer Radio Bearer S1 Bearer Radio S1 S5/S8 Gi
  40. 40. QoS parameters & QoS Class Id (QCI) QCI Resource Priority Packet Packet Example Services Type Delay Error Loss Budget Rate (NOTE 1) (NOTE 2) 1 2 100 ms -2 Conversational Voice 10 (NOTE 3) 2 4 150 ms -3 Conversational Video (Live Streaming) 10 (NOTE 3) GBR 3 3 50 ms 10 -3 Real Time Gaming VoLTE (NOTE 3) 4 5 300 ms 10 -6 Non-Conversational Video (Buffered Streaming) (IMS) (NOTE 3) 5 1 100 ms -6 IMS Signalling 10 (NOTE 3) 6 Video (Buffered Streaming) (NOTE 4) 6 300 ms -6 TCP-based (e.g., www, e-mail, chat, ftp, p2p file 10 sharing, progressive video, etc.) 7 Non-GBR Voice, (NOTE 3) 7 100 ms -3 Video (Live Streaming) 10 Interactive Gaming Video 8 (NOTE 5) 8 Video (Buffered Streaming) 300 ms -6 TCP-based (e.g., www, e-mail, chat, ftp, p2p file 10 9 9 sharing, progressive video, etc.) (NOTE 6) Source: 3GPP TS23.303
  41. 41. VoLTE (GSMA IR.92) Timeline Early Adopters General Market craft revolution 2011: TRIALS 2011: CSFB 2012: COMMERCIAL 2012: TRIALS SRVCC 2013: COMMERCIAL « The need for 4G picocells and femtocells to enhance coverage and boost capacity if one of the important principles for Verizon’s LTE Network. » Tony Melone – Verizon Wireless CTO – Sept. 2009 41© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  42. 42. Rich Communications Suite (RCS)contacts File Sharing chat Video share 42
  43. 43. Rich Communications Suite (RCS)43
  44. 44. LTE Speed – TypicalMeasurements (1/2)
  45. 45. LTE Speed – TypicalMeasurements (2/2)
  46. 46. Verizon Wireless – LTECoverage Map (July 2012) ~230 Markets 200 Million POPs NOW! (2/3 coverage) End of 2012: 400 Markets / 260 Million POPs
  47. 47. 4G-LTE Verizon Innovation July 2012 Smart phones Dongles M-TabletsMiFi Verizon JetPack Galaxy Tab 551L Droid - Xyboard
  48. 48. ATT Coverage map (Warning 4G = HSPA+) ~40 Markets 150 Million POPs by end 2012 National coverage by end 2013
  49. 49. AT&T July 2012 Summer 2011USB Dongle ‘Momentum 4G’ MiFi ‘Elevate 4G’
  50. 50. France @2,6GHz @800MHz Authorized to ask for Trials in 2012 Roaming @800MHz to SFR Marseille Lyon Commercial Launch in 2013N.B: deployment @800MHz expected to be slow due to frequency plan from ANFR + potential issues with Digital TV@2.6GHz, still issues with some RADARs
  51. 51. Video Requirements VsDevice types & resolutions
  52. 52. LTE (Rel.8) TerminalCategories: Reminder Most popular/available
  53. 53. Video Requirements – Baseline targets Vs Device types (1/2) Source: Motorola
  54. 54. Video Requirements – Baseline targets Vs Device types (2/2) Source: Santa-Clara Univ.
  55. 55. LTE Video – Number of VideoStreams Per sector (estimate) Source: Motorola Cat.4 Terminal DL: 150Mbps UL: 50Mbps
  56. 56. Dynamic Adaptive Streaming over HTTP (DASH) 3GPP Rel.10 (LTE-Advanced) & Beyond Other HTTP-based Adaptive Streaming solutions Adobe Microsoft HTTP Apple Silverlight Dynamic HTTP Smooth Streaming Live Streaming (HDS) Streaming (MSS) (HLS) 56
  57. 57. Adaptive Streaming Flow 57© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  58. 58. Video Encoder Technology Evolution
  59. 59. Video Coding Standardization - Timeline HEVC (H265) Gain ~ 40% over H264 3GPP Rel.12 (March 2014) Available for Smartphones & Tablets in 2013 (no TV!)
  60. 60. LTE steps intoHeterogeneous Networks HetNets
  61. 61. Network of Networks, Internet of Things (IoT) Presented by Interdigital: Globecom’11 – IWM2M, Houston 61© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  62. 62. How to solve the Capacity crunch? • Capacity crunch is experienced due to following major factors: – Increased data consumption from Smartphone device applications – Signaling traffic overhead genereted by Smartphones • Unoptimized applications too frequent and useless polling – Flat rate service plans – situation can be critical for some operators. – Need for flexible solutions = Sandbox !! HETEROGENEOUS NETWORKS is the solution = HetNets 62© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  63. 63. Residential Macro Data Offload Offload via WiFi and/or Femtocell On average, more than 70% of traffic can still be Offloaded ! 63© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  64. 64. Offload Forecast 64© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  65. 65. HetNets & Small Cells (LTE) 65© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  66. 66. Femtocell ecosystem: 66 Operators (1.99billion subscribers, 34%) 66© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  67. 67. Femtocell ecosystem: 69 Technology Providers The ecosystem is now mature enough 4th IOT Plugfest in February 2012 67© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  68. 68. Femtocell market status 36 Commercial Deployments in 23 countries, 15 Roll-out commitments in 2012 68© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  69. 69. Femtocells Markets Femtocells Competitive Markets Femtocells AP Forecast - 2014 Source: Informa Telecoms & Media 69© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  70. 70. LTE Femto: HeNB S1 S1 S1 S1 S1 S1 X2 X2 3GPP Rel.10 70© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  71. 71. LTE Femtocell: Home eNode B (HeNB) 3 Options! 71© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  72. 72. LTE Femtocell: Home eNode B (HeNB) 3 Options! [1] [2] [3] 72© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  73. 73. HeNB OAM process (Mgt System) 73© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  74. 74. Residential Macro Data Offload Offload via WiFi and/or Femtocell On average, more than 70% of traffic can still be Offloaded ! 74© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  75. 75. Key Findings Global Femtocell Survey • Main driver for femtocells is in-building voice coverage – and is Voice coverage main driver for consumer rating of mobile operator • Voice service improvement alone could prevent 42% of Churn Reduction consumers switching operator in the next 12 months Wi-Fi • 83% of heavy Wi-Fi phone users find femtocells very/extremely complementary appealing Added-value • 68% of femtocell fans found at least one advanced femtocell services service very/extremely appealing 75© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  76. 76. LTE Self-Organizing Networks (SON)
  77. 77. LTE Self-Organizing Network (SON) features S1/X2 configuration 77© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  78. 78. SON progress status w.r.t 3GPP Releases 8, 9, and 10 78© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  79. 79. Support for Self-Configuration & Self-Optimization • Self-Configuration Process – Basic Set-up – Automatic Registration of nodes in the system – Initial Radio Configuration • Self-Optimization Process – Ue & eNB measurements and performance measurements are used to auto-tune the network 79© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  80. 80. LTE-Advanced
  81. 81. LTE-Advanced (Rel.10) and Beyond (Rel.11) Rel.11 81© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  82. 82. LTE-Advanced: System Performance Requirements Support of Wider Bandwidth Carrier Aggregation up to 100MHz MIMO Techniques extension DL: up to 8 layers UL: up to 4 layers Coordinated Multiple Point (CoMP) (Rel.11) Relaying Un Uu L1 & L3 relaying 82© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  83. 83. LTE-AdvancedArchitecture & Services Enhancements • LIPA • SIPTO • IFOM • Relaying • MTC (M2M)
  84. 84. LTE-Advanced: Local IP Access (LIPA) 84© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  85. 85. LIPA solution for HeNB using Local PDN Connection LIPA MME PCRF Rx S10 S11 S1-MME L- GW Gx L-S5 Other IMS HeNB S1-U SGW S5 PDN GW SGi Internet Etc. E- UTRA- Local IP acc ess network elements Uu E-UTRAN network elements EPC network elements Packet data network (e.g. Internet, E-UTRA UE Intranet, intra-operator IMS provisioning) 85© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  86. 86. LTE-Advanced: Selected IP Traffic Offload (SIPTO) SIPTO Traffic CN L-PGW MME RAN S5 S11 S1-U S5 eNB S-GW P-GW UE CN Traffic 86© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  87. 87. LTE-Advanced: IP Flow Mobility and Seamless Offload (IFOM) • IP Flow Mobility and Seamless Offload (IFOM) is used to carry (simultaneously) some of UE’s traffic over WIFI to offload Femto Access! IETF RFC-5555, DSMIPv6 87© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  88. 88. LTE-Advanced: Relaying and its potential gain Un Uu 88© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  89. 89. LTE-Advanced: Relay support MME / S-GW MME / S-GW S1 S1 S1 X2 1 E-UTRAN eNB S1 DeNB X2 Un RN 89© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  90. 90. Machine-Type Communications (MTC) in 3GPP 90© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  91. 91. MTC Scenarios • MTC Device MTC server • MTC Device <--> MTC Device (No Server in between!) MTC MTC API Operator domain Server User MTC Device MTC MTC MTC Operator domain A Operator domain B Device Device Device MTC MTC MTC Device Device Device MTC MTC Device MTC Device Device MTC MTC Device Device Operator domain MTC Server/ MTCMTC UserDevice MTC Device Still Not Considered in Rel.10!! MTC Device MTC Device 91© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  92. 92. 3GPP MTC (High Level) Architecture MTCsms MTC 3GPP Server PLMN - MTCu 3GPP bearer services / MTC MTC Server Device SMS / IMS IWK Function MTC Server MTCi MTCu: It provides MTC Devices access to 3GPP network for the transport of user plane and control plane traffic. MTCu interface could be based on Uu, Um, Ww and LTE-Uu interface. MTCi: It is the reference point that MTC Server uses to connect the 3GPP network and thus communicates with MTC Device via 3GPP bearer services/IMS. MTCi could be based on Gi, Sgi, and Wi interface. MTCsms: It is the reference point MTC Server uses to connect the 3GPP network and thus communicates with MTC Device via 3GPP SMS. 92© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  93. 93. 3GPP MTC: Service Requirements • Common Service REQ • Specific Service REQ (Features) – Device Triggering – Low Mobility – Addressing – Time Controlled – Time Tolerant Private Address Space Public Address Space – PS only MTC MTC – Small data Trx MNO Device Server – Mobile originated only – Infrequent mobile Terminated – Monitoring – Identifiers – Priority alarm – Charging – Secure Connection – Security – Location Specific Trigger – Remote Device Management – NW provided destination for UL data – Infrequent Trx – Group based features 93© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  94. 94. 3GPP MTC: Service REQMTC Common Service REQ DetailsDevice Triggering MTC Device shall be able to receive trigger indications from the network and shall establish communication with the MTC Server when receiving the trigger indication. Possible options may include: -Receiving trigger indication when the MTC Device is offline. -Receiving trigger indication when the MTC Device is online, but has no data connection established. -Receiving trigger indication when the MTC Device is online and has a data connection establishedAddressing MTC Server in a public address space can successfully send a mobile terminated message to the MTC Device inside a private IP address spaceIdentifiers uniquely identify the ME, the MTC subscriber. Manage numbers & identifiers. Unique Group Id.Charging Charging per MTC Device or MTC Group.Security MTC optimizations shall not degrade security compared to non-MTC communicationsRemote MTC Device The management of MTC Devices should be provided by existing mechanisms (e.g. OMA DM, TR-069)Management 94© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  95. 95. 3GPP MTC: Features MTC Feature DetailsLow Mobility MNO change 1) Frequency of Mobility Mgt procedures, or per device, 2) Location updates performed by MTC deviceTime Controlled MTC Applications that can tolerate to send or receive data only during defined time intervals and avoid unnecessary signalling outside these defined time intervals. Different charging can apply.Time Tolerant MTC Devices that can delay their data transfer. The purpose of this functionality is to allow the network operator to prevent MTC Devices that are Time Tolerant from accessing the network (e.g. in case of radio access network overload)Packet Switched (PS) only network operator shall be able to provide PS only subscriptions with or without assigning an MSISDNSmall Data Trx The system shall support transmissions of small amounts of data with minimal network impact (e.g. signalling overhead, network resources, delay for reallocation)Mobile originated only Reduce Frequency of Mobility Management Procedures (Signalling)Infrequent Mobile Terminated MTC Device: mainly mobile originated communications Reduce Mobility Management SignallingMTC Monitoring Detect unexpected behaviour, changes, and loss of connectivity (configurable by user) Warning to MTC server (other actions configurable by user)Priority Alarm Theft, vandalism, tampering Precedence over aby other MTC feature (MAX priority!)Secure Connection Secure connection between MTC Device and MTC server even during Roaming.Location Specific Trigger initiate a trigger to the MTC Devices based on area information provided to the network operatorNetwork Provided Destination MTC Applications that require all data from an MTC Device to be directed to a network provided destination IPfor Uplink Data address.Infrequent Transmission The network shall establish resource only when transmission occursGroup Based (GB) MTC 1 MTC device associated to 1 single MTC group. Combined QoS policy (GB policing): A maximum bit rate forfeatures the data that is sent/received by a MTC Group shall be enforced GB addressing: mechanism to send a broadcast message to a MTC Group, e.g. to wake up the MTC Devices that are members of that MTC Group 95© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  96. 96. M2M European R&D Innovation: FP7 EXALTED • EXpAnding LTE for Devices 96© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  97. 97. NGMN – LTE Backhaul Source: Ericsson Traffic Volume: X2 ~ [ 4 - 10%] S1 IPSec +14% GTP/MIP overhead ~10% LTE Small Cells Deployment will change Rules for Backhaul Provisioning Need for more Research Architecture / PHY / Synchronization (e.g. PTP (1588), SyncE, Hybrid…) 97© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  98. 98. TVWS for Backhaul 98© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  99. 99. LTE in TVWS 99© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  100. 100. LTE Royalty Level: Need for Patent Pool facilitation? LTE/SAE Declarations to ETSI by PO 4076 declarations (March 2011) 14.8% Critical constraint for Femtocells is COST EFFICIENCY!! © 2011 Sisvel (www.sisvel.com) 100© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  101. 101. LTE & 4G patents $12.5 billion 6000+ patents 24000+ patents $4.5 billion WHO’s NEXT?… $2.6 billion $340 Million $770 Million Risk to ‘Kill’ the Business… Especially in Vertical Markets! 101© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  102. 102. Verizon LTE Innovation Center LTE Connected Car Office in the Box Connected Home (incl. eHealth) Bicycle LiveEdge.TV 102© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  103. 103. WiFi – CellularConvergence
  104. 104. Fixed/Mobile Convergence Source: BT Wholesale It’s Mandatory to propose integrated Architectures Taking advantage of Wireless/Wired systems (e.g. 3G, LTE, WiFi, WiGig, DAS, RoF, PLC…) 104© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  105. 105. WBA – Roadmap Small intelligent Cross-Cell (SiXC)™ 105© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  106. 106. Hotspot 2.0 (HS2.0) - NGH Enhancing WiFi to be more ‘Cellular’ Source: Cisco 106© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  107. 107. WiMAX –M2M & Smart Grids IEEE 802.16p, 802.16n
  108. 108. WiMAX community turns to M2M • IEEE 802.16p • IEEE 802.16n – Machine-to-Machine (M2M) (GRIDMAN) – Approved: Sept. 2010 – Smart Grids – Expiration: Dec. 2014 – Emergency, Public Safety!! • Misleading title, stands for: – Greater Reliability In • URL: Disrupted Metroplotian http://ieee802.org/16/m2 Area NW m/index.html – Approved: June 2010 – Expiration: Dec. 2014 • URL: http://wirelessman.org/gri dman/index.html 108© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  109. 109. WiMAX based M2M Architecture Classical WiMAX NW 109© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  110. 110. WiMAX M2M: Requirements & Features • Extremely Low Power Consumption • High Reliability • Enhanced Access Priority – Alarms, Emergency calls etc…(Health, Public safety, Surveillance…) • Extremely Large Numbers of Devices • Addressing • Group Control • Security • Small burst transmission • Low/no mobility • Time Controlled Operation (pre-defined scheduling) • Time Tolerant operations • One-Way Data traffic • Extremely Low Latency (e.g. Emergency..) • Extremely Long Range Access • Infrequent traffic Looks quite similar to 3GPP MTC… 110© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  111. 111. WiMAX M2M: Potential impacts M2M Requirements & Potential Directions with impacts on Standard Features Low Power Consumption Idle/Sleep modes, Power savings in active mode. Link Adaptation, UL Power Ctrl, Ctrl Signalling, Device Cooperation. High Reliability Link Adaptation protocol with very robust MCS. Enhanced Interference Mitigation procedures. Device Collaboration with redundant and/or alternate paths (e.g. diversity) Enhanced Access priority BW request protocol, NW entry/re-entry, ARQ/HARQ, frame structure Transmission attemps Large Link Adaptation, ARQ/HARQ, frame structure, Ctrl signalling, NW entry/re-entry Numbers of Devices Group Control Group ID location, Ctrl signalling, paging, Sleep mode initiation, multi-cast operation, BW request/allocation, connection Mgt protocols Small burst transmission New QoS profiles, burst Mgt, SMS transmission mechanism, BW request/allocation protocols, Channel Coding, frame structure. Low-overhead Ctrl signaling for Small Data. Smaller resource unit! Low/no mobility Mobility Mgt protocol. Signaling w.r.t Handover preparation & execution migt be turned off. Idle mode. Measurements/feedback protocls, pilot structure. Extremely Long Range access Low & roust modulation schemes, higher power transmission Infrequent traffic Simplifications to Sleep/idle mode protocol Keeping in Mind BACKWARD compatibility 111© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  112. 112. Smart Grids
  113. 113. SMART GRIDS© Thierry Lestable, 2012 113
  114. 114. Smart Grid overview 114© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  115. 115. Smart Energy Management 115© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  116. 116. Smart Grids: IT transport Tech 116© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  117. 117. Smart Grid in Brief… 117© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  118. 118. Grids meet Telcos 118© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  119. 119. Smart Grid plane Source: SGCG/M490/Oct.2012 119© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  120. 120. Smart Grid Mapping Source: SGCG/M490/Oct.2012 120© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  121. 121. Smart Grid Value Chain: Actors & Roles TSO: Transmission System Operator GenCo: Generation Conmpany DSO: Distribution System Operator VPP: Virtual Power Plant DG: Dispersed Generation 121© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  122. 122. Smart Grid: Functional Split 122© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  123. 123. EU Vs US Smart Grid Strategy EU US Background: a fragmented electricity market Background: an aging power grid Deregulation of electricity in some EC states Vision: Vision: Smart meters and AMI are part of the Start with a smart metering toolbox that allows to build a smart grid infrastructure then extend to a smart grid infrastructure network Smart Grids Remote Meter Consumption Management Awareness Smart Grids Smart Smart Demand Metering Home Response AMI Distribution Electrical Wide Area … Grid Transpor Situational management tation Awareness AMI: Advanced Metering Infrastructure Need for a global (architecture) approach and for regional implementation ETSI, as a global and EU based ICT standards organization, is ideally placed 123© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  124. 124. Smart Grid Value chain 124© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  125. 125. Automated Meter Management (AMM)/Smart Meter benefits Demand Side Well- Well-functioning Management and Automated Meter internal Market: reduction of CO2: Management: Better consumers Reduction of peak load by Data storage information consumers information Events storage Better frequency and Easier connection for Remotely managed quality of billing data distributed generation Soft Assist the participation of shedding systems consumers in the electricity Better network observability supply market Demand side management Reduction of operating Easier access to data (IS and better fraud detection system costs: or TIC) in small isolated system will Reduction of cost and limit tariff compensation Reduction of reading and delay of interventions interventions costs Reduction of “non technical losses” Reduction of treatment of billing claim Easier quality of supply management No need of user presence to do simple operations 125© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  126. 126. Opportunity in Smart Meters: Utopia or Reality? © Frost & Sullivan 126© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  127. 127. Smart Meters Market (USA) 127© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  128. 128. European Commission: Mandate M441 / Smart Meter « The General objective of this mandate is to create European standards that will enable interoperability of utility meters (water, gas, electricity, heat), which can then improve the means by which Customers’ awareness of actual consumption can be raised in order to allow timely adaptation to their demands (commonly referred to as ‘smart metering’) » 128© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  129. 129. European Commission: Mandate M441 / Smart Meter 129© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  130. 130. Electricity Meters: French status Multi-index ‘Blue’ Meter Electronic Meter electromechanical Meter16.5 Million meters Linky 7.5 Million meters AMM 9 Million meters 33 millions meters, ¾ electromechanical Only 7.5 millions meters of ERDF (French main DSO) are electronic. Little or no communicating: Each demand of cut, reactivation, tariff or power subscribed modification needs a DSO intervention, Only electronic meters have a “TIC” port transmitting metering info. At most two reading a year Biannual reading by an operator needs, in 50% cases, user to be at home. Suppliers offers limited by access tariff structure Suppliers can’t have their own peak, peak-off,… 130© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  131. 131. Linky high level architecture & service new TIC Dry C. GPRS DSO 35M meters interoperability Euridis port interoperability PLC 700k concentrators Users Suppliers ot n ol pr ope oc AMM limit 131© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  132. 132. Smart Metering (High level) architecture Wind Turbine Home displays TV, Computer Data Center Solar Panel In-Home Energy Display Wan Light Communication Meters Coms Appliances Smart Smart Temperature Breaker Valves Water Gas Smart Elec. Gateway 132© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  133. 133. From To Smart Smart Building Home Energy Collection Unit WAN: Wifi Ethernet GPRS WAN: Wifi Ethernet GPRS www LAN LAN Front-end SAGEM communication Communications server Energ y Load Real Time ! boxes managementMicro-generation Application Energy server operator ENERGY GATEWAY AMR Local Display 133© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  134. 134. Smart Metering: Deployment illustration 134© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  135. 135. Metering Back Office Source: SGCG/M490/Oct.2012 135© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  136. 136. Communication Networks Mapping© Thierry Lestable, 2012 Source: SGCG/M490/Oct.2012 136
  137. 137. Communication Technologies Mapping Source: SGCG/M490/Oct.2012 137© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  138. 138. G3 PLC (OFDM) OFDM System on CENELEC band A Extension of initial G3 PLC is now available G3 To cover higher CENELEC bands: B/C/BC/D/BCD/BD : [98.4 – 146.8] KHz 30 kHz 90 kHz Co-existence Tone notching for S-FSK compatibility •Transformer MV/LV traversal G1 G3 •Repeater capability PHY Details FEC: Reed-Solomon (RS) + CC (+Repetition code for robust mode) Modulation: DBPSK, DQPSK, (D8PSK) Link Adaptation CP-OFDM Nfft = 256 IETF 6LoWPAN / LOAD Routing ~34Kbps MAC: IEEE 802.15.4 PHY: G3 PLC (OFDM) 138© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  139. 139. Need for Trust, Privacy & Security Customer behaviour (privacy) can be easily Identified, classified, and exploited commercially intrusive. 139© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  140. 140. Connected Home – Connected Living 140© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  141. 141. Smart Vehicular environments From Connected Car ToIntelligent Transport Systems (ITS)
  142. 142. Smart Car connectivity 142© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  143. 143. Smart Car: Entertainment 143© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  144. 144. Smart Car: Entertainment Kids VoD Music & Video Streaming News, social Net Videos, music, sport OS, touchscreen user interface Media players… LTE radio 144© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  145. 145. Urban Transit: smart Travel Station 145© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  146. 146. ITS overview 146© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  147. 147. Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) Security & Safety • Stolen vehicle tracking • eCall Services • Roadside Assistance This market is expected to grow significantly thanks to country specific regulation : in US with E911 & E912 directives (“GM Onstar” standard launched in the Americas by GM and ChevyStar), in Brazil with tracking device required in all new cars from mid2009; in Europe with eCall from 2011: from 6M OBU in 2012 to 9M in 2013 (Movea). Interests in automotive marketRoad Charge Insurance• DSRC Module • Monitor leased & mortgaged vehicles• GPS Tolling capabilities • Pay as you drive solutions with CrownThis market is expected to grow Telecom 24Horas in Brazil (VW), other insignificantly thanks to environmental France & Italy.policies in developed countries (TollCollect in Germany, Czech Rep,Kilometre Price in NL, Ecotaxe in Navigation & Driver ServicesFrance) and to efficient toll collect • Dynamic Traffic Informationprograms in emerging countries. • Route Calculation • Real-time Alerts Very fragmented market. 147 © Thierry Lestable, 2011
  148. 148. Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) Feature Europe North America Japan Frequency Band 5.8GHz 915 MHz 5.9GHz 5.8GHz Max Throughput DL: 0.5 DL/UL: 1 0.5 27 (Mbps) UL: 0.25 to 4 ARIB STD Standard CEN IEEE 802.11p/1609 T75 & T88 CEN DSRC norms Year Topic EN 12253 2004 L1 - PHY @ 5.8GHz EN 12795 2003 L2 - Data Link Layer (DLL) EN 12834 2003 L7 - Application Layer EN 13372 2004 DSRC profiles for RTTT EN ISO 14906 2004 Electronic Fee Collection CEN DSRC is not sufficient for V2V and V2I communications! 148© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  149. 149. WAVE, DSRC & IEEE 802.11p • WAVE (Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments) – Mode of operation used by IEEE 802.11 devices to operate in the DSRC band • DSRC (Dedicated Short Range Communications) – ASTM Standard E2213-03, based on IEEE 802.11a – Name of the 5.9GHz band allocated for the ITS communications • IEEE 802.11p – Based on ASTM Standard E2213-03 • DSRC Devices 149© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  150. 150. WAVE, DSRC protocol Stack 150© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  151. 151. WAVE: Key components • IEEE 1609 – P1609.1: Resource Manager – P1609.2: Security Services for Applications & Mgt Msgs – P1609.3: Networking Services – P1609.4: Multi-Channel Operations 151© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  152. 152. DSRC North America • New DSRC (based on 802.11a) OLD NEW 152© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  153. 153. DSRC: Performance Enveloppe North America 153© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  154. 154. European Commission Mandate 154© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  155. 155. European Commission Mandate • Legal Environment • Standard Environment 155© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  156. 156. ETSI ITS: Roadmap 2009-2011 156© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  157. 157. New European Allocation & PHY: ITS-G5 Frequency Usage Regulation Harmonized range standard5 905 MHz to Future ITS ECC Decision [i.9] EN 302 571 [1] 5 925 MHz applications5 875 MHz to ITS road safety ECC Decision [i.9], 5 905 MHz Commission Decision [i.13]5 855 MHz to ITS non-safety ECC Recommendation [i.7] 5 875 MHz applications Channel type Centre Channel Default data TX power TX power5 470 MHz to RLAN (BRAN, ERC Decision [i.8] EN 301 893 [2] frequency spacing rate limit density limit 5 725 MHz WLAN) Commission Decisions [i.11] and [i.12] G5CC 5 900 MHz 10 MHz 6 Mbit/s 33 dBm EIRP 23 dBm/MHz G5SC2 5 890 MHz 10 MHz 12 Mbit/s 23 dBm EIRP 13 dBm/MHz G5SC1 5 880 MHz 10 MHz 6 Mbit/s 33 dBm EIRP 23 dBm/MHz G5SC3 5 870 MHz 10 MHz 6 Mbit/s 23 dBm EIRP 13 dBm/MHz G5SC4 5 860 MHz 10 MHz 6 Mbit/s 0 dBm EIRP -10 dBm/MHz G5SC5 As required in several dependent on 30 dBm EIRP 17 dBm/MHz [2] for the channel (DFS master) band spacing 5 470 MHz to 23 dBm EIRP 10 dBm/MHz 5 725 MHz (DFS slave) The physical layer of ITS-G5 shall be compliant with the profile of IEEE 802.11 – orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) PHY specification for the 5 GHz band 157© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  158. 158. V2V and V2R Communications • Typical V2V • Typical V2R applications applications – Accidents – Road Works areas – Congestions – Speed limits – Blind spot warning – intersections – Lane changeV2V: Vehicle-to-VehicleV2R: Vehicle-to-Roadside (infrastructure) 158 © Thierry Lestable, 2011
  159. 159. ITS: Road Transport / Safety • R2V communications – Roadside equipment sends warning messages – On board equipment receives these messages – Driver is made aware well in advance and has more time to react – Examples • Road works areas, speed limits, dangerous curves, intersections 159© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  160. 160. ITS: Road Transport / Safety • V2V communications – Dedicated vehicles send warning messages to other road users – On board equipment receives these messages – Driver is made aware of such events and can react accordingly – Examples • Emergency services, traffic checks, dragnet controls 160© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  161. 161. ETSI ITS: Automotive Radar • Anti-Collision radar – blind spot warning, lane change, obstacles, parking – EN 302 288 (24 GHz), EN 302 264 (79 GHz) • Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC) – define desired interval and maximum speed to follow traffic – vehicle sets corresponding speed automatically – increase of traffic fluidity, decrease of emissions and fuel consumption – EN 301 091 (77 GHz) 161© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  162. 162. ETSI ITS: Electronic Fee Collection • Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) – 5,8 GHz frequency band mostly used – Base Standards elaborated by CEN • EN 12795, EN 12834, EN 13372 – Specifications for Conformance Testing elaborated by ETSI • TS 102 486 standards family • An envisaged component of the European Electronic Toll Service (EETS) • Alternative deployments possible, e.g. – fees for ferries and tunnels – parking fees • Unique ID required – service provider approach 162© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  163. 163. ETSI ITS: Road Transport Traffic Management • Road Transport and Traffic Telematics (RTTT) – Navigation – Traffic conditions • avoiding congestions • finding alternative routes – Road conditions • ice warnings • floods • Real Time Traffic Information (RTTI) – RDS-TMC (Traffic Management Channel) for FM broadcast – Transport Protocol Experts Group (TPEG) for DAB/DMB/DVB • Future complementary deployments – Vehicle-to-vehicle communications • e.g. congestion messages delivered to broadcasters – Roadside-to-vehicle communications • e.g. ice sensors on bridges 163© Thierry Lestable, 2011
  164. 164. Railways & aeronautics • Railways • Air-to-Air & Air-to- – European Rail Traffic Ground Management System communications & (ERTMS) Navigation Systems • GSM-R • European Train Control • Single European Sky System (ETCS) – Moving Air Traffic Ctrl Regulation to the European – GSM-R Level • Dedicated & harmonized frequency • GSM & RLAN band for Railways onboard – LBS – Passenger information 164© Thierry Lestable, 2011

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