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Making Great Places

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Cynthia Nikitin of the Project for Public Spaces presented "Making Great Places" on Day Two of R-Squared's Creative Spaces Experience.

Cynthia Nikitin of the Project for Public Spaces presented "Making Great Places" on Day Two of R-Squared's Creative Spaces Experience.

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  • 1. What Makes a Great Public Space?Presented by Cynthia Nikitin R Squared: Risk and Reward ConferenceSenior Vice President, PPS Telluride, CO September 11, 2012
  • 2. 37 Years of Placemaking 50 U.S. States, 7 Canadian Provinces 42 Countries Over 110 Major Cities 3000 Communities 2 Million visitors to our web sites (2010) 37,000 people get our electronic newsletter 11300 Twitter 8200 Facebook
  • 3. DowntownsSquares Civic CentersPublic Markets Streets and Roads NeighborhoodsParks Mixed-Use Centers Campuses
  • 4. We shape our public spaces; thereafter our public spacesshape us. –PPS, adapted from Winston Churchill
  • 5. “It’s difficult to create a space that will not attract people.What is remarkable is how often this has been accomplished.”- William H. Whyte
  • 6. “What attracts people most, itwould appear, is other people.” ─William H. Whyte
  • 7. It’s often difficult forpeople to understand thatplace is more importantthan design. ─ PPS
  • 8. Why don’t we have better Public Spaces today?• Fear• Narrow Development Goals• Project-driven vs. Place- driven Planning• Discipline-Based Planning/Design vs. Community-Based Placemaking• Government Structure
  • 9. We Have to TurnEverything Upside Down - To Get it Right Side Up To Get from Inadequate back to Extraordinary
  • 10. Key AttributesWhat Makes a Great Place? Intangibles Measurements street life business ownership evening use property values volunteerism land-use patterns Fun retail sales Welcoming Cooperative Active Vital Neighborly Special Real sociability uses & activities PLACE access & linkages comfort & image Connected Safe Walkable Charm Clean Convenient Attractive Accessible Historic crime statstransit usage sanitation ratingpedestrian activity PROJECTconditions building FORparking usage patterns environmental data PUBLIC SPACES
  • 11. A TALE OF TWO LIBRARIES
  • 12. City Library, Salt Lake City, UT
  • 13. Princeton Public Library, Princeton, NJ
  • 14. Qualities of a Great Public Space• Attractions & Destinations• Identity & Image• Flexibility in Design• Amenities• Transparency• Active Edges• Triangulation• Seasonal Strategy• Mix of Uses• Reach out like and Octopus• Diverse Funding Base• Management
  • 15. Attractions & Destinations
  • 16. Image & Identity
  • 17. Accessible
  • 18. Flexible Design
  • 19. Amenities
  • 20. Active Edges
  • 21. Transparency
  • 22. Triangulation
  • 23. Seasonal Strategies
  • 24. Mix of Uses
  • 25. The best way to handle the issue of undesirables is to make a place attractive to everyone else. –William H. Whyte
  • 26. Reach out like an Octopus
  • 27. Creating Great Civic Spaces Diverse Funding Base Security -- In Kind City Funding Donations 23% 17%•Public support Facility -•Private sponsorship Parks•Broad partnerships Tenant Department Leases 6% 24% Event Rentals 18% Event Sponsorships 12%
  • 28. Management: Central to the Solution
  • 29. Tools and Techniques for Creating Great Public Spaces 1. The community is the expert 2. You are creating a place not just a designUnderlying Ideas 3. You can’t do it alone 4. They always say it can’t be donePlanning & Outreach 5. You can see a lot just by observingTechniques 6. Develop a visionTranslating Ideas 7. Form supports functionInto Action 8. Triangulate 9. Start with the petuniasImplementation 10. Money is not the issue 11. You are never finished
  • 30. 5. You can see a lot just by observing  Start by looking at how spaces are really working  Identify problem areas  Brainstorm solutions
  • 31. Children’s WorkshopCreating a vision through art
  • 32. BRACWest Farms SquarePedestrian Surveys
  • 33. Community Destination and TransitRoute Mapping
  • 34. Place Imagination Exercise
  • 35. BRACWest Farms SquareTime Lapse Photography
  • 36. BRACWest Farms SquareTime Lapse Photography
  • 37. BRACWest Farms SquareRendering
  • 38. 6. Develop a vision Be ambitious and create long term goals.
  • 39. PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • 40. PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • 41. Stakeholder Interviewees: Library Staff City/County Planning Arts, Cultural and Community Organizations City/County Elected Officials Friends of the Library and Genealogy Society WGCU Transportation Property and Business Owners FMRA PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • 42. PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • 43. Concept 2 PROJECT FOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • 44. CREATING A GREAT URBAN LIBRARYIN DOWNTOWN FT. MYERS PROJECTFOR PUBLIC SPACES
  • 45. Communities Today Offices Churches Hospital Theatres/Coffee MuseumsShops Community Parks Center Transit Libraries Schools City Hall
  • 46. Communities of the Future Churches Schools City Hall Community CentersLibraries Civic Squares Community Gathering Theatres/ Museums Coffee Spaces/Parks Shops Offices Hospitals Transit
  • 47. It has to be a CampaignDevelopa vision Attack Complacency Produce Become great short term wins Connect changecommunicators Organize a to the culture strong team of the Take on community Search for bigger impediments challenges People Who Make Dramatic Change By John Kotter
  • 48. Five PlacemakingStrategies for the Library of the future1. Conceive of and program libraries as public spaces2. Programmatic diversification vs. capital intensive efforts3. Facilitate partnerships with community organizations, civic institutions, & the private sector4. Leverage other public sector resources5. Undertake cooperative resource planning
  • 49. "Place Game" Evaluation Process  Break into teams and assign a leader  Go out to assigned public-space sites and use the Place Game form to evaluate, observe, and interview  Return here at the appointed time to discuss your findings with your team  Create a mini-presentation to report back to all workshop participants
  • 50. Access & Linkages • Convenient • Walkable • Continuity • Proximity • Connected • Enticing
  • 51. Uses & Activities • Fun/Vital • Active • Indigenous • Sustainable • Affordable
  • 52. Red Hook, Brooklyn
  • 53. Comfort & Image • Attractive • Inviting • Usable • Historic • “Green” • Friendly
  • 54. Sociability • Welcoming • Interactive • Neighborliness • Pride • Diversity • Stewardship
  • 55. Agenda10:00 –10:45 pm• Place Evaluation Exercise• Evaluation of selected site. Teams will be assigned a specific site to evaluate and brainstorm ideas for.10:45 –11:30 am• Team Work and Brainstorming Session• Small group discussions11:30 – 12:00 pm• Applicability and Replicability Discussion• Adjourn
  • 56. Reflection Plaza
  • 57. Reflection Plaza:Site 1
  • 58. Reflection Plaza: Site 2
  • 59. Reflection Plaza: Site 3
  • 60. Reflection Plaza: Site 4
  • 61. Heritage Plaza: Site 1
  • 62. Heritage Plaza: Site 2
  • 63. Heritage Plaza: Site 3
  • 64. Heritage Plaza: Site 4
  • 65. www.pps.org @CynthiaNikitin Cnikitin@pps.org

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