SOPAA saidWot Case Study        Stop Online Piracy Act9 – 18 January 2012Based on English mentionsonly.
"It’s a dangerous and troubling development when   the platforms that serve as gateways to informationintentionally skew t...
How one legislative act can impact the       Internet as we know it
Facts & Figures   This Case Study is based on comments received from the 9th of       January until the protest commenced ...
How many people were talking?        Over a period of 10     days,             we tracked more than 2 112 000 comments abo...
How many people were talking? At its peak 11 000 English mentions      were posted every 5 minutes
What was said?
Where did the conversation take place?   99% on Social  Media Platforms                      1.48% of the coverage was    ...
Where in the social media landscape?                     85%                                                              ...
Who was listening?
How much was it worth?            6 192 545 251 people.      were potentially exposed to comments and                opini...
Detractors  Commentary was negative and mainly encouragedpeople to join the protests along with Reddit,   Wikipedia,      ...
Creativity             Protests took on a creative form
Avatars    Avatars on Twitter were changed and hashtags                were used incessantly
Memes And humour was used to spread the message even                    further
Protests               A list of SOPA supporters was released (and             tweeted), further encouraging the boycott o...
Threats    Hackers from Anonymous are planning to   attack Sony for its support of SOPA next  Monday (23 January 2012), ac...
Hashtags      *8% of all the SOPA        tweets used the           hashtag     #BlackoutSOPA.     *25% of the SOPA      tw...
However…   Despite all the effort, some people   still didn’t get it…
More information  This case study highlights the trends as identified in the analysis of                        the data a...
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saidWot monitors SOPA

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A look at the data captured from the SOPA saga.

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saidWot monitors SOPA

  1. 1. SOPAA saidWot Case Study Stop Online Piracy Act9 – 18 January 2012Based on English mentionsonly.
  2. 2. "It’s a dangerous and troubling development when the platforms that serve as gateways to informationintentionally skew the facts to incite their users in order to further their corporate interests.“* *quote from Hackernews
  3. 3. How one legislative act can impact the Internet as we know it
  4. 4. Facts & Figures This Case Study is based on comments received from the 9th of January until the protest commenced on 18 January 2012. It is based on English comments from around the world and from all online media sources available. It is based on the most popular hashtags #SOPA and #BlackoutSOPA (not including #PIPA etc.) This case study was compiled to showcase how one legislative act can unite the world. If you would like us to do this for your brand or for something you are passionate about, please contact us: www.saidwot.com | infosa@saidwot.com
  5. 5. How many people were talking? Over a period of 10 days, we tracked more than 2 112 000 comments about SOPA, spreading the message to over 6 192 545 251 people.
  6. 6. How many people were talking? At its peak 11 000 English mentions were posted every 5 minutes
  7. 7. What was said?
  8. 8. Where did the conversation take place? 99% on Social Media Platforms 1.48% of the coverage was posted on Websites and 0.06% on News Sites 0.06% Blog posts 0.01% discussions on Forums0.06% Wiki articles
  9. 9. Where in the social media landscape? 85% 0.46% 14% 0.15% 0.72% Keep in mind that most people have set their privacy settings on Facebook to ‘friends only’. These comments cannot be monitored or tracked.
  10. 10. Who was listening?
  11. 11. How much was it worth? 6 192 545 251 people. were potentially exposed to comments and opinions about SOPA In marketing terms, this translates to R836 523 578 worth of free advertising.
  12. 12. Detractors Commentary was negative and mainly encouragedpeople to join the protests along with Reddit, Wikipedia, Google etc.
  13. 13. Creativity Protests took on a creative form
  14. 14. Avatars Avatars on Twitter were changed and hashtags were used incessantly
  15. 15. Memes And humour was used to spread the message even further
  16. 16. Protests A list of SOPA supporters was released (and tweeted), further encouraging the boycott of these brands. Companies such as Google were against it & strongly advised visitors to phone their senators offices to protest the bill. Mark Zuckerburg even posted a status update denouncing the act.
  17. 17. Threats Hackers from Anonymous are planning to attack Sony for its support of SOPA next Monday (23 January 2012), according to a report from SC Magazine, which claims that both Sony.com and the Sony Music store are the targets.
  18. 18. Hashtags *8% of all the SOPA tweets used the hashtag #BlackoutSOPA. *25% of the SOPA tweets used the #SOPA hashtag used *All other tweets either included a different hashtag, or no hashtag at all.
  19. 19. However… Despite all the effort, some people still didn’t get it…
  20. 20. More information This case study highlights the trends as identified in the analysis of the data around SOPA. If you would like us to share the remainder of the analysis, as well as the extensive tracking on this topic with you, please feel free to contact us. Additionally, for a free demo account, queries or requests for information, please don’t hesitate to contact us on the below information. South Africa: United States: Tel: +27 11 021 8738 Tel: +00 (1) 704 450 2403 Email: infosa@saidwot.com Email: infous@saidwot.com Web: www.saidwot.com
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