Pushing Buttons & Pulling Triggers: Using Psychology to Connect with People and Create Value

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Everyday marketers, designers and product managers create things that are intended to elicit a response from people. Whether that response is purchasing a product, reading and sharing a message, or clicking through on a website, understanding what makes people tick is critical to getting the desired response. In this session, we will take a look at some science and research that reveal common “people patterns” in thinking, decision-making and behavior that will allow you to create more engaging, creative and meaningful interactions that match the way people think and work, while delivering results.

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Pushing Buttons & Pulling Triggers: Using Psychology to Connect with People and Create Value

  1. PUSHINGBUTTONS& PULLINGTRIGGERS Kelsey Ruger, ChaiONE @themoleskin http://www.themoleskin.com
  2. OMG. Please SHUT UP.
  3. PSYCHOLOGY & COGNITIVE SCIENCETO CONNECT WITH PEOPLEAND CREATE VALUE
  4. A QUICK STORY ABOUTUNDERSTANDING PEOPLE
  5. models help us frame common MODELS APPEAR IN A LOT OF problems and predictions. they DISCIPLINES. work - until they don’t.A QUICK STORY ABOUTUNDERSTANDING PEOPLE
  6. TEACHERS timeline Figures ss ine DisciplFacts
  7. Q: REMEMBER YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER?
  8. KNew facts understood understooddon’t ALWAYS basic motivation when these matter mechanisms mechanisms work Q: REMEMBER YOUR FAVORITE TEACHER?
  9. STOPWHAT’s really going on?
  10. PSYCHOLOGY & COGNITIVE SCIENCE HELPThe study of human perception, thinking and learning canprovide us with crucial insight into the needs of the end user.
  11. PSYCHOLOGY & COGNITIVE SCIENCE HELPThe study of human perception, thinking and learning canprovide us with crucial insight into the needs of the end user. We are looking for psychology studies ways to change or behavior change and create behavior. way it happens
  12. WHY TRIGGERS AND BUTTONS?WE NEED A SIMPLE WAY TO UNDERSTAND WHAT MOTIVATES PEOPLEAND WHAT MAKES THEM TAKE ACTION.
  13. WHY TRIGGERS AND BUTTONS?WE NEED A SIMPLE WAY TO UNDERSTAND WHAT MOTIVATES PEOPLEAND WHAT MAKES THEM TAKE ACTION. WHY CHANGES IN THE WHY UNDERSTANDING THE Putting way MARKETS BEHAVE ROLE OF PSYCHOLOGY IN PSYCHOLOGY & IS IMPORTANT IN our EXPERIENCEs AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE MARKETING Interactions IS CRITICAL to work for you
  14. [DISCLAIMER]I AM NOT A COGNITIVE SCIENTIST }PSYCHOLOGYCOGNITIVE SCIENCE WHETHER YOU ARE ANEUROSCIENCE MARKETER OR DESIGNER ALL THESE SUBJECTS AREPERSUASION BECOMING MORE IMPORTANT TO BUILDING PRODUCTS FORDECISION MAKING TODAY’S CONSUMER.STORYTELLING
  15. LESSONS IN A TWEET1 cognitive science can tell us a lot about how to best create products and services that consumers will want.2 YOUR EXPERTISE MAY NOT BE AS VALUABLE AS YOUR ABILITY TO UNDERSTAND HOW PEOPLE COME MAKE DECISIONS AND PROCESS CHOICES.
  16. WHY CHANGES IN THE way MARKETS BEHAVE IS IMPORTANT IN MARKETINGTHE WORLD HAS CHANGEDBEHAVIOR IS A MUCH LARGER PART OF WHAT WEshould TO BE CONCERNED WITH.
  17. CASE STUDYSAMSUNG APPLE FAN BOY COMMERCIAL
  18. STOPWHAT’s really going on? Heuristics: People often makedecisions based on approximate rules of thumb and not strict logic.Framing: The collection of stereotypes that make up the mental emotional filters individuals rely on to understand and respond to events.Market inefficiencies: These includemis-pricings and non-rational decision making. DAN ARIELY PREDICTABLY IRRATIONAL
  19. PEOPLE DON’T NECESSARILY BUYPRODUCTS BASED ON FEATURES. People don’tnecessarily basetheir decision on aesthetics. YOU SHOULDN’T ASSUME THAT PEOPLE MAKE RATIONAL OR CASE STUDYLOGICAL CHOICES. SAMSUNG APPLE FAN BOY COMMERCIAL
  20. Historically Change right-brained skills will happens based on help you adjust to thesebehavior not technology behavior changes
  21. CONCEPTUAL (CREATORS & EMPATHIZERS) INFORMATION (KNOWLEDGE) INDUSTRIAL (FACTORY)AGRICULTURAL (FARMERS)18TH CENTURY 19TH CENTURY 20TH CENTURY 21ST CENTURY
  22. CONCEPTUAL (CREATORS & EMPATHIZERS) INFORMATION (KNOWLEDGE) INDUSTRIAL (FACTORY) HAVE WE SEEN THE DEATH OFAGRICULTURAL (FARMERS) THE TANGIBLE GOOD?18TH CENTURY 19TH CENTURY 20TH CENTURY 21ST CENTURY
  23. GOODS Service Experience “Want a cup of “The best part of “I can’t start my day coffee for waking up is folgers without a visit to breakfast?” in your cup” Starbucks” CONCEPTUAL INDUSTRIAL INFORMATION (CREATORS & (FACTORY) (KNOWLEDGE) EMPATHIZERS) 4p marketing: new ps Participants, focused on product, process and selling goods. place,promotion, physical evidence tocommodities very price. focused on a fill an experience profitable market need. need.
  24. GOODS Service Experience “Want a cup of “The best part of “I can’t start my day coffee for waking up is folgers without a visit to breakfast?” EXTRINSIC in your cup” Starbucks” MOTIVATORS CONCEPTUAL INDUSTRIAL INFORMATION PRICE (CREATORS & (FACTORY) (KNOWLEDGE) FEATURES EMPATHIZERS) PRODUCT QUALITY 4pUTILITY marketing: new ps Participants, focused on product, process and selling goods. place,promotion, physical evidence tocommodities very price. focused on a fill an experience profitable market need. need.
  25. GOODS Service Experience “Want a cup of “The best part of “I can’t start my day coffee for waking up is folgers without a visit to breakfast?” EXTRINSIC in your cup” INTRINSIC Starbucks” MOTIVATORS MOTIVATORS CONCEPTUAL INDUSTRIAL INFORMATION PRICE FEELING & (CREATORS (FACTORY) (KNOWLEDGE) FEATURES PERSONAL GOALS EMPATHIZERS) PRODUCT QUALITY SOCIAL GOALS 4pUTILITY marketing: SIGNIFICANCE new ps Participants, focused on product, process and selling goods. place,promotion, physical evidence tocommodities very price. focused on a fill an experience profitable market need. need.
  26. CONCEPTUAL (CREATORS & EMPATHIZERS) INFORMATION (KNOWLEDGE) INDUSTRIAL (FACTORY)AGRICULTURAL (FARMERS)18TH CENTURY 19TH CENTURY 20TH CENTURY 21ST CENTURY
  27. CONCEPTUAL (CREATORS & SED EMPATHIZERS) REA INC ALLY NU NTI INFORMATION O VEC (KNOWLEDGE) HA TION MP ONSU NDC INDUSTRIAL ONA UCTI (FACTORY) PROD SATISFACTION HASN’T INCREASED IN KINDAGRICULTURAL (FARMERS)18TH CENTURY 19TH CENTURY 20TH CENTURY 21ST CENTURY
  28. CONCEPTUAL (CREATORS & SED EMPATHIZERS) REA INC ALLY NU NTI INFORMATION O VEC (KNOWLEDGE) HA TION SUMP THIS IS WHERE THE N D CO OPPORTUNITIES LIVE AN INDUSTRIAL ION (FACTORY) DUCT PRO SATISFACTION HASN’T INCREASED IN KINDAGRICULTURAL (FARMERS)18TH CENTURY 19TH CENTURY 20TH CENTURY 21ST CENTURY
  29. THREE KEY TAKEAWAYS
  30. TAKE SIGNIFICANCE SERIOUSLY UTILITY YESTERDAY SIGNIFICANCE TODAY
  31. TAKE SIGNIFICANCE SERIOUSLY UTILITY YESTERDAY SIGNIFICANCE TODAY this is about making things usable
  32. TAKE SIGNIFICANCE SERIOUSLY this is about making things UTILITY useful YESTERDAY SIGNIFICANCE TODAY this is about making things usable
  33. TAKE SIGNIFICANCE SERIOUSLY this is about making things UTILITY useful YESTERDAY SIGNIFICANCE TODAY this is about making things usable IT’s also about making things desirable.
  34. TAKE SIGNIFICANCE SERIOUSLY this is about making things UTILITY useful YESTERDAY SIGNIFICANCE TODAY Bigger margins this is about live here making things usable IT’s also about making things desirable.
  35. INTENT NOT JUST TANGIBLESIT’S NOT JUST TANGIBLES, IT’S ALSO ABOUT INTENT, THE Even if I buy a widget from how I perceive and processCONSUMPTION PROCESS, AND THE POST happen before, you the widget is just things that SERVICEEXPERIENCEevidence ofAthe OF THEduring and after the physical - WITH LOT INTREPRETATION experience I have with you.HAPPENING IN OUR HEADS. experience is also important.
  36. With few exceptions, every job people need or want to do has a social, a functional, and an emotional dimension. If marketers understandeach of these dimensions, then they can design a product thats precisely targeted to the job. CLAYTON M. CHRISTENSEN HARVARD BUSINESS JOURNAL ” In other words, UNDERSTANDING the job, not the DEMOGRAPHIC, is the STARTING PLACE for a marketer who WANTS TO GET THE customers TO buy.
  37. SHIFT HOW WE DEFINE MARKETSTRADITIONAL MARKET NEEDS BASED MARKETDEFINED AS THE GROUP OF THE GROUP OF PEOPLE AND THEACTUAL AND POTENTIAL BUYERS. JOB THEY ARE TRYING TO GET DONE. The fact that youre 18 to 35 we want to understand what years old with a college causes PEOPLE to buy a degree does not cause you product, not whats to buy a product correlated with it.
  38. SHIFT HOW WE DEFINE MARKETSTRADITIONAL MARKET NEEDS BASED MARKETDEFINED AS THE GROUP OF THE GROUP OF PEOPLE AND THEACTUAL AND POTENTIAL BUYERS. JOB THEY ARE TRYING TO GET DONE. The fact that youre 18 to 35 we want to understand what years old with a college causes PEOPLE to buy a degree does not cause you product, not whats to buy a product correlated with it. originates from COMPETITION or AN INTERNAL VIEW OF CUSTOMER need.
  39. SHIFT HOW WE DEFINE MARKETSTRADITIONAL MARKET NEEDS BASED MARKETDEFINED AS THE GROUP OF THE GROUP OF PEOPLE AND THEACTUAL AND POTENTIAL BUYERS. JOB THEY ARE TRYING TO GET DONE. The fact that youre 18 to 35 we want to understand what years old with a college causes PEOPLE to buy a degree does not cause you product, not whats to buy a product correlated with it. originates from originates from COMPETITION or AN WHAT A NEED IS AND INTERNAL VIEW OF WHY CUSTOMERS CUSTOMER need. MAKE THAT CHOICE.
  40. Primary job FUNCTIONAL EMOTIONALdirect jobs indirectly jobs personal jobs social jobs THE CUSTOMER’S EXPECTED OUTCOME
  41. Primary job FUNCTIONAL EMOTIONALdirect jobs indirectly jobs personal jobs social jobs THE CUSTOMER’S EXPECTED OUTCOME EXPERIENCE
  42. LESSONS IN A TWEET1 Predicting markets is hard now, success requires a strategy for influencing consumer behavior in a sustained and positive manner.2 Experiences happen in our heads, managing them requires some attention to how we actually process information and experiences.
  43. THE ROLE OF PSYCHOLOGY IN our EXPERIENCEs AND Interactions IS CRITICALPUTTING EXPERIENCEIN PERSPECTIVE
  44. TO GET STARTED....What is *not* Experience
  45. WHAT IS EXPERIENCE?
  46. WHAT GOES INTO STAGING APERFORMANCE? PARTICIPANTS PLACE PROCESSThe Stage The Actors The Audience The director The SCRIPT USHERS STAGE HANDS Sales Agent
  47. WHAT GOES INTO STAGING APERFORMANCE? PARTICIPANTS PLACE PROCESSThe Stage The Actors The Audience The director The SCRIPT USHERS STAGE HANDS Sales Agent
  48. EXPERIENCEIS THE FEELING PEOPLEINTERACTING WITHYOUR COMPANY GET
  49. EXPERIENCEIS THE FEELING PEOPLEINTERACTING WITHYOUR COMPANY GET IN THEIR GUT
  50. IN THEIR HEADEXPERIENCEIS THE FEELING PEOPLEINTERACTING WITHYOUR COMPANY GET IN THEIR GUT
  51. THE TRIGGERSEXPERIENCESHOULD BE MANAGED THROUGH INTERACTIONS THE BUTTONS
  52. WHAT IS EXPERIENCE DESIGN?IMPROVING THE USER’S PERCEPTION OF AN EXPERIENCEWITH A PRODUCT OR SERVICE THROUGH GREATARCHITECTURE AND THE PURPOSEFUL DESIGN OFINTERACTIONS.understand behavior enable behavior influence behavior
  53. 3 PARTS OF EXPERIENCEunderstand behavior enable behavior influence behaviorUSER INTERACTION PERSUASIONRESEARCH DESIGN DESIGN
  54. 3 PARTS OF EXPERIENCEunderstand behavior enable behavior influence behavior • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTIONUSER INTERACTION PERSUASIONRESEARCH DESIGN DESIGN
  55. 3 PARTS OF EXPERIENCEunderstand behavior enable behavior influence behavior • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTION • INTERACTIONUSER INTERACTION PERSUASIONRESEARCH DESIGN DESIGN
  56. Feeling Thinking ActingWhat motivates Framing how they What behavior can a customer? perceive an experience be driven through understanding?
  57. LESSONS IN A TWEET1 experiences are the sum of the interactions are person has with an organization.2 more and more marketing is about directing the interactions that make up an experience.
  58. Putting PSYCHOLOGY COGNITIVE SCIENCE to work for youMAPPING EXPERIENCE AND PSYCHOLOGYRELATING MOTIVATION TO EXPERIENCE
  59. Q: WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PEOPLE?
  60. we depend on mental models we want to be in control we don’t like change we’re not great at rememberingwe love a good story we are highly visual by nature we do have some limitations we are social creaturesWe’re curiouswe don’t want to put in a lot of effort we love patternswe make mistakes Q: WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PEOPLE?
  61. WHAT DOES SCIENCE DO FOR US? GOAL: IMPROVING THE USER’S PERCEPTION OF AN EXPERIENCE WITH A PRODUCT OR SERVICE 1 HELPS WITH FRAMING AND TIMING HOW OUR ENVIRONMENT TIMING AFFECT DECISIONS 2 HELPS US UNDERSTAND DECISION MAKING PROCESSES HOW WE MAKE DECISIONS THE ROLE OF EMOTION 3 HELPS US ALIGN OUR GOALS WITH CONSUMER NEEDS MAKING SURE OUR GOALS DON’T CONFLICT WITH NEEDS 4 GIVES US HEURISTICS TO GUIDE THE WAY SHORTCUTS FOR ALIGNING GOALS NEEDS
  62. YOU COULD STUDYALL THE INFORMATION...
  63. HERE ARE SOME OF THE RESOURCES
  64. RULES OFTHUMB
  65. RECOGNIZEGOOD AND BADPATTERNSGOOD PATTERNSGood patterns are those that arecreated to help us to get work donefaster and more effectively. BAD PATTERNS Patterns that are assumed or ignored because we don’t understand patterns of behavior.
  66. BEHAVIOR HABITSB.J. FOGGResearcher, Stanford FOGG BEHAVIOR MODEL Tiny Habits project
  67. motivation x PLEASURE PAIN x WHY WOULD I HOPE FEAR DO THIS? x ACCEPTANCE REJECTION TRUST SHOULD BE PRESENT Motivation Ability must be in sync to work ability RESOURCESDO I HAVE THE Time Physical Effort Social DevianceSKILLS TO DO Money Brain Cycles Non-Routine THIS? Timing opportunity windows trigger SPARKS = Trigger + Motivation + AbilityWHAT GETS ME TO FACILITATOR = Trigger + High Motivation - Ability TAKE ACTION? SIGNAL = Trigger + Balanced Ability Motivation
  68. OPPORTUNITYWINDOWS OPENAND CLOSE
  69. OPPORTUNITYWINDOWS OPENAND CLOSE THERE ARE ALWAYS WINDOWS WHERE PERSUASION WILL BE MORE EFFECTIVE. Time / Place / Context
  70. OPPORTUNITY WINDOWS OPEN AND CLOSEin a good moodworldview no longer makes senseaction can be taken immediatelyFeel indebted because of favor immediately after a mistake immediately after denying a request
  71. OPPORTUNITY WINDOWS OPEN AND CLOSEin a good mood Sync these with theworldview no longer makes sense behavior you are trying to Encourageaction can be taken immediatelyFeel indebted because of favor immediately after a mistake immediately after denying a request
  72. AVOID MISTAKES IN BEHAVIOR CHANGEPersuasive Technology Lab at Stanford 1 BELIEVING THAT INFORMATION LEADS TO ACTION 2 FOCUSING ON ABSTRACT GOALS INSTEAD OF TANGIBLE BEHAVIOR 3 SEEKING TO CHANGE BEHAVIOR FORVER INSTEAD IN THE SHORT-TERM4 ASSUMING BEHAVIOR CHANGE IS DIFFICULT5 TRYING TO STOP OLD BEHAVIOR INSTEAD OF CREATING A NEW ONE6 RELYING ON WILLPOWER FOR LONG-TERM CHANGE 7 ATTEMPTING BIG LEAPS INSTEAD OF BABY-STEPS8 IGNORING HOW ENVIRONMENT SHAPES BEHAVIOR9 BLAMING FAILURE ON LACK OF MOTIVATION10 UNDERESTIMATING THE POWER OF TRIGGERS
  73. AVOID MISTAKES IN BEHAVIOR CHANGEPersuasive Technology Lab at Stanford 1 BELIEVING THAT INFORMATION LEADS TO ACTION 2 FOCUSING ON ABSTRACT GOALS INSTEAD OF TANGIBLE BEHAVIOR 3 SEEKING TO CHANGE BEHAVIOR FORVER INSTEAD IN THE SHORT-TERM4 ASSUMING BEHAVIOR CHANGE IS DIFFICULT5 TRYING TO STOP OLD BEHAVIOR INSTEAD OF CREATING A NEW ONE6 RELYING ON WILLPOWER FOR LONG-TERM CHANGE 7 ATTEMPTING BIG LEAPS INSTEAD OF BABY-STEPS8 IGNORING HOW ENVIRONMENT SHAPES BEHAVIOR9 BLAMING FAILURE ON LACK OF MOTIVATION10 UNDERESTIMATING THE POWER OF TRIGGERS
  74. USE FRAMEWORKSAS HEURISTICS FOR BEHAVIOR DESIGN STEPHEN ANDERSON’S MENTAL NOTES
  75. USE FRAMEWORKSAS HEURISTICS FOR BEHAVIOR DESIGN DAN LOCKTON’S DESIGN WITH INTENT
  76. USE STORYRemember we are all the hero of our own stories.
  77. Kelsey Ruger’s Face ReveStory Halo wer Ans all C The Trial lat Triu ions & mph The s ir he ns T o Th f Ev ind irati e C en F p o As DELIVERY lim ts ax (Middle) e rs Ch et Th cte RE (E ara Me The e Endin SO ND) gin P Th g) Reso (Be TU nin LU lutio SE TIO Set The Stage n& g N I N S P I R E Presentation ta ting Da Learnin Story Halo es Eth ibility & Sourc (Cr Styles os e ) g Suppor gic d os ) ng Lo (Lo Un Pathos nt Sto ivers (Emotion) n te re rie al Co uctu s Str Met ry & a Sto age Sub ries & Im Plot Vi sual yout s La
  78. Face Reve er lat A nsw ll The Trial Triu ions & Ca mph The s ir he ns d T tio Th f Ev Fin pira e C en o As DELIVERY lim ts ax e (Middle) rs Ch et Th cte RE ara Me The e Endin S P Th ) OL D) Reso ing (Be TU (EN n UT lutio gin SESet The IOStage n& g N I N S P I R E INITIATE CHANGE BY USING CONTRAST IN YOUR DELIVERY
  79. Face Reve er lat A nsw ll The Trial Triu ions & Ca mph The s ir he ns d T tio Th f Ev Fin pira e C en o As DELIVERY lim ts ax e (Middle) rs Ch et Th cte RE ara Me The e Endin What Gets S P Th ) OL D) Reso ing Them Going? (Be TU (EN n UT lutio gin SESet The IOStage n& g N I N S P I R E INITIATE CHANGE BY USING CONTRAST IN YOUR DELIVERY
  80. Face Reve er lat A nsw ll The Trial Triu ions & Ca What Will mph The s ir he ns d T tio They Face? Th f Ev Fin pira e C en o As DELIVERY lim ts ax e (Middle) rs Ch et Th cte RE ara Me The e Endin What Gets S P Th ) OL D) Reso ing Them Going? (Be TU (EN n UT lutio gin SESet The IOStage n& g N I N S P I R E INITIATE CHANGE BY USING CONTRAST IN YOUR DELIVERY
  81. Face Reve er lat A nsw ll The Trial Triu ions & Ca What Will mph The s ir he ns d T tio They Face? Th f Ev Fin pira e C en o As DELIVERY lim ts ax e (Middle) rs Ch et Th cte What Will RE ara Me The e Endin What Gets S P Th ) OL D) Reso They Learn? ing Them Going? (Be TU (EN n UT lutio gin SESet The IOStage n& g N I N S P I R E INITIATE CHANGE BY USING CONTRAST IN YOUR DELIVERY
  82. PRODUCEMEANING FOR THE HEROBY CREATING A BALANCED MESSAGE I N S P I R E Presentation ta ting DaLearnin Story Halo es Eth ibility & Sourc (Cr Styles os e ) g Suppor gic d os ) ng Lo (Lo Un Pathos t Sto ivers (Emotion) en re nt tu rie al Co uc s Str M et ry & a Sto age Sub ries & m Plot ual I out Vis Lay s
  83. ENGAGEMENT MEANS...Using persuasion, understanding emotion building trust
  84. BRAIN SCIENCE AT WORKWHAT MAKES US TICK REPTILIAN BRAIN LIMBIC BRAIN NEOCORTEX Controls instinctual action Controls EMOTION Controls logic and ration I feel like I know I’ll give you 10 I WANT FOOD! reasons why I WANT Feed ME! why I want Food Food.
  85. HOW DO YOUTIE THESE IDEASTOGETHER?
  86. TRUST CREDIBILITY CONSISTENCYPEOPLE LOOK FOR CONSISTENT MESSAGESOne of the fastest-moving destroyers of trust is inconsistency.inconsistent messages internally externally can havesignificant repercussions.
  87. TRUST CREDIBILITY STANDARDSPEOPLE WANT BALANCED STANDARDSIf people believe that an individual or the company hasinconsistent standards, their trust will be eroded. People keepscore – relentlessly.
  88. TRUST CREDIBILITY DISCLOSUREWHEN PEOPLE LACK INFORMATION THEY WILLMAKE UP THEIR OWN STORIESWhen making changes Avoid potential break downs in trust. ifPeople don’t know the full story (maybe the full story doesn’texist yet), they’ll quite naturally over-interpret any shard ofinformation they get their hands on. Usually negatively.
  89. 6 PRINCIPLES OFPERSUASION
  90. 6 PRINCIPLES OF PERSUASIONPRINCIPLE: LIKINGPEOPLE LIKE THOSE LIKE THEM, WHO LIKE THEM Business Application Similarity - Create early bonds with new peers,bosses, and direct reports by informally discovering common interest—you’ll establish goodwill and trustworthiness. Praise - Charm and disarm. Make positive remarks about others—you’ll generate more willing compliance.
  91. 6 PRINCIPLES OF PERSUASIONPRINCIPLE: RECIPROCITYPEOPLE REPAY IN KIND Business Application Lend a hand to a customer who needs help; you’ll get his help later.
  92. 6 PRINCIPLES OF PERSUASIONPRINCIPLE: SOCIAL PROOFPEOPLE FOLLOW THE LEAD OF SIMILAR OTHERSBusiness ApplicationUse peer power to influence horizontally, not vertically;e.g., ask an esteemed “old timer” to support yournew initiative if other veterans resist.
  93. 6 PRINCIPLES OF PERSUASIONPRINCIPLE: CONSISTENCYPEOPLE FULFILL WRITTEN PUBLIC AND VOLUNTARYCOMMITMENTS.Business ApplicationMake others’ commitments active, public, and voluntary.If you want customers to donate by a certain date, get thatunderstanding in writing (a memo); make thecommitment public (note other customer’ agreementswith the memo); and link the commitment to thecustomer’s values (the impact of donations on communityspirit).
  94. 6 PRINCIPLES OF PERSUASIONPRINCIPLE: AUTHORITYPEOPLE DEFER TO EXPERTS WHO PROVIDESHORTCUTS TO DECISIONS REQUIRINGSPECIALIZED INFORMATION.Business ApplicationDon’t assume your expertise is self-evident. Instead,establish your expertise before doing business with newcolleagues or partners; e.g., in conversations before animportant meeting, describe how you solved a problemsimilar to the one on the agenda.
  95. 6 PRINCIPLES OF PERSUASIONPRINCIPLE: SCARCITY:PEOPLE VALUE WHAT’S SCARCEBusiness ApplicationUse exclusive information to persuade. Influence andrivet key players’ attention by saying, for example:“…Just got this information today. It won’t be distributeduntil next week.”
  96. LESSONS IN A TWEET1 WE not rational, We still ruled by emotion, that’s what makes us human2 The more you know about people, the more you will know about what you should be doing in marketing product development

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