EEX 504 ONE TRANSITION

704 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
704
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

EEX 504 ONE TRANSITION

  1. 1. Marie Michelle Glemaud Science Teacher EEX 504 Vocational and Functional Life for Students with Disabilities September 01, 2005 Professor: Dr. Walter J. Cegelka
  2. 2. Chapter 1 Part One Transition Education Services In Perspective Chapter 1 Part One Transition Education Services In Perspective Chapter 1 Part One Transition Education Services In Perspective Chapter 1 Part One Transition Education Services In Perspective Chapter 1 Part One Transition Education Services In Perspective
  3. 3. Development of programs in the United Stated <ul><li>1990- Public education for individuals with disabilities started to develop according to </li></ul><ul><li>Principal of opportunity </li></ul><ul><li>Required the enrollment in school with no restrictions place on participation. </li></ul>Two principles Opportunity Proof
  4. 4. Principle of Proof <ul><li>Used tests to evaluate level of achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Used letter grade, A,B,C,D,F </li></ul><ul><li>Unit of Credits: 1899 -college entrance requirement </li></ul><ul><li>1906 -Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching : The satisfaction completion of a class dealing with some subject that met five days per week for a minimum of 40 minutes each day or a minimum of 120Hrs per year . </li></ul><ul><li>Known as the Carnegie unit- 14 unit credits </li></ul><ul><li>Today:20-24 unit credits Exit Exam </li></ul>
  5. 5. Historical development of work-training <ul><li>John Duncan- England </li></ul><ul><li>developed Duncan’s school to train people for works in society. </li></ul><ul><li>Opened to Individuals with disabilities and children of the street “students at risk” </li></ul><ul><li>Jobs training included Carpentry, cooking baking domestic jobs - associated with concrete intelligent. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Richard Hungerford, director of the Bureau for Children with retarded Mental Development 1941 and 1944-published Occupational Education that outlined step-by-step instructions to help teachers trained individuals with mental retardation. 1958-kolstoe and Frey demonstrated in their book titled A High School Work Study Program for Mental Subnormal students that educational, social and behavioral skills were needed beside of basic training skills to success in the work place. 1960 Gold demonstrated that people with severe disabilities could perform complex assembly task with training.
  7. 7. Beginnings of vocational Education <ul><li>1963- The Vocation Education Act </li></ul><ul><li>Provided the right to people with disabilities to participate in ongoing vocational education with non-disabled individuals. </li></ul><ul><li>No funds were appropriated. </li></ul><ul><li>Small number of disabled were involved in vocational education. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Ten percent of the funds was put aside to serve youth with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>States were required to have a plan that described how the fund was going to be used. </li></ul>1968 – The vocational Education Act Amendment Beginnings of Vocational Education cont.
  9. 9. 1975 The Education for All handicapped Children Act – PL (Public Law) 94-142 <ul><li>Provided a free and appropriate education for all individuals with disabilities. </li></ul><ul><li>States that failed to comply with this law would lose all federal funds </li></ul><ul><li>From 1973-1978 enrollment figure increased by 60 percent. </li></ul>
  10. 10. The Career Education Movement 1971- Sidney Marland First presented the concept of career education. He defined it as way ofpreparation to earn a living and also a way to learn about living itself. K-12 program model. Hoyt defined career education as “the totality of experience through which one learns about and prepares to engage in work as part of her or his way of living.”
  11. 11. Development of career Education Models <ul><li>During the 1970s & 1980s there were three models characteristics of program developed </li></ul><ul><li>Life-centered career education (LCCE) model Presented by Brolin and Kokaska </li></ul><ul><li>Consisted of the three stages </li></ul><ul><li>a. Stages of career development </li></ul><ul><li>b. School, family, and community experiences </li></ul><ul><li>c. Set of 22 basic life-centered competencies </li></ul>
  12. 12. The 22 competencies were groups and broken down as the following Group 1. Daily living skills 1. Managing family finances 2. Selecting, managing, and maintaining a home 3. Caring for personal needs 4. Raising children and living as a family 5. Buying and preparing food 6. Buying and caring for clothes 7. Engaging in civic activities 8. Using recreation and leisure 9. Getting around the community (mobility)
  13. 13. Group 2. Personal-Social Skills 10. Achieving self-awareness 11. Acquiring self-confidences 13. Maintaining socially responsibility behavior 14. Achieving independence 15. Achieving problem-solving skills 16. Communicating adequately with others. Group 3. Occupational Guidance and Preparation 17. Knowing and exploring occupational possibilities 18. Selecting and planning occupational choices 19. Exhibiting appropriate work habits and behaviors 20. Exhibiting sufficient physical-manual behaviors 21. Gaining a specific occupational skill 22. Seeking, securing, and maintaining employment
  14. 14. <ul><li>Career Education for exceptional children and youth - Gillet </li></ul><ul><li>Centered on a core program modified to fit the type of degree of disability. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on work and occupation roles only. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools-Based Career Development and Transition Education Model </li></ul>Development of career Education Models cont.
  15. 15. Functional and Community-based Models for Students with severe with disabilities . Dever published the community living skills Taxonomy Smith and schloss developed the Community-Referenced Curriculum McDonnel and associates developed the School and Community Integration Project
  16. 16. END! PART ONE END! PART ONE END! PART ONE END! PART ONE END! PART ONE
  17. 17. Rose Joimelus-Williams Professor Dr. Cegelka September 1, 2005 Thursday 6:00-10:00 pm
  18. 18. Transition Education and Services in Perspective
  19. 19. <ul><li>It is a change in status from behaving as a student unto taking emergent adult role in the community. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Independent Living for Persons with Disabilities <ul><li>The term transition was used in the late 1960’s to describe an orderly passage from school or institutional programming to adult services and full community participation. </li></ul><ul><li>The term independent living is thought as the choice, opportunity, and ability to participate actively in the community through home and family life, work, and civic and recreational involvement. </li></ul>
  21. 21. What is the ILR? <ul><li>It is the Independent living rehabilitation that started as a disability-rights in the early 70’s by people with severe physical disabilities. </li></ul>
  22. 22. <ul><li>Rehabilitation Act of 1973 was the first to pass that clearly made a commitment to the provision of vocational rehabilitation services to all people with disabilities who needed more than assistance in gaining employment. </li></ul><ul><li>It provides a legal base for prohibiting denial of services and discrimination through Sections 501, 502, 503, and 504. </li></ul>
  23. 23. How can Transition Programs and Services help? <ul><li>It provide work study and career education. </li></ul><ul><li>Transition services coordinate a set of activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with disability </li></ul><ul><li>Taking into account the child's strengths, preferences, and interest base on the child's need. </li></ul><ul><li>Includes instruction, related services, community services, the development of employment and post school adult living. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Transition from school to Adult Living and the Individuals with disabilities Education Act and its Amendments <ul><li>The IDEA of 1990, Congress establish age 16 as the beginning point to transition services then allowed the transitioning planning at 14-15. </li></ul><ul><li>IDEA 2004 retreated from the progressive stance of the 1997 amendments to move the mandated age for initiating planning back to age 16. The IEP (Individual Education Program) requirements and PL 94-142 ensure a better individual planning for transition. </li></ul>
  25. 25. Transition and Education Services Model <ul><li>We believe that instruction or an educational component is absolutely critical in facilitating not only the development of knowledge and skills related to making the transition form school to the adult community and also self determination skills. </li></ul><ul><li>We believe that transition services are critical for students and their families to ;have some knowledge about and access to support services at school and in the community. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Assumptions for a Comprehensive Transition Education and Services Approach <ul><li>Life long career development and transition education are needed for all persons. </li></ul><ul><li>One’s lifelong career is one’s progress. </li></ul><ul><li>The age appropriate independent and interdependent living through career development. </li></ul><ul><li>Neglect or adversity in any aspect of human growth </li></ul><ul><li>Society imposes limits on people with disabilities. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Proposed Comprehensive Transition Education and Services Models <ul><li>Individual education program requirement in what a student needs in order to meet his or her transition services needs </li></ul><ul><li>Transition needs to begin as early as possible </li></ul><ul><li>The students, their families, and appropriate community service agencies must be involved. </li></ul>
  28. 28. The knowledge and skill domains <ul><li>It is refer to those skills or performance areas that are important for successfully coping with life. </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to pg. 25-26 </li></ul>
  29. 29. Exit Points and Outcomes <ul><li>The decision to exit is not always based on age and readiness for a more advanced level of education. </li></ul><ul><li>Good education and services would extend to its academic preparation of a students throughout his or her school years and be ready for more advanced levels. </li></ul>
  30. 30. Education and Service Delivery Systems <ul><li>Emphasize the collaborative nature of transition education </li></ul><ul><li>In 1990 federal mandate for transition services under the IDEA PL 101-476 for linkages with appropriateness nonschool agencies and service delivery systems which are school-based. </li></ul>
  31. 31. <ul><li>We as teachers and future educators must emphasize the major knowledge and skill domains that are evolving in transition services. </li></ul><ul><li>Highlight the lifelong aspects of transitions and the different expectations for various transitions exit points. </li></ul><ul><li>Stress the shared responsibility and potential of a variety of transition education and service-delivery systems. </li></ul>
  32. 32. What does transition means? <ul><li>It is a change in status from behaving as a student unto taking emergent adult role in the community. </li></ul>
  33. 33. What is the ILR? <ul><li>It is the Independent living rehabilitation that started as a disability-rights in the early 70’s by people with severe physical disabilities. </li></ul>
  34. 34. How can Transition Programs and Services help? <ul><li>It provide work study and career education. </li></ul><ul><li>Transition services coordinate a set of activities. </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on improving the academic and functional achievement of the child with disability </li></ul><ul><li>Taking into account the child's strengths, preferences, and interest base on the child's need. </li></ul><ul><li>Includes instruction, related services, community services, the development of employment and post school adult living. </li></ul>
  35. 35. Transition from school to Adult Living and the Individuals with disabilities Education Act and its Amendments <ul><li>The IDEA of 1990, Congress establish age 16 as the beginning point to transition services then allowed the transitioning planning at 14-15. </li></ul><ul><li>IDEA 2004 retreated from the progressive stance it the 1997 amendments to move the mandated age for initiating planning back to age 16. The IEP (Individual Education Program) requirements and PL 94-142 ensure a better individual planning for transition. </li></ul>
  36. 36. Transition and Education Services Model <ul><li>We believe that instruction or an educational component is absolutely critical in facilitating not only the development of knowledge and skills related to making the transition form school to the adult community and also self determination skills. </li></ul><ul><li>We believe that transition services are critical for students and their families to ;have some knowledge about and access to support services at school and in the community. </li></ul>
  37. 37. Assumptions for a Comprehensive Transition Education and Services Approach <ul><li>Life long career development and transition education are needed for all persons. </li></ul><ul><li>One’s lifelong career is one’s progress. </li></ul><ul><li>The age appropriate independent and interdependent living through career development. </li></ul><ul><li>Neglect or adversity in any aspect of human growth </li></ul><ul><li>Society imposes limits on people with disabilities. </li></ul>
  38. 38. Proposed Comprehensive Transition Education and Services Models <ul><li>Individual education program requirement in what a student needs in order to meet his or her transition services needs </li></ul><ul><li>Transition needs to begin as early as possible </li></ul><ul><li>The students, their families, and appropriate community service agencies must be involved. </li></ul>
  39. 39. The knowledge and skill domains <ul><li>It is refer to those skills or performance areas that are important for successfully coping with life. </li></ul><ul><li>Refer to pg. 25-26 </li></ul>
  40. 40. Exit Points and Outcomes <ul><li>The decision to exit is not always based on age and readiness for a more advanced level of education. </li></ul><ul><li>Good education and services would extend to its academic preparation of a students throughout his or her school years and be ready for more advanced levels. </li></ul>
  41. 41. Education and Service Delivery Systems <ul><li>Emphasize the collaborative nature of transition education </li></ul><ul><li>In 1990 federal mandate for transition services under the IDEA PL 101-476 for linkages with appropriate nonschool agencies and service delivery systems which are school-based. </li></ul>

×