The Community Joins In: Library Makerspaces

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Presentation given by:
Michelle Cooper, Henderson High School
Justin Hoenke, Chattanooga Public Library
Amy Koester, St. Charles City County Library District

At the 2013 Library Journal/School Library Journal event THE DIGITAL SHIFT: Reinventing Libraries
http://www.thedigitalshift.com/reinventinglibraries/program/

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  • Making for kids dates back to the first storytime crafts. Kids got supplies and were given time to create. Voila--making!
    Making for kids in the library space has become more and more relevant in previous years as a positive addition to a community. Schools are cutting “special” classes like art, sewing, and woodshop. Classroom subjects that may have provided space for making in the past--science with its experiments and inventions, history with its creative dioramas--nwo have little to no space for hands-on exploration and making. The rigid requirements for schools and students across the country have forced out time for kids to be makers. The library is poised to fill that void in a manner that stimulates children’s creativity and problem-solving and promotes a love of the library.
  • Making in children’s programming doesn’t necessitate a high level of staff expertise, and it doesn’t require expensive equipment. These things are great, of course--it would be awesome to help make a wooden boat with a skilled craftsman--but not vital to a positive maker experience for kids.
    What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • Making in children’s programming doesn’t necessitate a high level of staff expertise, and it doesn’t require expensive equipment. These things are great, of course--it would be awesome to help make a wooden boat with a skilled craftsman--but not vital to a positive maker experience for kids.
    What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • Making in children’s programming doesn’t necessitate a high level of staff expertise, and it doesn’t require expensive equipment. These things are great, of course--it would be awesome to help make a wooden boat with a skilled craftsman--but not vital to a positive maker experience for kids.
    What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • Making in children’s programming doesn’t necessitate a high level of staff expertise, and it doesn’t require expensive equipment. These things are great, of course--it would be awesome to help make a wooden boat with a skilled craftsman--but not vital to a positive maker experience for kids.
    What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • Making in children’s programming doesn’t necessitate a high level of staff expertise, and it doesn’t require expensive equipment. These things are great, of course--it would be awesome to help make a wooden boat with a skilled craftsman--but not vital to a positive maker experience for kids.
    What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • All of these programs are highly modifiable, and that’s the point. Just as there’s no single correct way to build a gingerbread house--there’s a basic framework with infinite possibilities--there’s no one way to offer maker programs for children.
  • All of these programs are highly modifiable, and that’s the point. Just as there’s no single correct way to build a gingerbread house--there’s a basic framework with infinite possibilities--there’s no one way to offer maker programs for children.
  • All of these programs are highly modifiable, and that’s the point. Just as there’s no single correct way to build a gingerbread house--there’s a basic framework with infinite possibilities--there’s no one way to offer maker programs for children.
  • All of these programs are highly modifiable, and that’s the point. Just as there’s no single correct way to build a gingerbread house--there’s a basic framework with infinite possibilities--there’s no one way to offer maker programs for children.
  • Neither of us have everything we need.
    How do we get it?
    We work together
  • The first step for libraries is to understand what our community wants.
    We need to talk to them
    We need to provide services that put the community first (responsive collections, programs aimed at community issues)
  • The community also needs to play an active role. Individuals and groups need to provide their talents, ideas, and resources to the library to make bigger things happen.
  • The community has access resources. The community wants to grow
    The word “library” is heavy. You say it and it elicits a reaction. We have a strong history and an even brighter future. People want to be involved with us.
  • Let’s talk about DEV DEV
    What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • Ta
  • What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • What does matter:
    Offering open-ended activities--Activities with rigid rules and product outcomes don’t promote creativity in the same way that open-ended activities do. Opt for programs that allow children to interact in multiple ways at their own pace.
    Variety of supplies--Having a variety of tools and supplies for children to use in a program promotes the maker philosophy in two ways: 1) it encourages exploration of materials, and 2) it promotes inventive, child-directed creation
    Plenty of time--Most adults couldn’t whip out a scarf in a 45-minute knitting-for-beginners program; why should we diminish kids’ ability to engage in making by imposing too-short time limits? Plan to keep a space open for a good chunk of time.
    Display space--Not a total necessity, but having a display space where children can elect to temporarily display creations is a great thing to offer. It gives kids a sense of pride in their hard work, they feel invested in the library, and the creations draw others’ attention to your programs.
  • The Community Joins In: Library Makerspaces

    1. 1. The Community Joins In: Library Maker Spaces Moderator/Presenter: Justin Hoenke, Chattanooga Public Library Presenters: Michelle Cooper, Henderson High School Amy Koester, St. Charles City-County Library District Image from Flickr user Repoort, creative commons licensed
    2. 2. Makers in the Children’s Room The Maker Movement Finds its Roots Amy Koester Children’s Librarian St. Charles City-County Library District akoester@stchlibrary.org @amyeileenk
    3. 3. Kids have been makers forever...
    4. 4. The Maker Philosophy in Children’s Programs +
    5. 5. The Maker Philosophy in Children’s Programs open-ended activities +
    6. 6. The Maker Philosophy in Children’s Programs open-ended activities variety of supplies +
    7. 7. The Maker Philosophy in Children’s Programs open-ended activities variety of supplies + plenty of time
    8. 8. The Maker Philosophy in Children’s Programs open-ended activities variety of supplies + plenty of time display space
    9. 9. Children’s Maker Programs LEGO Club
    10. 10. Children’s Maker Programs Gingerbread Workshop
    11. 11. Children’s Maker Programs Holiday Cardmaking
    12. 12. Children’s Maker Programs Marble Run Mania
    13. 13. Teen Makerspaces Michelle Cooper Librarian Henderson High School Henderson, Texas mcooper@hendersonisd.org @_michellecooper
    14. 14. Facility to Host Event Facility to H ost Event
    15. 15. Volunteers
    16. 16. Origam i Mus ic Art Storyte Legos lling Culinar y Arts Anythin g you c an imag ine, yo u can c reate!
    17. 17. Get Sponsorships!
    18. 18. Time Help Supplies Cost Activities How much fun did everyone have?
    19. 19. THE COMMUNITY JOINS IN: PARTNERSHIPS Justin Hoenke Teen Librarian Chattanooga Public Library @justinlibrarian @2ndfloorchatt
    20. 20. LIBRARIES AND COMMUNITIES NEED TO SUPPORT EACH OTHER
    21. 21. LIBRARIES NEED TO UNDERSTAND WHAT THE COMMUNITY WANTS
    22. 22. THE COMMUNITY NEEDS TO SUPPORT THE LIBRARY THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS
    23. 23. LIBRARIES HAVE AN AUDIENCE THE WORD LIBRARY CARRIES A LOT OF WEIGHT LIBRARIES HAVE THE SPACE THE COMMUNITY HAS THE CONNECTIONS THE COMMUNITY WANTS TO GROW THE COMMUNITY HAS THE RESOURCES
    24. 24. PARTNER
    25. 25. Questions? the conversation online: Join nke | @justinlibrarian Justin Hoe r oper | @_michellecoope Michelle Co Koester | @amyeileenk Amy Image from Flickr user Eleaf, creative commons licensed
    26. 26. Head over to: og post justinthelibrarian.com for our bl Resources on Pinterest p://goo.gl/m1B0Bk htt Image from Flickr user Eleaf, creative commons licensed

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