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Advertising in Psychology

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A lecture I did at Temple University that explored advertising's role in the academic world of developmental psychology, and also psychology's role in the creative world of advertising.

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Advertising in Psychology

  1. 1. ADVERTISING IN PSYCHOLOGY Foundations in Developmental Psychology Temple University Guest Lecture by Lucas Shanks November 16th, 2012
  2. 2. WHO THE FUCK IS THIS GUY?
  3. 3. So… here we are.ADVERTISING IN PSYCHOLOGY
  4. 4. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISING
  5. 5. AGENDAYOUR WORLDAdvertising as it applies to the academic world of psychology.MY WORLDHow psychology fits into the creative world of advertising.
  6. 6. YOUR WORLD
  7. 7. BEHAVIOR CONTEXT DEPENDENCY DISTORTION SOCIAL VALIDATIONCONSUMER ATTITUDES WHY DOES SEX SELL? DUAL PROCESS THEORIES MANIPULATION FOCAL ATTENTION YOUR WORLD PERSUASIONDOES ADVERTISING WORK? CONTEXT MEMORY WHO EVEN BUYS THIS SHIT? INFORMATION PROCESSING WHY IS SHE SO SKINNY? CONSUMERISM COGNITIVE RESPONSE
  8. 8. “The billboard is finished when you can no longer find a single element to remove.” - Robert Fleege
  9. 9. YOUR WORLD I’ll introduce consumer behavior. I’ll talk about what influences behavior. I’ll focus on attitudes. I’ll explain two models that use attitudes to predict behavior.
  10. 10. CONSUMER BEHAVIOR
  11. 11. WHAT INFLUENCES BEHAVIOR?
  12. 12. ATTITUDE
  13. 13. ATTITUDE“A learned predisposition to behave in a consistently favorable or unfavorable manner with respect to people, objects, advertisements or issues”
  14. 14. ATTITUDES ARE LEARNED
  15. 15. HOW ATTITUDES ARE LEARNEDA shift from no attitude to some attitude, as a result of learning.Favorable/Unfavorable Brands as a Result of Classical Conditioning: Unconditioned Stimulus Conditioned Stimulus Unconditioned Response Cowboys, Outdoors Marlboro Cigarettes Rugged, cool cigarette brand Lung Cancer, Death Smoking Smoking is terrible, dangerous
  16. 16. ATTITUDES ARE NOT PERMANENT
  17. 17. STRATEGIES OF ATTITUDE CHANGEAttitude changes are learned; they are influenced by personal experience andother sources of information, and personality affects receptivity and thespeed at which attitudes are likely to be altered.Market Leaders: Fortify existing positive attitudes so customers won’tconsider a competitor’s offer or inducements.Competitors: Take aim at market leaders, change the attitudes of marketleaders’ customers.
  18. 18. ATTITUDES PREDICT BEHAVIOR
  19. 19. OF MANY MODELS, TWO
  20. 20. TRICOMPONENT MODELAccording to the Tricomponent Model, attitudes have three components: Cognitive: Knowledge gained from direct experience with a product Affective: Emotions or feelings about a particular product Conative: The intention to buy the product again
  21. 21. ATTITUDE-TOWARD-THE-AD MODELA consumer forms various feelings and judgments as the result of exposure toan advertisement, which affects the consumer’s attitude towards the brand,and subsequently, purchase intentions.1. Consumer sees ad: “That Old Spice commercial was hilarious.”2. Consumer recalls brand: “Old Spice is a pretty cool brand.”3. Consumer sees product: “I’m going to go with Old Spice.”
  22. 22. THAT WAS PROFESSIONAL
  23. 23. THIS IS AMATEUR
  24. 24. MY WORLD
  25. 25. MY WORLD I’ll talk about me. I’ll talk about an ad agency. I’ll talk about the role of psychology specific to agency disciplines. We’ll look at a bunch of work.
  26. 26. WHO THE FUCK IS THIS GUY AGAIN?
  27. 27. LET’S ASK FREUDId Ego Superego
  28. 28. AN AD AGENCYAccount Creative Planning Clients
  29. 29. PERCPECTIVES IN ADVERTISING
  30. 30. THE ACCOUNT EXECUTIVEAs seen by… …themselves …the planner …the client …the creative
  31. 31. THE CREATIVEAs seen by… …themselves …account …the planner …the the client
  32. 32. THE PLANNERAs seen by… …themselves …account …the client …the creative
  33. 33. THE CLIENTAs seen by… …themselves …account …the planner …the creative
  34. 34. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISING Account Creative Planning Clients
  35. 35. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISING Creative Planning
  36. 36. THE PLANNER
  37. 37. THE PLANNER – THE BRIEFINCLUDESWho: Target AudienceWhat: Product/Market BackgroundWhere/When: MediaWhy: Reason to BelieveSingle-Minded Proposition
  38. 38. THE PLANNER – THE BRIEFSEGMENTATION CONSUMER INSIGHTSThings we “know.” Things we “think we know.”Measuring and valuation. Learning and anticipating.Data: geographic, demographic, Deeper understanding of what targetpsychographic and socioeconomic. segment thinks, feels and believes.“Female, 30-45, suburbs, 1-2 kids, “More than a brand of razors,works from home, watches ‘Dancing teenage boys just want to know howWith The Stars.’” to shave.”
  39. 39. WHY?
  40. 40. BRAND LOYALTY
  41. 41. WHO, WHAT, WHERE/WHEN, WHY...
  42. 42. CREATIVE WORK IS THE HOW
  43. 43. THE CREATIVE
  44. 44. THE CREATIVE – THE WORKCREATIVE PROCESSClient, Account, Planner, Creative, Planner, Account, Client, Repeat…CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT“The Most Interesting Man In The World”EXECUTIONTV, Print, OOH, Radio, Web, Collateral, Digital, Social…
  45. 45. CREATIVE CONSIDERATIONS
  46. 46. PERSPECTIVE
  47. 47. MORALITY
  48. 48. LAWRENCE KOHLBERGStages of Moral Development Pre-Conventional Morality Stage 1 Obedience and punishment orientation Obey authority, avoid punishment Stage 2 Self-interest orientation Recognize dilemma, pursue self-interest Conventional Morality Stage 3 Interpersonal accord and conformity Cooperate, meet social expectations Authority and social order maintaining Stage 4 orientation Decide what’s best for greater society Post-Conventional Morality Stage 5 Social contract orientation Respect values to compete democratically Stage 6 Universal ethics principles Principles based on what is most just
  49. 49. GENDER CULTURE AGESEXUALITY MORE PERSPECTIVE EDUCATION SOCIAL ISSUES MATURITY GEOGRAPHY
  50. 50. THE WORK
  51. 51. GENDER
  52. 52. P&G
  53. 53. U by Kotex
  54. 54. AGE
  55. 55. EDUCATION
  56. 56. Old Milwaukee
  57. 57. MATURITY
  58. 58. Diesel – SFW Porn
  59. 59. GEOGRAPHY
  60. 60. SOCIAL ISSUES
  61. 61. SEXUALITY
  62. 62. CULTURE
  63. 63. FINAL THOUGHTS
  64. 64. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISINGAt our worst… “The thing I hate most about advertising is it attracts all the bright, ambitious young people, leaving us mainly with the slow and self-obsessed to become our artists. Modern art is a disaster area. Never in the field of human history has so much been used by so many to say so little.” - Banksy, Graffiti Artist/Activist …we piss off Banksy.
  65. 65. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISINGHowever… “The irony is that while there has never been more ways to reach consumers, it’s never been harder to connect with consumers.” - Brad Jakeman, former CCO of Activision …things are changing.
  66. 66. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISINGSo at our best… …we help brands entertain.
  67. 67. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISINGAt our best… …we challenge.
  68. 68. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISINGAt our best… …we help heal.
  69. 69. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISINGAt our best… …yes, we can save lives.
  70. 70. PSYCHOLOGY IN ADVERTISINGAt our best… …we surprise.
  71. 71. WHY DOES WORK FALL FLAT?
  72. 72. “If you talked to people the way advertising talked to people, they’d punch you in the face.” - Hugh MacLeod, Cartoonist/Author
  73. 73. WHAT MAKES GREAT WORK?
  74. 74. BREAKTHROUGH WORK
  75. 75. “The irony is that while there has never been more ways to reach consumers, it’s never been harder to connect with consumers.” - Brad Jakeman, former CCO of Activision
  76. 76. WE’RE PART OF THE CONVERSATION
  77. 77. ANY QUESTIONS?
  78. 78. THANK YOU
  79. 79. LUCAS SHANKS lucas.shanks@gmail.com www.lucasshanks.com

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