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PRESENTED BY
SAMITA KHATIWADA
III YR BSC. NURSING
The Teratogenic property of
the infection was documented
by an Australian
ophthalmologist Norman
McAlister Gregg, in 1941
 Rubella, commonly known as German
measles, is a disease caused by Rubella virus.
The name is derived from the Latin, mea...
 Rubella is a disease caused by the rubella virus.
 Also known as German Measles or 3 day
measles
 Rubella is usually a...
 Rubella virus is single
stranded RNA virus
 Diameter 50 – 70 nm
 Enveloped Spherical
 Virus multiply in the
cytoplasm...
AGENT
ENVIRONMENTHOST
• Caused by an RNA virus of the togavirus
family.
• It can be propagated in cell culture
Agent
• Large no of rubella infec...
AGE
•Disease of childhood (3-10 years)
IMMUNITY
•One attacks results in life long immunity;
second attacks are rare.
• 40 ...
 Disease usually occurs in a seasonal
pattern i.e. in temperate zones during
the later winter and spring, with
epidemics ...
 The virus is transmitted directly from person to
person by droplet nuclei from nose and throat.
 The portal of entry is...
2-3 weeks Average 18
days
 Malaise
 Low grade fever
 Morbilliform rash
 Rash starts on Face
Extremities
 Rarely lasts more than 5
days
 No fea...
 "Rubella infection in
pregnant women during
the first three months of
pregnancy may result in
the baby being born with
b...
Occurs in Neonates and Childhood
 Lasts for 13 – 15 days
 Leads to development of antibodies
 The appearance of antibod...
 Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) refers to
infants born with defects secondary to
intrauterine infection.
 It occurs i...
 the most common and major defects are
deafness, cardiac malformations and cataracts.
deafness cataracts PDA
 Other defects includes
 Glaucoma
 Retinopathy
 Microcephalus
 Cerebral palsy
 Intrauterine growth retardation
 Hep...
 Throat swab culture for virus isolation and
serology.
 Haemagglutination inhibition test (HAI)
 Others includes ELISA ...
 There is no specific treatment for Rubella;
management is a matter of responding to
symptoms to diminish discomfort.
 Rubella vaccine is given to children at 15
months of age as a part of the MMR (measles-
mumps-rubella) immunization.
 I...
 The MMR vaccine is a mixture of three live
attenuated viruses, administered via injection
for immunization against measl...
Rubella
Rubella
Rubella
Rubella
Rubella
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Rubella

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rubella an its management

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Rubella

  1. 1. PRESENTED BY SAMITA KHATIWADA III YR BSC. NURSING
  2. 2. The Teratogenic property of the infection was documented by an Australian ophthalmologist Norman McAlister Gregg, in 1941
  3. 3.  Rubella, commonly known as German measles, is a disease caused by Rubella virus. The name is derived from the Latin, meaning little red.  Rubella is also known as German measles because the disease was first described by German physicians, Friedrich Hoffmann, in the mid-eighteenth century.
  4. 4.  Rubella is a disease caused by the rubella virus.  Also known as German Measles or 3 day measles  Rubella is usually a mild illness.  Most people who have had rubella or the vaccine are protected against the virus for the rest of their lives.  Because of routine vaccination against rubella since 1970 , rubella is now rarely reported
  5. 5.  Rubella virus is single stranded RNA virus  Diameter 50 – 70 nm  Enveloped Spherical  Virus multiply in the cytoplasm of infected cell
  6. 6. AGENT ENVIRONMENTHOST
  7. 7. • Caused by an RNA virus of the togavirus family. • It can be propagated in cell culture Agent • Large no of rubella infections are Sub- clinical. Source of Infection • It is much less communicable than measles. • It probably extends from a week before symptoms to about a week after rash appears. Period of communicability
  8. 8. AGE •Disease of childhood (3-10 years) IMMUNITY •One attacks results in life long immunity; second attacks are rare. • 40 % of women of child bearing age are susceptible to rubella in India,
  9. 9.  Disease usually occurs in a seasonal pattern i.e. in temperate zones during the later winter and spring, with epidemics of every 4-9 years
  10. 10.  The virus is transmitted directly from person to person by droplet nuclei from nose and throat.  The portal of entry is via the respiratory route.  The virus can cross the placenta and infect the foetus in uterus, leading to congenital rubella in new born
  11. 11. 2-3 weeks Average 18 days
  12. 12.  Malaise  Low grade fever  Morbilliform rash  Rash starts on Face Extremities  Rarely lasts more than 5 days  No features of the rash give clues to definitive diagnosis of Rubella.
  13. 13.  "Rubella infection in pregnant women during the first three months of pregnancy may result in the baby being born with birth defects or congenital rubella syndrome.
  14. 14. Occurs in Neonates and Childhood  Lasts for 13 – 15 days  Leads to development of antibodies  The appearance of antibodies coincides the appearance of suggestive immulogic basis for the rash  In 20 – 50 % cases of primary infections are subclinical
  15. 15.  Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) refers to infants born with defects secondary to intrauterine infection.  It occurs if the infant has IgM rubella antibodies shortly after birth or IgG antibodies persist for more than 6 months, by the time maternally derived antibodies would have disappeared.
  16. 16.  the most common and major defects are deafness, cardiac malformations and cataracts. deafness cataracts PDA
  17. 17.  Other defects includes  Glaucoma  Retinopathy  Microcephalus  Cerebral palsy  Intrauterine growth retardation  Hepato-splenomegaly  Mental and motor retardation
  18. 18.  Throat swab culture for virus isolation and serology.  Haemagglutination inhibition test (HAI)  Others includes ELISA test and radio-immune assay.
  19. 19.  There is no specific treatment for Rubella; management is a matter of responding to symptoms to diminish discomfort.
  20. 20.  Rubella vaccine is given to children at 15 months of age as a part of the MMR (measles- mumps-rubella) immunization.  Isolation of the patient.  Strict avoidance of close contact with patient.  Vaccination to girls(11-14 years), duration of immunity pffered being 10 years.  Other precautionary measures are needed as applied to air borne infection.
  21. 21.  The MMR vaccine is a mixture of three live attenuated viruses, administered via injection for immunization against measles, mumps and rubella.  It is generally administered to children around the age of one year, with a second dose before starting school (i.e. age 4/5).  The second dose is not a booster; it is a dose to produce immunity in the small number of persons (2-5%) who fail to develop measles immunity after the first dose.

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