Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
The Language of Leadership
Caroline Simard, PhD
Research Director
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Underrepresentation of women in
leadership
•  Approximately 4.5% of the F...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Bias: Cognitive Function
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Bias is an error
in decision making.
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Stereotypes are the content of bias
Stereotypes are generalized
beliefs a...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Stereotypes function as
“cognitive shortcuts.”
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
What are some of the stereotypes
about technologists?
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
How do we block bias?
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
“Recognize that we didn’t
create this, but we can fix it.”
Megan Smith
CT...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
We can debug processes
and block bias.
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
(Correll 2014; Goldin and Rouse, 2000)
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
(Correll 2014; Goldin and Rouse, 2000)
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Stereotypes affect the
standard we use to evaluate
the performance of ind...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
79% 49%
Brian Miller Karen Miller
Correll, 2013; Steinpreis, Anders & Rit...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Extra Scrutiny
“I would need to see evidence that she
had gotten these gr...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Stereotypes affect the
criteria we use to evaluate the
performance of ind...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
More education
Uhlmann & Cohen 2005
More experience
✔
© Stanford Universi...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
More education More experience
✔
© Stanford University 2014. All rights r...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
More experience More education
✔
© Stanford University 2014. All rights r...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
How do you see
the unseen?
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
The most common way that
we transmit and maintain
culture is through lang...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Language of Competence
Team player
Friendly
Good relationship manager
Com...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Language of Competence
c
Communal
Language
Agentic
Language
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Communal Agentic
Supportive
Team Player
Helpful
Friendly
Thoughtful
Colla...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
And finally, a special thank you
to Lori. You won't be surprised
to know ...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
And finally, a special thank you
to Lori. You won't be surprised
to know ...
Advocacy and Sponsorship to create
conditions for performance
Power of Introductions
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Rudman 1998
More
Competent
More
Competent
Less
likeable
✔
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Women who are seen as competent suffer a
likability penalty.
A woman who ...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Advocacy and Sponsorship
“No one leans in more than the
Clayman Institute...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Evaluation of Technical Competence in
Interviews
“Yeah, she can code, but...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Separate
style from the evaluation of
technical competence.
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Language of Technical Competence
Toolkit
1.  Separate Style from Technica...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Notice when
higher or different standards
are used to evaluate the
perfor...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Language of Technical Competence
Toolkit
1.  Separate Style from Technica...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
“Super Positive/Can Do attitude.
People enjoy working with (person).”
“(P...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
“Super Positive/Can Do attitude.
People enjoy working with (her).”
“(He) ...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Separate personality from
feedback and focus on
accomplishments.
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Language of Technical Competence
Toolkit
1.  Separate Style from Technica...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Criticism of Personality
“You can come across as
abrasive sometimes. I kn...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Critical Feedback (Personality/Style)
(Fortune, 2014)
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Activity
Write an introduction/advocacy statement for
a woman or for your...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
Action for tomorrow
Toolkit
1.  Write an introduction statement for yours...
© Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
What’s Next?
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

The Language of Leadership - Voices 2015

2,058 views

Published on

The Language of Leadership
Caroline Simard, Research Director at Clayman Institute for Gender Research at Stanford University

Voices 2015 www.globaltechwomen.com


Session Length: 1 Hour

Language can influence our perceptions of men and women, and the potential each has to lead. In this session, we discuss the language of leadership and the role bias can play in shaping different leadership outcomes for men and women. The session will offer strategies for individuals and managers to examine and sharpen their own voices and their advocacy of others, with an aim to advance women’s leadership and create effective organizations where all employees thrive.

Published in: Career
  • Be the first to comment

The Language of Leadership - Voices 2015

  1. 1. The Language of Leadership Caroline Simard, PhD Research Director
  2. 2. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Underrepresentation of women in leadership •  Approximately 4.5% of the Fortune 500 CEOs are women. •  Women hold 14% of executive officer positions. •  Women hold 18% of elected congressional offices. •  Women hold 17.2% of research university presidencies. •  Women of color are more underrepresented. Correll, 2014.
  3. 3. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Bias: Cognitive Function
  4. 4. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Bias is an error in decision making.
  5. 5. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Stereotypes are the content of bias Stereotypes are generalized beliefs about a particular group or class of people.
  6. 6. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Stereotypes function as “cognitive shortcuts.”
  7. 7. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. What are some of the stereotypes about technologists?
  8. 8. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. How do we block bias?
  9. 9. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. “Recognize that we didn’t create this, but we can fix it.” Megan Smith CTO, United States of America
  10. 10. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. We can debug processes and block bias.
  11. 11. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. (Correll 2014; Goldin and Rouse, 2000)
  12. 12. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. (Correll 2014; Goldin and Rouse, 2000)
  13. 13. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Stereotypes affect the standard we use to evaluate the performance of individuals.
  14. 14. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. 79% 49% Brian Miller Karen Miller Correll, 2013; Steinpreis, Anders & Ritzke 1999.
  15. 15. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Extra Scrutiny “I would need to see evidence that she had gotten these grants and publications on her own.” “It would be impossible to make such a judgment without teaching evaluations.” Correll, 2013; Steinpreis, Anders & Ritzke 1999.
  16. 16. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Stereotypes affect the criteria we use to evaluate the performance of individuals.
  17. 17. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. More education Uhlmann & Cohen 2005 More experience ✔ © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved.
  18. 18. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. More education More experience ✔ © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Uhlmann & Cohen 2005
  19. 19. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. More experience More education ✔ © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Uhlmann & Cohen 2005
  20. 20. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. How do you see the unseen?
  21. 21. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. The most common way that we transmit and maintain culture is through language.
  22. 22. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Language of Competence Team player Friendly Good relationship manager Committed Big thinker Influences others Takes risks Independent Description A Description B COMMUNAL AGENTIC
  23. 23. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Language of Competence c Communal Language Agentic Language
  24. 24. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Communal Agentic Supportive Team Player Helpful Friendly Thoughtful Collaborative Committed Caring Tactical Hardworking Relationship builder Confident Strategic Ambitious Outspoken Independent Risk-taker Entrepreneurial Driver Influential Go-getter Innovator
  25. 25. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. And finally, a special thank you to Lori. You won't be surprised to know that she threw herself into this project with tireless dedication, good spirits and the gentle touch that is needed to coordinate so many big personalities.
  26. 26. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. And finally, a special thank you to Lori. You won't be surprised to know that she threw herself into this project with tireless dedication, good spirits and the gentle touch that is needed to coordinate so many big personalities.
  27. 27. Advocacy and Sponsorship to create conditions for performance Power of Introductions
  28. 28. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Rudman 1998 More Competent More Competent Less likeable ✔
  29. 29. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Women who are seen as competent suffer a likability penalty. A woman who is successful in a stereotypically male job is seen as less likable, less attractive, less happy, and less socially desirable. Successful female managers are seen as more deceitful, pushy, selfish, and abrasive than successful male managers. The Double Bind Yoder and Schleicher, 1996; Heilman, et al, 2004
  30. 30. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Advocacy and Sponsorship “No one leans in more than the Clayman Institute. I have had the privilege and honor of working with Shelley and Lori. I believe strongly in leadership. I’ve never met better leaders. They believe in gender equality. They understand how you take academic research and make it apply. And they will stop at nothing to change this world. And it is an honor and a privilege to be able to partner with you.” Sheryl Sandberg
  31. 31. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Evaluation of Technical Competence in Interviews “Yeah, she can code, but she can’t convince me about her decisions.” “She asked a lot of questions. I can’t spend all my time babysitting her.”
  32. 32. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Separate style from the evaluation of technical competence.
  33. 33. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Language of Technical Competence Toolkit 1.  Separate Style from Technical Competence Technical Competence Cultural Fit & Style Coding ability Style: Ability to Convince
  34. 34. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Notice when higher or different standards are used to evaluate the performance of certain individuals.
  35. 35. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Language of Technical Competence Toolkit 1.  Separate Style from Technical Competence 2.  Notice Higher or Different Standards and Insist on Universal Application of Standards Technical Competence Cultural Fit & Style Coding ability Style: Ability to Convince Use this criteria for all candidates
  36. 36. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. “Super Positive/Can Do attitude. People enjoy working with (person).” “(Person) has created a forum which enables greater visibility and collaboration across the many complex initiatives in flight.”
  37. 37. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. “Super Positive/Can Do attitude. People enjoy working with (her).” “(He) has created a forum which enables greater visibility and collaboration across the many complex initiatives in flight.”
  38. 38. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Separate personality from feedback and focus on accomplishments.
  39. 39. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Language of Technical Competence Toolkit 1.  Separate Style from Technical Competence 2.  Notice Higher or Different Standards and Insist on Universal Application of Standards 3.  Separate Personality from Feedback and Focus on Accomplishments
  40. 40. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Criticism of Personality “You can come across as abrasive sometimes. I know you don’t mean to, but you need to pay attention to your tone.” (Fortune 2014) © Lori Mackenzie 2015. All rights reserved.
  41. 41. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Critical Feedback (Personality/Style) (Fortune, 2014)
  42. 42. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Activity Write an introduction/advocacy statement for a woman or for yourself. •  Pay attention to the language of competence and technical competence. •  Focus on accomplishments and expertise.
  43. 43. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. Action for tomorrow Toolkit 1.  Write an introduction statement for yourself using balanced language 2.  Advocate on other women’s behalf using the language of leadership 3.  Block Undue Criticism of Women’s Personality 4.  Establish Clear Criteria in evaluating talent
  44. 44. © Stanford University 2014. All rights reserved. What’s Next?

×