Parks and open spaces

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  • This inequitable distribution of park space harms the residents of these communities and creates substantial costs for the nation as a whole.
  • This inequitable distribution of park space harms the residents of these communities and creates substantial costs for the nation as a whole.
  • Parks and open spaces

    1. 1. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa Parmanand Sinha Srijana Shakya
    2. 2. • As a city grows, new places are needed where residents can play, relax, meet their neighbors and enjoy the natural environment . • Parks and open spaces provide personal, social, environment and economic benefits and are important to our quality of life.
    3. 3. History • The public realm consisted of unpaved streets, squares, marketplaces or vast tracts of wilderness outside the city • No parks created for public recreation no public gymnasium and no public libraries Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    4. 4. Frederick Law Olmsted was the first person to give form to an agenda that included public parks, playgrounds, boulevards and parkways, park systems, conservation and suburban subdivisions Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    5. 5. Neighborhood Parks • A neighborhood Park can range in size from 1 to 15 acres. • Include spaces for passive and active uses. • Picnic areas, playgrounds, areas for games such as basketball , football, baseball. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    6. 6. Community Parks • A Community Park can range in size from 16 to 99 acres typically will serve several neighborhoods. • parking facilities • Passive and active facilities. • Include biking and walking trails, picnic areas, playgrounds, athletic fields, and court areas. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    7. 7. Special Use Parks • Special Use Parks are parks which have been designed for a single special purpose. • Variable in size. • Examples: zoos, arboretums, plazas, or memorials. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    8. 8. Linear Parks • These are developed to accommodate walking or bicycle trails. • Usually, these parks are developed along a natural or utility corridor; often serve the secondary purpose of linking two or more parks together. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    9. 9. Common Open Space • It is a territory that is jointly used by a group of people. • It is not a public because those who not hold it common can be excluded. It is not a private either because it has to be shared with others. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    10. 10. Plaza Bonuses • It is generally intended to improve the quality of contiguous streets and sidewalks and to give space between the buildings and crowded sites. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    11. 11. Natural Parks • Locations that are virtually free of man-made structures • Used for passive, low impact activities such as trail walking, wildlife watching, and controlled primitive camping. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    12. 12. NRPA Parks Acreage per 1,000 population Park Category Standard Park Size NRPA Standard (Acres/1,000 residents) Neighborhood Parks 1 – 15 Acres 1-2 Acres/1,000 pop. Community Parks 16 – 99 Acres 5-8 Acres/1,000 pop. Special Use Parks Variable 3 Acres/1,000 pop. Linear Parks Variable 5 Acres/1,000 pop. Nature Parks Variable Standard Set by City Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    13. 13. Merits • There are about four broad categories of the uses of parks and open spaces. 1. Aesthetic 2. Barrier 3. Substitution 4. Safety Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    14. 14. Growing Smart • Open space preservation helps communities grow smart, preventing the higher costs of unplanned development. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    15. 15. Attracting Investment • Parks and open space create a high quality of life that attracts tax-paying businesses and residents to communities. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    16. 16. Revitalizing Cities • Urban parks, gardens, and recreational open space stimulate commercial growth and promote inner-city revitalization. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    17. 17. Boosting Tourism • Open space boosts local economies by attracting tourists and supporting outdoor recreation. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    18. 18. Protecting Farms and Ranches • Protecting agricultural lands safeguards the future of farming economies and communities. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    19. 19. Safeguarding the Environment • Open space conservation is often the cheapest way to safeguard drinking water, clean the air, and achieve other environmental goals. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    20. 20. • Anti-social activities seen in the parks like drug abuse, smuggling, robbery and vandalism • Isolation of activities and lack of connection with other spaces reduce social interactions and thus more vulnerable to drug users and dealers Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya Issues
    21. 21. Solutions • Increasing activities that attract different people • Avoiding isolated activities that create a basis for vulnerability • Increasing and widening access points
    22. 22. Issues • Low-income neighborhoods populated by minorities and recent immigrants are especially short of park space. • From an equity standpoint, there is a strong need to redress this imbalance. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    23. 23. Park-Poor Cities In Los Angeles, white neighborhoods enjoy 31.8 acres of park space for every 1,000 people, compared with 1.7 acres in African American neighborhoods and 0.6 acres in Latino neighborhoods. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    24. 24. Reducing Crime • Reduces juvenile delinquency. • Fort Worth, Texas, crime dropped 28 percent within a one-mile radius of community centers where midnight basketball was offered. • In the areas around five other Fort Worth community centers where the programs were not offered, crime rose an average of 39 percent during the same period. Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya
    25. 25. • Urban policies should give more attention to urban green spaces so that more money can be budgeted for green spaces • Money may be generated from private financing like business and foundations, giving donations, by public-private partnerships and from tourists and visitors Parks and Open Spaces James Gesumwa, Parmanand Sinha, Srijana Shakya Finance
    26. 26. THANK YOU

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