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Games, Gamification and Game-Thinking: Making a Impact with Learners

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Presentation highlighting elements of game thinking and thinking like a game designer presented in a story format.

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Games, Gamification and Game-Thinking: Making a Impact with Learners

  1. 1. You are a game designer at SuperGame Corporation which has hit some hard times lately.
  2. 2. It’s Friday 4:59 PM you and your colleague have only one thing on your mind.
  3. 3. Suddenly, your boss calls you and your colleague into her office. Ito and Jasmine come into my office.
  4. 4. Yes? Yes?
  5. 5. Look, someone wants us to create a game about capturing dragons. It appears to be a craze or something.
  6. 6. Working name is… “Dragónmon Go”
  7. 7. You are competing internally for the project. Winning team earns the right to work on the project.
  8. 8. Each team will be confronted with 3 questions. The team that correctly answers the most questions wins the work.
  9. 9. What about the other team?
  10. 10. Losers are assigned to the game “watching paint dry.”
  11. 11. Wow, I heard about that project, it’s almost as fun as… never mind. Dragon Capturing is much better.
  12. 12. Get it together. Now let’s hear about the dragon capturing game.
  13. 13. First decision…..
  14. 14. Tell player three things they need to know about capturing dragons. or Begin by having player start capturing dragons right away.
  15. 15. Begin by having player start capturing dragons right away. Application before mastery.
  16. 16. Why does this answer make sense? Not Sure?
  17. 17. Game designers know games are engaging because they require action right away.
  18. 18. Action draws in the player and encourages further engagement. Start by capturing a dragon.
  19. 19. Too often learning events are about content and not about action.
  20. 20. Game Design is about action!
  21. 21. Solve a mystery. Make the learners do something. Answer a question. Work a problem. Make a decision. Escape a room. Play a game.
  22. 22. Here is a testing example, half of a group of students had to re-read content, half had to answer quiz questions after only seeing the content for 4 minutes. Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C., Jonsson, B., & Nyberg, L. (2014). Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 55(1), 10–16. http://doi.org/10.1111/sjop.12093
  23. 23. Participants who had been tested (rather than re- reading the material) outperformed the other students on three tests. Wiklund-Hörnqvist, C., Jonsson, B., & Nyberg, L. (2014). Strengthening concept learning by repeated testing. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 55(1), 10–16. http://doi.org/10.1111/sjop.12093
  24. 24. Think like a game designer, think action.
  25. 25. OK, next decision. Provide map with locations of all the dragons. or Create a sense of mystery concerning location of the dragons.
  26. 26. It is a good idea to build curiosity and mystery into a game.
  27. 27. Reveal locations of dragons throughout the course of the player’s journey.
  28. 28. Check out my notebook on this subject.
  29. 29. A sense of suspense, mystery and intrigue draws people into games.
  30. 30. And it can draw people into learning as well.
  31. 31. Next question.
  32. 32. Should we make the game.. Easy or Challenging.
  33. 33. Jones, B., Valdez, G., Norakowski, J., & Rasmussen, C. (1994). Designing learning and technology for educational reform. North Central Regional Educational Laboratory. [Online]. Available: http://www.ncrtec.org/capacity/profile/profwww.htm and Schlechty, P. C. (1997). Inventing better schools: An action plan for educational reform. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Chapter 2 “The Gamification of Learning and Instruction.” It needs to be challenging.
  34. 34. Robert and Elizabeth Bjork. Create “Desirable Difficulty.”
  35. 35. Research indicates that our brains grow when we make a mistake because it is a time of struggle. Moser, J. Schroder, H.S., Heeter, C., C., Moran, T.P., & Lee, Y.H. (2011) Mind your errors: Evidence for a neural mechanism linking growth mindset to adaptive post error adjustments. Psychological Science, 22, 1284-1489.
  36. 36. Encourage the freedom to fail and the chance to struggle a bit in learning events.
  37. 37. It aids in learning and is motivational.
  38. 38. People are motivated when they have autonomy, mastery and relatedness.
  39. 39. Isn’t that Self-Determination Theory?
  40. 40. Why, yes…yes it is.
  41. 41. Sailer, J., Hense, J. U., Mayr, S. K., & Mandi, H. (2017) How gamification motivates: An experimental study of the effects of specific game design elements on psychological need satisfaction. Computers In Human Behavior. Pp. 371-380. The game elements of badges, leaderboards, and performance graphs positively impact mastery and task meaningfulness
  42. 42. The game elements of avatars, meaningful stories, and teammates affect experiences of social relatedness. Sailer, J., Hense, J. U., Mayr, S. K., & Mandi, H. (2017) How gamification motivates: An experimental study of the effects of specific game design elements on psychological need satisfaction. Computers In Human Behavior. Pp. 371-380.
  43. 43. Lot of information, thanks. So let me ask one more question.
  44. 44. Which team gets to design “Dragónmon Go”? Which team won?
  45. 45. Well, they are all winners to me.
  46. 46. Ugh….
  47. 47. Tips 1) Begin with activity 2) Create curiosity 3) Create challenge 4) Use game elements appropriately
  48. 48. Questions?

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