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Copyright © 2006
Pearson Education Canada Inc.
Chapter 2
Introduction to Consumer
Behaviour
Sharq Institute of higher
Educ...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-2
Consumer Behaviour
The behaviour that consumers
display in searching fo...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-3
Personal Consumer
The individual who buys goods
and services for his or...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-4
Development of the Marketing
Concept
Production
Concept
Selling Concept...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-5
The Production Concept
 Assumes that consumers are interested
primaril...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-6
The Product Concept
 Assumes that consumers will buy the
product that ...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-7
The Selling Concept
 Assumes that consumers are unlikely
to buy a prod...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-8
The Marketing Concept
 Assumes that to be successful, a
company must d...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-9
Implementing the Marketing
Concept
Consumer Research
Segmentation
Ta...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-10
Segmentation, Targeting, and
Positioning
 Segmentation: process of di...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-11
Successful Positioning
Communicating the benefits of
the product, rat...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-12
The Marketing Mix
Product
Price
Place
Promotion
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-13
The Societal Marketing Concept
 All companies prosper when society
pr...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-14
Digital Revolution in the
Marketplace
 Allows customization of produc...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-15
Digital Revolution in the
Marketplace - Continued
The exchange betwee...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-16
Why study consumer behaviour?
 Understanding consumer behaviour
will ...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-17
Why study consumer behaviour?
 Knowledge of consumer behaviour is
ess...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-18
Why study consumer behaviour?
 Public service initiatives have to be
...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-19
Why study consumer behaviour?
Better understanding of our own
consump...
Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-20
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Intoducton of cb chp2

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Consumer Behavior

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Intoducton of cb chp2

  1. 1. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. Chapter 2 Introduction to Consumer Behaviour Sharq Institute of higher Education Najeebhemat
  2. 2. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-2 Consumer Behaviour The behaviour that consumers display in searching for, purchasing, using, evaluating, and disposing of products and services that they expect will satisfy their needs.
  3. 3. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-3 Personal Consumer The individual who buys goods and services for his or her own use, for household use, for the use of a family member, or for a friend.
  4. 4. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-4 Development of the Marketing Concept Production Concept Selling Concept Product Concept Marketing Concept
  5. 5. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-5 The Production Concept  Assumes that consumers are interested primarily in product availability at low prices  Marketing objectives: – Cheap, efficient production – Intensive distribution – Market expansion
  6. 6. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-6 The Product Concept  Assumes that consumers will buy the product that offers them the highest quality, the best performance, and the most features  Marketing objectives: – Quality improvement – Addition of features  Tendency toward Marketing Myopia.
  7. 7. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-7 The Selling Concept  Assumes that consumers are unlikely to buy a product unless they are aggressively persuaded to do so  Marketing objectives: – Sell, sell, sell  Lack of concern for customer needs and satisfaction
  8. 8. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-8 The Marketing Concept  Assumes that to be successful, a company must determine the needs and wants of specific target markets and deliver the desired satisfactions better than the competition  Marketing objectives: –Profits through customer satisfaction
  9. 9. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-9 Implementing the Marketing Concept Consumer Research Segmentation Targeting Positioning
  10. 10. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-10 Segmentation, Targeting, and Positioning  Segmentation: process of dividing the market into subsets of consumers with common needs or characteristics  Targeting: selecting one ore more of the segments to pursue  Positioning: developing a distinct image for the product in the mind of the consumer
  11. 11. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-11 Successful Positioning Communicating the benefits of the product, rather than its features Communicating a Unique Selling Proposition for the product
  12. 12. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-12 The Marketing Mix Product Price Place Promotion
  13. 13. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-13 The Societal Marketing Concept  All companies prosper when society prospers.  Companies, as well as individuals, would be better off if social responsibility was an integral component of every marketing decision.  Requires all marketers adhere to principles of social responsibility.
  14. 14. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-14 Digital Revolution in the Marketplace  Allows customization of products, services, and promotional messages like never before  Enhances relationships with customers more effectively and efficiently  Has increased the power of customers and given them access to more information
  15. 15. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-15 Digital Revolution in the Marketplace - Continued The exchange between consumers and marketers has become more interactive Many affect the way marketing is done
  16. 16. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-16 Why study consumer behaviour?  Understanding consumer behaviour will help you become better marketers as it is the foundation for  Segmenting markets  Positioning products  Developing an appropriate marketing Plan.  continued
  17. 17. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-17 Why study consumer behaviour?  Knowledge of consumer behaviour is essential for non-profit organizations – Non profits have different customers to please – Donors, users, volunteers, general public, government » continued
  18. 18. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-18 Why study consumer behaviour?  Public service initiatives have to be based on an understanding of consumer behaviour federal government also need the knowledge of consumer behaviour. –Most government initiatives (e.g., antismoking campaigns) need a knowledge of consumer behaviour to succeed » continued
  19. 19. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-19 Why study consumer behaviour? Better understanding of our own consumption behaviour
  20. 20. Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc. 1-20

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