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Combining Art, Creativity and Industrial Simulations: Game-Based Tools for Learning and Instruction

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Games are fun, exciting and engaging but do they belong in the classroom? Can games and simulations be artistic, creative and still be educational? There is evidence that students participating in game-based learning experiences have higher declarative knowledge, procedural knowledge and retention of instructional material than those participating in more traditional learning experiences. But, what elements make games and simulations appropriate for learning and how can those elements be integrated into the classroom. This keynote discusses the careful blending of creativity, artistry and technology to create effective game-like simulations for learning.

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Combining Art, Creativity and Industrial Simulations: Game-Based Tools for Learning and Instruction

  1. 1. Combining Art, Creativity and Industrial Simulations: Game-Based Tools for Learning and Instruction By Karl M. Kapp Bloomsburg University Twitter: @kkapp
  2. 2. Google “Kapp Notes”
  3. 3. Agenda How have simulations/games changed? Are simulation/games educational? What elements make simulations/games effective? . Show me some examples. 1 2 3 4
  4. 4. Games 1.0 4 2 3
  5. 5. Games 1.0 4 3 Where is my opponent going to go next? In what direction should I try to move the ball? How will the ball bounce off the wall?
  6. 6. Games 2.0
  7. 7. Games 2.0 Should I shoot the aliens on the end or in the middle or all the bottom aliens first? How long do I have to shoot before an alien shoots at me? What is the pattern these aliens are following?
  8. 8. Games 3.0
  9. 10. Where do I explore first? What activities are of the most value? What must I do to achieve my goal?
  10. 11. Games 4.0
  11. 12. Games 4.0 What activities give me the most return for my efforts? Can I trust this person who wants to team with me to accomplish a goal?
  12. 13. Flippy wants to become friends with you. Do you want to add Flippy to your friend’s list. Games 4.0
  13. 14. 10,000 hours of Game play 13 hours of console games a week Digital divisions. Report by the Pew /Internet: Pew Internet & American Life . US Department of Commerce 87% of 8- to 17- year olds play video games at home.
  14. 15. Females play 5 hours a week of console games. They make up the majority of PC gamers at 63%. Almost 43% of the gamers are female and 26% of those females are over 18.
  15. 16. Games/ Simulations <ul><li>Promote Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Provide a challenge </li></ul><ul><li>Tell a Story </li></ul><ul><li>Provide Realistic/Instructive Feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Enticing Aesthetics </li></ul>
  16. 17. Which builds more confidence for on the job application of learned knowledge? Class room instruction. Simulation Game.
  17. 18. Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-based simulation games. Personnel Psychology . Simulation Game. 20% higher.
  18. 19. Percentages of Impact Sitzmann, T. (2011) A meta-analytic examination of the instructional effectiveness of computer-based simulation games. Personnel Psychology . Type of Knowledge/Retention % Higher Declarative 11% Procedural 14% Retention 9%
  19. 21. <ul><li>- Realistic simulators for contemporary </li></ul><ul><li>Leadership Training </li></ul><ul><li>- Integrate these games into leadership development </li></ul><ul><li>programs </li></ul><ul><li>- Attempt various leadership structures </li></ul><ul><li>Employees may make hundreds of leadership </li></ul><ul><li>decision an hour in a game </li></ul>Leadership’s Online Labs Harvard Business Review, May 2008
  20. 22. Provide a Challenge
  21. 23. Reach Oregon
  22. 24. Survive!
  23. 25. Find Carmen
  24. 26. Learn Geography
  25. 27. Tell a Story Bourne Conspiracy Video Game
  26. 29. Defense Intelligent Agency Training
  27. 30. America’s Army
  28. 32. Researchers have found that the human brain has a natural affinity for narrative construction. Yep, People tend to remember facts more accurately if they encounter them in a story rather than in a list. And they rate legal arguments as more convincing when built into narrative tales rather than on legal precedent.
  29. 33. Stories provide, context, meaning and purpose
  30. 34. Missile Command. Simple storyline: Missiles are falling and you must save your cities. Players can then imagine a nuclear war, aliens launching missiles, a moon base under attack, whatever they like in the context of the simple storyline.
  31. 35. Production – Players are producers, not just consumers, they are “ writers” not just “readers.” Even at its simplest level, players co-design games by the action they take and decision they make . James Paul Gee, University of Wisconsin-Madison
  32. 37. Provide Feedback
  33. 43. Enticing Aesthetics
  34. 44. Artwork and the “look and feel” of the game plays a major role in the overall design and enjoyment of a game.
  35. 45. Examples
  36. 49. http://msit.bloomu.edu/db10149/jobquest/TW_applet.html
  37. 54. http:// youtu.be/Y5ywMb6SeGc
  38. 55. Ultimate Blending
  39. 60. Summary How have simulations/games changed? Are simulation/games educational? What elements make simulations/games effective? . Show me some examples. 1 2 3 4

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