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SUMMARY DIALOG NASIONAL ID-IGF 2017 (ENGLISH)

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SUMMARY DIALOG NASIONAL ID-IGF 2017 (ENGLISH)

  1. 1. 96Modul Pengantar Tata Kelola Internet2 (Lanjut ke Halaman 8) THE INDONESIA NATIONAL DIALOGUE ID-IGF 2017 SUMMARY PLENARY “The National Dialogue for Indonesian Internet Governance Forum is an important part in a digital era, and it is therefore highly necessary to hold this kind of public discussion in a more regular basis. We expect to have more stakeholders joining and expressing their voices in the forum,” said the DG of Application and Informatics, Indonesian Ministry of Communication and Informatics, Semuel Abrijani Pangerapan, in the Plenary Meeting in the opening ceremony of the ID-IGF National Dialogue on 27 October 2017 held at Jakarta International Expo, Kemayoran. He also explained about some current discourses in the dialogue basket. Further, he expressed his hope that the discussion basket be added with political aspects (as in the present day of digital transformation era, many collisions taking place, which lead to the shifting of norms in the community), as well as ethics on proper technology utilization in digital era, so as to ensure that technology can be used maximally to improve the nation’s intellectual capacity. In accordance with the them of this event, which is Digital Transformation: Is Indonesia Ready?, Semuel also highlighted about the standards that Indonesia needs to apply. By considering the dynamics in digital sector, which involve various interests, whether in economic, legal, regulatory, infrastructure, as well as socio-cultural ones, it is expected that moving forward, other stakeholders who share the same passion and intention to discuss about standardization can sit together to establish a discussion forum on the relevant subject. It is also expected that the discussion outcomes can serve as recommendations to the government to be applied and put into a concrete framework. Digital Transformation, Does Indonesia Ready? “ “ www.igf.id 27 Oktober 2017, JIExpo Kemayoran, Jakarta The Urgency of Private Data Protection in Developing Indonesia’s Digital Economy ECONOMY Panelist (in alphabetical order): Helni M. Jumhur (Telkom University), Sherly Haristya (ICT Watch), Syafira Auliya (CIPG) Moderator: Lintang Setianti (ELSAM). Rapporteur: Leonardus K. Nugroho (ELSAM) EK #1 Private Data Protection Law is a critical element to achieve Indonesia 2020 vision. Many countries have realized about the importance of Private Data Protection, and therefore provide strong regulations, capable regulator, and privacy-literate community. For business entity, including MSME, consumer trust is key to business growth. Without any protection of private data, business growth, even in the international context (trade) will be hindered. However, many online business actors in Indonesia have not yet implemented private data protection policy. Some even divert this responsibility to consumers. At least three things need to be conducted: Regulatory framework: There needs to be strict definitions and limitations that can protect consumers without constraining innovation. Regulator: institution’s capacity in enforcing and punishing PDP violation needs to be enforced; and lastly, building community’s awareness. Although private data protection is not the only determinant factor to achieve Indonesia 2020 vision, it is elementary to foster and ensure the achievement of economic growth. (Go to page 8) 1
  2. 2. 97 Modul Pengantar Tata Kelola Internet Digital Transformation of the Expert Reference System/Knowledge Person Online - A Study/Exploration Panelist (in alphabetical order): Endang Djuano (Universitas Trisakti), Izmir Eka Putra (KADIN). Moderator: Tinuk Andriyanti Asianto (PANDI). Rapporteur: Laila Ayu Karlina (ICT Watch) In today’s digital era, there is a need to create a marketplace that offers transfer of knowledge and expert recommendation system. To develop such a system, transfer of knowledge has certain limits that need to be considered. An example of this is relating to private data. There should be clarity as to whether the data shared are ones that are allowed to be disclosed to public. To develop a specific marketplace for 2 INFRASTRUCTURE IS #1 transfer of knowledge, we need to conduct profiling on internet users. Currently, big companies have been profiling our data without us realizing it. It is time for us now to do the same for more positive purposes and for the benefit of the society. To ensure the smooth running of the transfer of knowledge marketplace, experts’ commitment and time become crucial. The development of transfer of knowledge marketplace can be started with specific things in accordance with our expertise and by taking into account our local wisdom, since ecosystem is indispensable to grow and develop such a system. LAW HK #1 Internet of Things: Connectivity, Productivity, Controlling, and Policy Model. The government needs to give proper responses to IOT in Indonesia. IOT is often associated with smart city, smart car, etc. All jobs in all sectors will be replaced by IOT, and thus all of the sectors must adapt to this change. For the safety of childdren in IOT, all parties hold equal responsibility and therefore must contribute, particularly by enhancing media literacy. An instance of this is by incorporating digital literacy into the curriculum. It’s the academics, researchers, business, industry, government, and community which create the innovations that will revitalize the nation’s economy. Panelist (in alphabetical order): Agus Pambagio (Policy Academic), Kanisius Karyono (Univ. Multimedia Nusantara). Moderator: Shita Laksmi (Diplo Foundation). Rapporteur: Alvidha S. (ID-IGF Secretariat) 2
  3. 3. 98Modul Pengantar Tata Kelola Internet SOCIAL SB #1 Indonesia’s Digital Literacy Roadmap Panelist (in alphabetical order): Ali Panjalu (TIK Volunteer), Ida Fajar Priyatno (Gadjah Mada University), Yuniyanti Chuzaifah (Komnas Perempuan). Moderator: Utami Haryadi (Univ. of Indonesia). Rapporteur: Yulis Asmin (Komnas HAM) Gadget use increases up to 142% of the population. Building digital literacy of the community means building a community that can focus more on circle of control, and care about their own need, rather than wasting time in the circle of concern. This must be started since early age with appropriate approaches. Internet blurs the meaning of primary and secondary needs: phone credit is considered more important than nutritious food (female students). Divorce rate increases along with the declining of private space and the high rate of cheating in cyber-world. Digital trace on the internet becomes a hot and unsolvable issue, particularly in Indonesia. The right to be forgotten needs to be deeply discussed as an individual is entitled to remove his/her past story, but at the same time, this right can also be taken advantage by a criminal to remove his/her track record. Women are the largest internet user, yet they still seriously lack digital literacy (related to privacy, benefit, etc.), and therefore digital literacy movement needs to particularly aim to increase women’s understanding on these aspects. SOCIAL SB #2 Digital Literacy Movement Panelist (in alphabetical order): Diena (GNLD Siberkreasi), Mustika Wati (Parliament Librarian), Wien Muldian (Ministry of Education and Culture). Moderator: Ade Farida (US Embassy) Rapporteur: Dhestari (Ministry of Law and HR) Hoax, cyberbullying, false news, and various other contents are still rampant in the cyber space. Victims are falling, despite the government’s efforts to protect its citizens by issuing various regulations. So intense and widespread are hoaxes that even false regulations are made by some to deter netizens from expressing their opinions. Libraries need regulations on literacy particularly at local level, since there is a lack of appreciation from the government or library community. The digital community’s position within the Indonesian society still needs to be improved, and this requires both the government and community’s roles themselves to conduct mapping on national literacy movement (school, community, culture, language and literature, family, one teacher one book). The National Literacy Movement must be able to mobilize all segments of society through positive digital contents. All elements of society must be engaged in a smart collaboration to utilize technology through literacy education. 3
  4. 4. 99 Modul Pengantar Tata Kelola Internet INFRASTRUCTURE IS #2 Neutral Network Operator Or Open Access Policy Various associations support evenly distribution of internet in Indonesia while maintaining neutrality. This network can actually create business opportunity for all existing providers. Panelist (in alphabetical order): Henry K. Soemartono (APJII), Joseph Lembayung (Bali Tower), Kanaka Hidayat (NEUSAT), Nonot Harsono (Mastel Institute), Thomas Dragono (PT. Mega Akses Perdana). Moderator: Bambang Sumaryo (ISOC Indonesia). Rapporteur: Pramirvan Datu (ISOC Indonesia) LAW HK #2 The Urgency of Governing Privacy Data: Balance between Technology Protection and Oversight Panelist (in alphabetical order): Dr. Sinta Dewi (Padjajaran University), Justi Kusumah (K&K Advocates), Semmy Pangerapan (KOMINFO RI), Wahyudi Djafar (ELSAM). Moderator: Miftah Fadhli (ELSAM) Rapporteur: Riska Carolina (ELSAM) The digital era is an era of transparency which must be understood by Indonesian society as a whole. It’s not only government’s affairs, but also community’s and business’s. Thus, a comprehensive law must be provided to protect the citizen’s freedom of expression. Therefore, it is reasonable to have laws that accommodate protection of private data (Law on Private Data Protection/PDP), since nowadays, data are a common good wanted by everyone, for data are power. There needs to be a roadmap for integration of Private Data Protection Law which complies with international standards, particularly of human rights, which involves various relevant actors, such as government, community, and business sectors, as well as the establishment of an independent body which can accommodate people’s aspiration. It is hoped that by next year, the Private Data Protection Law can be passed and enacted for our common good. With proper regulations from the government, the need for internet, and obligation for the society to learn sciences and technology with neutral concept, unhealthy business competition can be minimized. With fibre concept, we provide empty pipe by complementing and providing internet all across Indonesia. We shall have an equal distribution of bandwith without any intervention from giant providers. 4
  5. 5. 100Modul Pengantar Tata Kelola Internet Multinational Monopoly behind E-Commerce Agenda Panelist (in alphabetical order): Bhima Yudistira (INDEF), I Nyoman (Ministry of Communication and Informatics), Margiyono (Commissioner, Telkom), Olisias Gultom (IGJ). Moderator: Rachmi Hertanti (IGJ). Rapporteur: Maulana (IGJ) E-Commerce issue is a very complex issue, as it is not only associated with trade, but also digital world. Investment in e-commerce business startup is still dominated by foreign capital. Startups in Indonesia are predominantly e-commerce, which investment has reached billions, and they are also some of the most rapidly growing sectors. E-commerce in Indonesia has not reached 2%, and still below the US (5%), yet its value is tremendous. Foreign investment in the country is dominated by Japan, which constitutes 63% of the total foreign investment. E-commerce will bring some influences on free trade. There is yet any national consensus on the matter, and not event the government has any particular perspective on how to respond to e-commerce. Companies’ values shifted, from the previously commodity-based one to the digital one. Digital economy is fairly high in value, yet unfortunately Indonesia has no sufficient technology as compared to other countries. In addition, there is also the issue of regulatory framework to tackle. One of the concerns around e-commerce is that it would cause cut-down of labors in various sectors, and that the digital economy, including e-money and e-commerce will only benefit the banking sector. There have been some regulations in Indonesia, and they are regularly improved, yet the technical implementation still needs to be promoted further. ECONOMY EK #2 Developing Infrastructure & People-based Digital Economy Panelists (in alphabetical order): Anang Latief (BP3TI),Bima Laga (idEA), Sofyan Lusa (Coordinating Ministry of Economic Affairs), Tjatur (Kumparan). Moderator: Indriyatno Banyumurti (ICT Watch). Rapporteur: Sherly Haristya (ICT Watch) The biggest challenge for Indonesia is on supporting small businesses, MSME and informal businesses (such as street vendors) as well as enhancing local production capacity. The Government of Indonesia has been working hard to enhance internet infrastructure in remote areas. The next challenge, then, is how to utilize the infrastructure for people’s welfare. Another challenge after internet and digital economy exist and run is to educate the community to become digital-literate in order to create inclusive economic growth and benefit. ECONOMY EK #3 In Open Mic session, with sub theme: Startup for the People and present 8 startups. They are Enda Nasution (1000 Startup Movement), Yekti Hesti (independent.id), Faldo Maldini (pulangkampuang. com), A. Ahmad Fauzi (Billion Apps), Luthfi Idiyono (tambo.co. id), Yosep Prayogi (tempo.co), Andika Firnanda (privatQ), M. Isa Iombu (selasar.com). The speakers of each startup are given 10 minutes of presentation in this session. In this open mic session, the core of the startup exposure is to promote digital technology where with the progress of the digital world and also the progress of infrastructure in the construction of the Internet better in Indonesia so that things become easier. These startups have been able to create jobs just by using the internet and digital advancement. Taking the same example mentioned by Mr. Semuel in the opening session, the development of startup for a growing online taxi service is only a matter of a few and with little capital to start. 5
  6. 6. 101 Modul Pengantar Tata Kelola Internet INFRASTRUCTURE IS #3 Preparing Human Resources for Digital Transformation Panelist (in alphabetical order): Edi Purwanto (Indotelko), Iin Mulyani (SMK Wikrama Bogor), Sofi Fachri (BNSP), Teguh Prasetya (MASTEL). Moderator: Yudho Giri Sucahyo (UI). Rapporteur: Osvan W (ISOC) In almost all sectors, Indonesian human resources lack the required competitiveness. Professional certification only became more intensive after the establishment of BNSP. Vocational school (SMK) graduates should normally serve at level 2 positions (example: operator), yet industrial sector of today requires the vocational schools to produce more competent graduates, which they try to achieve through a number of strategies, including digitization of education management, teacher internship in industry, internet support, reduce gap between skills taught at school and ones expected by industry. The largest challenge is to reduce skills gap between school and industrial need by preparing competent IT teachers. LSP bridges the human resources skills with industry’s need by creating competence standards/certification that are relevant to the need, and which are at the same level with the national and international standards of competence. One of the most important Indonesia Digital Inclusion Pillars is productive local content. Acceleration must be conducted in all pillars. In addition to telematics business with legal entity, individual telematics business sector also needs to be protected by regulations. Complaints from the community with regard to SMEs often revolve around the lack of competent human resources in information technology particularly at sub-national level. Thus, the government is hoped by many to provide support through trainings. Meanwhile, complaints from telco companies revolve around the hardship in recruiting capable human resources at sub-national/local level. The core mentioned by speakers in this session is the use of appropriate digital technologies, collaboration or collaboration and communication. Given the advancement of digital technology is closely related to the development of the internet, then the speakers try to invite the beginner or generation Z (younger than the millennial) to be able to put the potential of self in the use of digital and the internet itself. They explain that in the internet there are many things to know beyond just uploading and downloading that is the potential to look for bigger opportunities, for example displaying personal capabilities (such as writing, learning to develop applications, etc.) to be channeled and for self potential can reach public attention in internet to get to know us. And other things that are not less important is the perseverance and willingness to develop and continue to learn. SOCIAL SB #3 The Impact of Rapid and Vast Development of Digital Panelist (in alphabetical order): Nafi Putrawan (Cybers Group), Putu Lexman Pendit (RMIT University Australia), Ramya Prajna Sahisnu (Think.web). Moderator: Yulis Asmin (Komnas HAM) Rapporteur: Khairunnisa Fathonah (House of Regional Representatives/DPD-RI) Digital Literacy is our response to technology development, on how we use the media to support the community in literacy, as well as raise their interest to read. Digital literacy gap appears between men and women (risk: unsustainable digital economy), in offices (risk: low performance), in rural community (risk: uneven economic distribution), in SME (risk: low rate of adoption), and in productive age (risk: low absorption of labor). The gap between parents and children: poor communication, delinquent child, and prevalence of inaccurate information. What needs to be done: training on sorting out information, self-learning, and technology-use learning. 6
  7. 7. 102Modul Pengantar Tata Kelola Internet LAW HK #3 Intermediary’s Responsibility in the Utilization of Internet Technology: Indonesia’s Policy Direction Panelists (in alphabetical order): Adzkar Muhsinin (Senior Researcher, ELSAM), Dr. Sinta Dewi (Padjajaran Padjajaran), Semmy Pangerapan (Ministry of Communication and Informatics). Moderator: Wahyudi Djafar (ELSAM) Rapporteur: Riska Carolina (ELSAM) Contents are distributed by intermediaries who serve as access provider, storer, and transmitter from a third party. In human rights context, internet intermediary has an important role in the digital ecosystem. Corporate becomes a violator of human rights together with the state, and thus become relevant to be discussed in relation with the principles of business and human rights: that state is obliged to protect, and corporate is obliged to respect, human rights. There needs to be several responsibilities imposed on corporates that are exploitative, which are based on local parameters (localizing human rights) and other principles, depending on the state’s discretion. There is no age restriction in Indonesia, and yet there is a prohibition to maintain intermediaries’ liability order if there is no measure taken by the government. Article 40 paragraph 2a states about literacy that keeps going along with time. Thus, once literacy increases, prohibition and regulation will decrease. There needs to be a balance between protection and freedom of expression in developing a regulation. Startups shall possess awareness particularly pertaining to database in Indonesia, including by registering their electronic system to the Ministry of Communication and Informatics (Kominfo), applying business model that does not sell any private data, as well as having dedicated database officers responsible for consumer data. In the future, users should become more aware of any parties that commit violation, and take advantage of the legal association for private data protection. When private data is disclosed to public, the data becomes a public data. Thus, there needs to be a right to be forgotten, which is an individual’s right to demand to the data storage provider to remove access to their private information. The largest use of internet in Indonesia is for social media (97.4%), youtube, and e-commerce. Three pillars contribute to e-commerce transaction’s success: trust, security, and privacy. Indonesian society seems to remain unaware on which data are categorized as privacy that needs to be protected, and hence frequently gives consent without knowing what the data will be used for. In Indonesia, there is yet any law on private data protection, and therefore it is hoped that such a law can be prepared as soon as possible. Panelist (in alphabetical order): Debora Rosaria (bukalapak), Evandri Pantouw (Indexa Law), Mediodecci Lustarini (Ministry of Communication and Informatics), Miftah Fadhli (ELSAM). Moderator: Farhanah (KEMUDI). Rapporteur: Indriani Widyastuti (KEMUDI) YOUTH ID-IGF Terms and Conditions (Don’t) Apply In media arrangement context, there are the no-regulation, self-regulation, co- regulation, and direct-regulation principles. However, Indonesia doesn’t have yet any comprehensive regulation on third party’s responsibility. 7
  8. 8. 103 Modul Pengantar Tata Kelola Internet 8 NATIONAL DIALOGUE ID-IGF 2017 STATISTICS (Based on the list of participants) Total Participants: 477 (44%) 209 Female 268 (56%) Male Stakeholder Group: Student (35%):166 people Lecturer (10%): 46 people Government (16%): 77 people IT Community (9%): 44 people CSO (13%): 62 people Media (4%): 20 people Business Sector (13%): 62 people PLENARY In this opportunity, Semuel took as an example the development in digital technology by mentioning how some startups managed to grow and develop so quickly within few years to become a top-tier company, such as online taxi and e-commerce. Whereas, these companies, despite relying only on digital technology, succeeded in reviving and empowering the community’s potentials without the community itself needs to build its own company; in fact, the community now has shares (assets) in the online companies, and hence, the companies are steadily growing economically side-by- side with community empowerment. Despite a lot of resistances against this, particularly due to the absence of any regulations and laws that govern such businesses in details, it is still unavoidable; they are a logical consequence of the progress in digital technology. Thus, the government is expected to provide a clear legal umbrella and standardization for all the startups in order to keep innovation alive and preserved throughout its development. Meanwhile, Sanjaya as Deputy Director of General Asia Pacific Network Information Center (APNIC) also attended to this national dialogue representing the technical community. “Our goal of guarding this national dialogue is to keep it realistic. Because when discussing the internet, it must know how internet works. If you don’t know then it will floating” he said. According to Sanjaya about Indonesian internet, there are two things that we need to improve, which is access internet, where still 52% limited. And another thing is security and protection, which is very important to be addressed. Because if not, then people do not believe in digital transformation. Naveed Haq, as Regional Development Manager of the Internet Society of Asia Pacific (ISOC APAC) said that discussions like this also take place in other Asia Pacific countries. ISOC APAC is a global organization that also promotes policies that support universal access for all people around the world. Irwin Day as a member of the Multistakeholder Advisory Group (MAG) of the Indonesia Internet Governance Forum, stated that he strongly supports ID-IGF. Support is mainly due to agreed principles, such as openness, freedom of information flow and the management of democratic transparency by multistakeholders. Irwin wants all that involved are not to forget these principles even though the digital world of Indonesia has been transformed. 8 Panelist (in alphabetical order): Irwin Day (MAG), Naveed Haq (ISOC ASPAC), Sanjaya (APNIC). Moderator: Shita Laksmi (DIPLO)

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