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the difference between competence and competency

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the difference between competence and competency

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the difference between competence and competency

  1. 1. Competence and Competency Analysis PRESENTED BY:- ABHISHEK CHAUDHARI (11307) 1
  2. 2. What is Competence?  The word competence, though common in day to day parlance as ability or qualification of an individual, has many connotations in different fields.  For example, in biology, competence refers to the ability of a cell to take up DNA.  In geology, competence of the rock the resistance it offers against erosion.  In jurisprudence, competence of a witness means the mental capacity of the person to participate in legal proceedings.  However, the maximum use of competence is done in the industry where it has come to refer to specific requirements from an individual to perform a given job. 2
  3. 3. Three Levels of Competences 1. Core Competences – Organizational Level. An organization has to be good at various things such as customer orientation, producing high-quality goods or services, innovation, adding value through the effective use of resources and managing costs. 2. Generic Competences – Shared by group of similar jobs such as financial accountants, system analysts, team leader etc. 3. Role-specific competences- Unique to a particular role. 3
  4. 4. What is Competency?  Competency on the other hand, in industrial jargon, refers to description of skills and knowledge along with experience, behaviour and other attributes that are necessary to perform a task or job.  In simple words, competencies are skills required for a job. Thus when you are shown competencies, it means you have been described what has to be done and how well. 4
  5. 5. Behaviour Classification  Understanding what needs to be done.  Getting the job done.  Taking people with you. 5
  6. 6. Competence Analysis  Competence is about what people have to do to achieve results and it is not about how they do it.  Answers to the following questions are to be obtained to do the analysis:-  What are the elements of this job – what does the job-holder have to do?  For each element, what is an acceptable standard of performance?  What levels and types of knowledge and skills are required to ensure that the job-holder is fully capable in each element of the job?  How will role-holders and their managers know that the required levels of competence have been achieved? 6
  7. 7. Competence Analysis at Southern Focus Trust  Core Competences were: 1. Provide quality service. 2. Manage the business and provision of services effectively. 3. Ensure that accountabilities are defined, accepted and fulfilled. 4. Acquire, develop and use professional expertise to deliver services. 5. Develop and apply interpersonal skills to achieve aims and standards and to comply with the Trust’s core values. 7
  8. 8. Competency Analysis  It is concerned with the behavioural dimensions of roles which considers what people have to do to perform well.  How do people in this role behave when they carry it out effectively or ineffectively?  The answer to the above question will help us define the competencies and differentiate the positive and negative sets of behaviour. 8
  9. 9. Approaches to Competency Analysis 1. Expert opinion  Least satisfactory.  HR department experts make a list of ‘what counts’.  Line managers and job-holders no involved and thus the list is unacceptable. 2. Structured interview  Expert prepare a list of competence headings.  Take interviews to sought effective and ineffective behaviours in different areas.  Should instead take interviews first and then group specific types of behaviour under competence headings. 3. Workshops  Bring together expert people in their fields along with a facilitator.  The members give examples of what kind of behaviour is effective and ineffective for a particular job. List down and group those competencies  E.g. Divisional HR director/Manager. 9
  10. 10. Approaches to Competency Analysis… 4. Functional analysis  Distinction made between tasks (activities) and functions (purpose). 5. Critical incident technique  Event – good or bad and Behaviour – effective or less effective.  Observe the behaviour. Make corrections if less effective behaviour. 6. Repertory grid analysis  Personal construct theory. Way we behave or view other people’s behaviour.  Procedure is known as ‘Triadic method of elicitation’. 7. Job competency assessment  David McClelland established 20 competencies and grouped them in 6 clusters.  Competency assessment method for generic roles which have same basic accountabilities. E.g. Research scientists or area sales manager.  Investigative interviews are taken. Information on ‘How they behave in their job, what are their thoughts and actions’ is gathered by trained interviewer.  Helps distinguish between superior performer and average performer. 10
  11. 11. Which Approach?  Critical incident and repertory – grid -> time consuming and needs experience to be effective.  Job competency assessment -> for those who have not got time or money to use any other approach.  Workshop -> best among all.  Functional analysis -> used when the main objective is to develop NVQ standards. 11
  12. 12. TŌMĀKĒ DHAN'YABĀDA 12

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