Oecd reviews of vocational education and training, johannesburg south africa, 29 january 2014

1,985 views

Published on

More than 30 country studies published since 2007. More than 5000 policy makers, employers, teachers, trade unionists, students and experts interviewed. OECD reviews have become a global benchmarking standard for vocational education and training systems.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,985
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
83
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
101
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • We have got data from a good group of countries in this first report…
  • We have got data from a good group of countries in this first report…
  • Oecd reviews of vocational education and training, johannesburg south africa, 29 january 2014

    1. 1. OECD reviews of vocational education and training Simon Field OECD Johannesburg, South Africa 29 January 2014 www.oecd.org/education/VET 1
    2. 2. OECD reviews of vocational education and training 2
    3. 3. OECD reviews of vocational education and training More than 30 country studies published since 2007 More than 5000 policy makers, employers, teachers, trade unionists, students and experts interviewed OECD reviews have become a global benchmarking standard for vocational education and training systems. 3
    4. 4. 4
    5. 5. The big challenge: two separate worlds 5
    6. 6. 1: Tunisia: workbased learning • Benefits of workbased learning still often under-recognised • Best if systematic, mandatory, credit-bearing and quality assured. • Countries have shown they can achieve this, even in a weak labour market – Tunisia. • A powerful tool to promote partnership between training providers and employers 6
    7. 7. 2: Sweden: higher vocational education • Funding stream provides for programmes over 1-2 years run in partnership between training providers and employers. • Programmes include a substantial period of workbased learning for all students. • Has proven successful in a context where there is limited history of employer engagement. 7
    8. 8. 3 China: developing leadership in training institutions • Increasing prominence of leadership issues has accompanied attempts to give more flexibilities to institutions – eg UK further education. • More emphasis on institutional partnership with employers has changed the role of leaders. • In China, teacher internships in the strongest training institutions and in industry. 8
    9. 9. 4 Washington State, US: linking numeracy and literacy to vocational training. • Much discussion of ‘contextual learning’ but limited good evidence • IBEST model backed by good research • It is more expensive than other vocational programmes but it also has better results. 9
    10. 10. 5: Romania: Local flexibility in the curriculum • Many advantages in having national qualifications, consistent across the country • But they do limit the capacity to work with local employers. • In Romania, local training providers, working within a national qualification, adapt 20% of the curriculum to local needs. 10
    11. 11. 6 Australia: destinations surveys • Labour market outcomes are the key test of programme value, but sometimes data are weak. • In Australia, graduates are surveyed after leaving the programme. • Provides information about labour market outcomes, but also perceptions of programme value. 11
    12. 12. • Vocational provision developed in a partnership between government, employers and unions. • High quality apprenticeship systems, covering a wide range of professional domains and including higher level apprenticeships. • Work-based learning systematically integrated into all vocational programmes. • Measures to ensure that the mix of vocational provision corresponds to the needs of the labour market. • Adequate core academic skills, particularly literacy and numeracy, built into vocational programmes. • Effective, independent, proactive career guidance backed by solid career information. • A vocational teaching workforce containing a balance of teaching skills and up-todate industry knowledge and experience. • A range of programmes that provide inclusive opportunities for all, and minimise drop-out. • Qualifications reflecting labour market needs that are nationally consistent but allow for a locally negotiated element. • Avenues of progression from initial vocational programmes to both higher level vocational and academic programmes. • Provision suitable to adults with working and home commitments. • Better data on vocational programmes at all levels, covering both the identification of vocational programmes in international categorisations, and labour market outcomes. 12
    13. 13. Thank you! Simon.field@oecd.org . www.oecd.org/education/VET 13

    ×