CWAA ― Urban Water Sustainability Leadership Conference October 4, 2011 Lessons Learned from Green Infrastructure (GI) Pro...
Overview <ul><li>Seattle and Seattle’s  Green Infrastructure (GI) Program  </li></ul><ul><li>GI in the Right-of-Way </li><...
Presented by:  Nancy Ahern, Deputy Director, Seattle Public Utilities Seattle Public Utilities and Seattle’s Green Infrast...
<ul><li>Water   Supply </li></ul>
<ul><li>Manage Solid Waste </li></ul>
<ul><li>Urban Drainage and Wastewater </li></ul>
Seattle’s Drainage and Wastewater System <ul><li>System Drivers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) and S...
Green Stormwater Infrastructure <ul><li>Integrating into Capital and O&M Programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyzed cost/perf...
Why Include GI in the Urban Drainage Strategy? <ul><li>Citizen interest:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alternative for right-of-w...
Natural Drainage Systems Building GI Experience and Knowledge Project Project Drainage Area SEA Street #1 2.3 acres NW 110...
SPU CSO System <ul><li>90 permitted CSO outfalls </li></ul><ul><ul><li>37 CSO outfalls do not meet CSO requirements </li><...
History Sets Context for CSO Control  May 4, 2010 - Meeting No. 1
CSO Control Approaches CSO Control Relative Cost Range  per gallon <ul><li>Green Stormwater Infrastructure </li></ul>$2.50...
CSO Reduction: Leading with Green <ul><li>Private parcels: RainWise </li></ul><ul><li>Alleys: Retrofitted with  permeable ...
CSO Compliance with Anticipated  Consent Decree Big Pipe Photo Solutions Grey Green
Presented by:  Tracy Tackett, Green Stormwater Infrastructure Program Manager, Seattle Public Utilities  GI in the Right-o...
Public Rights-of-Ways and Roadside  Rain Gardens
Potential Seattle & King County Joint GI Implementation Potential Right-of-way  Bioretention or Permeable Pavement Seattle...
Green is Not Always the Silver Bullet
Public Sensitivities to Roadside Rain Gardens <ul><li>Reduction in parking availability </li></ul><ul><li>Perceived safety...
Raingardens not exactly to scale. Parking: How big is a Rain Garden?
Policy: Is Participation Voluntary vs. Mandatory?
Sensitivities to GI Challenges with Developers or Other Departments <ul><ul><li>Competing needs for space </li></ul></ul><...
Citywide Policy <ul><ul><li>What is financial feasibility? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is parking higher or lower priority ...
Has your agency had any push back for adoption of green practices in the ROW?  Examples? <ul><li>Discussion Question: </li...
Presented by:  Jennifer Price, Program Manager, CH2M HILL Public Involvement to Maximize Success
<ul><li>Manage expectations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show interim conditions  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule and adaptat...
Getting to Informed Consent on GI Projects <ul><li>Engage vs. inform </li></ul><ul><li>Early and often in process </li></u...
 
Revised Public Involvement Process for  GI Projects <ul><li>Introduce CSO problem and solutions by leading with RainWise <...
GI Project Timeline Feasibility Analysis Internal Site Visits Identify Stakeholders and Policies Update Basin Specific Out...
GI Project Timeline Design Electronic or Mail Communication Revise Scenarios 5% Site Plan 2-3 Scenarios Status Updates <ul...
What strategies or approaches have you used to gain acceptance of a Green Infrastructure project? <ul><li>Discussion Quest...
Presented by:  Peg Staeheli, Principal, SvR Design Company Strategies  for Multiple Benefits
The quest:  How to get more benefit from our public infrastructure investments
Permitting Maintenance Finance Taxes/Bonds Local / State/ Federal Private Planning Policy Government Development Pattern P...
Multi-Benefit Solutions- Looking at the Systems
GI for CSO Reduction and More Stormwater  Goals via Stormwater Code CSO Reduction Bioretention/ Rain Garden Permeable Pave...
Some Examples: How GI Gets You More <ul><li>Significant reduction in total stormwater volume </li></ul><ul><li>Increased a...
Yale Street Private Development
 
Bell Street Park From SEAstreet to People Place Bringing it all Together
 
THREE MOVES: reclaim. elevate. mix. www.depave.org
water section: down garden
 
Winslow Way, Bainbridge Island, WA
Winslow Way, Bainbridge Island Strategies for the Multifunctional Street
<ul><li>Ensuring walkable space </li></ul><ul><li>Using Bioretention in several forms with enhanced landscape </li></ul><u...
 
GI into Northgate Area Comprehensive Planning “ transforming the center’s underutilized, auto-oriented office/retail area ...
 
Northgate Mall, Seattle WA 2007- 2011
Seattle Public Utilities partnered with the Seattle Department of Planning & Development  Result: Client Assistance  Memo ...
High Point Seattle High Point- SPU’s Successful GI Implementation 2001-2011
 
How does your agency involve other departments (from Planning through Inspection) in your planning and implementation for ...
Thank You
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Lessons learned from green infrastructure project experience in developing code requirements and community engagement

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Seattle's decade of experience installing Green Infrastructure (GI) projects has provided a substantial knowledge base. Two key areas of growth will be discussed: 1) Key policy issues in the development of the Seattle's Stormwater Code requirement for use of GI to the “maximum extent feasible” for projects on private property and right-of-way, and 2) public engagement success, failures, and proposed approach in moving forward in installing GI in public and private places, including a look at using GI to assist with combined sewer overflows.

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Lessons learned from green infrastructure project experience in developing code requirements and community engagement

  1. 1. CWAA ― Urban Water Sustainability Leadership Conference October 4, 2011 Lessons Learned from Green Infrastructure (GI) Project Experience in Developing Code Requirements and Community Engagement
  2. 2. Overview <ul><li>Seattle and Seattle’s Green Infrastructure (GI) Program </li></ul><ul><li>GI in the Right-of-Way </li></ul><ul><li>Public Involvement to Maximize Success </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies for Multiple Benefits </li></ul>
  3. 3. Presented by: Nancy Ahern, Deputy Director, Seattle Public Utilities Seattle Public Utilities and Seattle’s Green Infrastructure Program
  4. 4. <ul><li>Water Supply </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Manage Solid Waste </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>Urban Drainage and Wastewater </li></ul>
  7. 7. Seattle’s Drainage and Wastewater System <ul><li>System Drivers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) and Stormwater Permit Compliance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sediment cleanup </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Urban flooding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water quality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creek habitat </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Climate change </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Green Stormwater Infrastructure <ul><li>Integrating into Capital and O&M Programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Analyzed cost/performance of parcel and ROW based strategies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Used that analysis in planning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have retrofit 232-acres of Seattle’s creek watersheds to date </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Incorporation into Code </li></ul><ul><ul><li>New development must use GI </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Incorporation into Rate Structure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rate credits for impervious area managed </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Why Include GI in the Urban Drainage Strategy? <ul><li>Citizen interest: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Alternative for right-of-way improvements for informal areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reducing environmental impacts on Seattle’s receiving water bodies </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Providing ratepayers cost-effective solutions that maximize social and environmental benefits </li></ul><ul><li>Helps toward other City goals </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2030 Challenge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Seattle reLeaf </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Natural Drainage Systems Building GI Experience and Knowledge Project Project Drainage Area SEA Street #1 2.3 acres NW 110 th Cascade 28 acres Broadview Green Grid 32 acres Pinehurst Green Grid 49 acres High Point 129 acres
  11. 11. SPU CSO System <ul><li>90 permitted CSO outfalls </li></ul><ul><ul><li>37 CSO outfalls do not meet CSO requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><li>35 CSO storage facilities (8.1 MG) </li></ul><ul><li>100-200 million gallons CSO discharged annually </li></ul><ul><li>About 200 CSO discharge events annually </li></ul><ul><li>Integration with King County </li></ul>
  12. 12. History Sets Context for CSO Control May 4, 2010 - Meeting No. 1
  13. 13. CSO Control Approaches CSO Control Relative Cost Range per gallon <ul><li>Green Stormwater Infrastructure </li></ul>$2.50 to $22 <ul><li>System Retrofits </li></ul>$1 to $2 <ul><li>Infiltration/Inflow </li></ul>$30 to $32 <ul><li>Flow Transfer </li></ul>site specific <ul><li>Wet Weather Storage </li></ul>$12 to $40 <ul><li>Wet Weather Treatment </li></ul>$8 to $25
  14. 14. CSO Reduction: Leading with Green <ul><li>Private parcels: RainWise </li></ul><ul><li>Alleys: Retrofitted with permeable pavement </li></ul><ul><li>Roadways: Retrofitted with roadside rain gardens </li></ul>Photos Courtesy of T. Tackett (SPU)
  15. 15. CSO Compliance with Anticipated Consent Decree Big Pipe Photo Solutions Grey Green
  16. 16. Presented by: Tracy Tackett, Green Stormwater Infrastructure Program Manager, Seattle Public Utilities GI in the Right-of-Way
  17. 17. Public Rights-of-Ways and Roadside Rain Gardens
  18. 18. Potential Seattle & King County Joint GI Implementation Potential Right-of-way Bioretention or Permeable Pavement Seattle CSO Basins King County CSO Basins City Boundary *All KC and SPU uncontrolled basins are under consideration for RainWise
  19. 19. Green is Not Always the Silver Bullet
  20. 20. Public Sensitivities to Roadside Rain Gardens <ul><li>Reduction in parking availability </li></ul><ul><li>Perceived safety issues </li></ul><ul><li>Change in neighborhood aesthetics </li></ul><ul><li>Resistance to any changes </li></ul><ul><li>O&M concerns </li></ul>
  21. 21. Raingardens not exactly to scale. Parking: How big is a Rain Garden?
  22. 22. Policy: Is Participation Voluntary vs. Mandatory?
  23. 23. Sensitivities to GI Challenges with Developers or Other Departments <ul><ul><li>Competing needs for space </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Change in desired aesthetic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Citywide Policy <ul><ul><li>What is financial feasibility? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is parking higher or lower priority than stormwater goals? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is our risk tolerance? </li></ul></ul>
  25. 25. Has your agency had any push back for adoption of green practices in the ROW? Examples? <ul><li>Discussion Question: </li></ul>
  26. 26. Presented by: Jennifer Price, Program Manager, CH2M HILL Public Involvement to Maximize Success
  27. 27. <ul><li>Manage expectations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Show interim conditions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schedule and adaptation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Community concerns are specific </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Curb and gutter vs. unimproved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Importance of street character </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Duration of residence matters </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Don’t rely on community meetings alone </li></ul>Lessons Learned from the Ballard Community
  28. 28. Getting to Informed Consent on GI Projects <ul><li>Engage vs. inform </li></ul><ul><li>Early and often in process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Meaningful engagement for residents in siting and design </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Transparent decision processes </li></ul><ul><li>Find common ground </li></ul><ul><li>Inform about O&M levels of service </li></ul>
  29. 30.
  30. 31. Revised Public Involvement Process for GI Projects <ul><li>Introduce CSO problem and solutions by leading with RainWise </li></ul><ul><li>Use design visualization to demonstrate why GI is a good solution </li></ul><ul><li>Identify all potential stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain consistent communications </li></ul><ul><li>Engage stakeholders in multiple benefits </li></ul>
  31. 32. GI Project Timeline Feasibility Analysis Internal Site Visits Identify Stakeholders and Policies Update Basin Specific Outreach Plan Field/Site Specific Feasibility Modeling and BMP Sizing <ul><li>Interactive Workshop </li></ul><ul><li>Project purpose and need </li></ul><ul><li>Criteria for selection </li></ul>Finalize Communications Plan Concept Analysis And Scenario Building <ul><li>Initial Communications </li></ul><ul><li>Community Briefings </li></ul><ul><li>Stakeholder Interviews </li></ul><ul><li>Personalized mailing </li></ul><ul><li>CSO Community Council </li></ul>2-3 months Project Initiation Preliminary Evaluation of Alternatives 3-4 months RainWise Marketing Project Management Public Communications
  32. 33. GI Project Timeline Design Electronic or Mail Communication Revise Scenarios 5% Site Plan 2-3 Scenarios Status Updates <ul><li>Interactive Workshop </li></ul><ul><li>Selected streets </li></ul><ul><li>Design input </li></ul>Electronic or Mail Communication CSO Community Council Meeting Council Briefing Select Option Project Approval Revisit Technical Feasibility as Needed 6 months minimum Detailed Evaluation of Alternatives Design One-on-one Outreach to address concerns On-Site Walks-and-Talks CSO Community Council Meeting <ul><li>Interactive Workshop </li></ul><ul><li>Design input </li></ul>Communications Plan Update Project Management Public Communications 1+ years
  33. 34. What strategies or approaches have you used to gain acceptance of a Green Infrastructure project? <ul><li>Discussion Question: </li></ul>
  34. 35. Presented by: Peg Staeheli, Principal, SvR Design Company Strategies for Multiple Benefits
  35. 36. The quest: How to get more benefit from our public infrastructure investments
  36. 37. Permitting Maintenance Finance Taxes/Bonds Local / State/ Federal Private Planning Policy Government Development Pattern Public/Private Delivery Public Crews Private Contract Volunteers Local State Federal Departmental Partners in Process Construction Traditional Alternative Involve Collaborate Communicate
  37. 38. Multi-Benefit Solutions- Looking at the Systems
  38. 39. GI for CSO Reduction and More Stormwater Goals via Stormwater Code CSO Reduction Bioretention/ Rain Garden Permeable Pavement Rainwater Harvesting/ Detention Cistern Trees Greenroofs
  39. 40. Some Examples: How GI Gets You More <ul><li>Significant reduction in total stormwater volume </li></ul><ul><li>Increased awareness about stormwater and impacts </li></ul><ul><li>Increased green space (increased walkability, increased habitat) </li></ul>
  40. 41. Yale Street Private Development
  41. 43. Bell Street Park From SEAstreet to People Place Bringing it all Together
  42. 45. THREE MOVES: reclaim. elevate. mix. www.depave.org
  43. 46. water section: down garden
  44. 48. Winslow Way, Bainbridge Island, WA
  45. 49. Winslow Way, Bainbridge Island Strategies for the Multifunctional Street
  46. 50. <ul><li>Ensuring walkable space </li></ul><ul><li>Using Bioretention in several forms with enhanced landscape </li></ul><ul><li>Permeable pavement – strategic use </li></ul><ul><li>Manufactured systems when space is tight </li></ul><ul><li>Retaining mature tree canopy </li></ul><ul><li>Additional Trees </li></ul>
  47. 52. GI into Northgate Area Comprehensive Planning “ transforming the center’s underutilized, auto-oriented office/retail area into a higher intensity mix of office, retail, and housing … emphasis has been placed on creating new public plazas and parks, and on restoring degraded environmental features .”
  48. 54. Northgate Mall, Seattle WA 2007- 2011
  49. 55. Seattle Public Utilities partnered with the Seattle Department of Planning & Development Result: Client Assistance Memo – CAM515 extending the strategy beyond a single project
  50. 56. High Point Seattle High Point- SPU’s Successful GI Implementation 2001-2011
  51. 58. How does your agency involve other departments (from Planning through Inspection) in your planning and implementation for Green Infrastructure? Discussion Question:
  52. 59. Thank You

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