0
THINKING
CREATIVE
Part 1:
VISUALIZE
IDEAS & DATA
THINK BIG
BRAINSTORMING
THINKABUNDANCE
GOOD IDEAS
grow from need & enthusiasm
START
SMALL
GROW
BIGGER
ROADMAP
plan five years out
HUDDLEZAPPO’S METHOD
HUDDLE
ZAPPO’S METHOD
•  Communicates vision
•  Provides clarity
•  Demonstrates Unity
HUDDLE
ZAPPO’S METHOD
Not a weekly meeting –
time limited collaborative
encouragement
HUDDLE
ZAPPO’S METHOD
Plan, but be spontaneous:
Eat, watch inspirational
materials, showcase work
JOT DOWN
EVERYTHING
ANYTHING
can spark an idea
GO MENTALbreaks help creativity & boost morale
PATTERNS
OF COMMUNICATION
PATTERNS
OF COMMUNICATION
§  Communciations
§  Team intelligence
§  Personality
§  Skill
§  Substance of Discussions
§...
HAPPY
HOUR
for creative problem
solving
BREAK
FOR GAMES
BREAKFOR COFFEE
BREAK
FOR MOVIES
COOPER
shared
GROUND RULES
Push & Pull
SYNERGIST
& DESIGNER
YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY
RESEARCH & TOOLS
research NOT speculation
YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY
RESEARCH & TOOLS
personas NOT personal
YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY
RESEARCH & TOOLS
scenarios NOT ‘what if’
YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY
RESEARCH & TOOLS
sketches NOT pixels
YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY
RESEARCH & TOOLS
patterns NOT one-offs
collaborative work
PRESUME VALUE
BUILD, NOT BLOCK
EXTERNALIZE THINKING	
  
SEEK
NOT
progress
perfection
BUILDING
TRUST TAKES
time
DECISIONS
MAKING BETTER
Part 2:
YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY
INVISIBLE FACTORS
The PSYCHOLOGICAL
INFLUENCES:
BIAS FROM CONSISTENCY
& COMMITMENT
TENDENCY
INCENTIVE-CAUSED
BIAS
BIAS from
PAVLOVIAN
ASSOCIATION
RECIPROCATION
TENDENCY
CONTRAST-CAUSED
DISTORTIONS
DEPRIVAL, SUPER-REACTION
SYNDROME
(DIS) LIKE
DISTORTION
STRESS-INDUCED
MENTAL CHANGES
COMBINE
THESE FACTORS often
always…
THE CUSTOMER IS
OVERCOME THE
INFLUENCES
CONQUER
with
W.R.A.P
WIDENYOUR OPTIONS
REALITY-TEST
YOUR ASSUMPTIONS
attainDISTANCE
Prepare TO BE
WRONG
“MAYBE THE MOST
UNDERAPPRECIATED THING ABOUT
STEVE WAS THAT HE HAD THE
COURAGE TO CHANGE HIS MIND.”
- Tim Cook on Steve Jo...
Listen to Charlie Munger:
bit.ly/1oKnWmM
carlos morales
morales2@ufl.edu
jeffrey stevens
jstevens@ufl.edu
@kuratowa
IMAGE CREDITS
Daniel Y Go
Arielle Nadel
Arielle Nadel
Arielle Nadel
Vandinglewop
Ccho
Arielle Nadel
Giantenshi
Nomadic Las...
Nobody's Got Time for That: The Case for Making Time for Creative Culture
Nobody's Got Time for That: The Case for Making Time for Creative Culture
Nobody's Got Time for That: The Case for Making Time for Creative Culture
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Nobody's Got Time for That: The Case for Making Time for Creative Culture

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Teams that allow time for the creative process are essential for modern, forward-thinking organizations. Part one of this presentation discusses tips and techniques for building a team culture that makes the time for mental breaks and collaborative exercises that promotes creativity and problem-solving. Part two discusses some of the psychological factors that keep us from taking that creative leap forward. Presented by Jeff Stevens and Carlos Morales and the 2014 Summer UF Health Communications Retreat at the Hippodrome.

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  • Every day we are expected to make decisions. Some are minor and have no lasting impact, but sometimes the decisions we make can have a lasting impact on our careers and on our personal lives. When the decision matters, how do you know you’re making the right one?


    Photo by jnap - http://www.flickr.com/photos/25843092@N04/4386154663/
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Every day we are expected to make decisions. Some are minor and have no lasting impact, but sometimes the decisions we make can have a lasting impact on our careers and on our personal lives. When the decision matters, how do you know you’re making the right one?


    Photo by jnap - http://www.flickr.com/photos/25843092@N04/4386154663/
  • Whether you realize it or not, your decisions are being influenced by invisible factors. The sad truth is that many of these factors are rooted in psychological mechanisms that can sometimes cause you to make the wrong decision.
     
    To be able to combat these psychological quirks, we must first attempt to identify them.
  • Now, I’m sure many of you are familiar with some pretty common/wide-spread ones we see everyday. This includes things like conformational bias and group-think.

    In this brief presentation, however, we are going to take a tour of some my more favorite “invisible” factors that we may hear less of. Most of the items on this list are courtesy of Charlie Munger (Warren Buffet’s lesser known, but equally talented partner at Berkshire Hathaway) at a speech he gave to Harvard in 1995.
     
    In it, Charlie outlines about 24 major psychological influences (We’re just going to touch on a few)...

    Let’s start:
  • Bias from consistency and commitment tendency – it has always been this way, so we should keep doing it that way. The human mind has a tendency to shut off once an idea or decision has been established. This one doesn’t need much explanation. We are creatures of habit. Some habits are good… but habitually coming to the same decisions may blind you to other choices.
  • Incentive-cause (or based) Bias – if you benefit from the bad decision, it becomes difficult to stop making it. Example: The great moral instrument: the cash register. John Henry Patterson ran a small miner’s supply store where he was constantly being robbed blind by his employees. Some folks some his some cash registers, and he instantly became profitable. The structure of the register, its tracking of receipts, etc. made it far more difficult to do this and automated the process. The store was immediately profitable, and Patterson went on to form the NCR – National Cash Register company.
  • Bias from Pavlovian association – a fairly large majority of advertising works this way: associate your product with something positive, and it becomes a better product. Are your decisions associated with good outcomes, or bad?
  • Reciprocation tendency (including the tendency of one in a roll to act as other persons expect.) –

    ONE EXAMPLE: Charlie gives the example of Wal-Mart’s Sam Walton. Sam Walton would not let a purchasing agent take a handkerchief from a salesman, because he knew how powerful the subconscious reciprocation tendency can be. Taking anything from a salesman, could influence the buyer to direct a deal to the salesman as a kind of payback. And it’s possible the buyer would not even know that he/she is favoring the agent.

    ANOTHER EXAMPLE (multiple influences in this examples…)
    Asks people on a campus if they would like to sponsor an underprivileged, but behaviorally difficult child, for a day at the zoo (take some juvenile delinquents to the zoo). Initially. The results depended greatly on the manner of the request. If he said something like, “would you like to devote two afternoons a week to taking juvenile delinquents somewhere and suffering greatly to help them”, he got 2/3 saying no. But then, he’d ask them a second time: “Could you take these underprivileged children to the zoo for just one afternoon?”, his compliance rate increased to 50%. Ask for a lot and back off, but people are expected to help out
  • contrast-caused distortions of sensation, perception and cognition : Practical example: Real estate agent takes you to two crummy houses before taking you to a third average house, which now looks amazing. You fall in love with the average house.

    Another example: experiment includes three buckets of water (one hot, one cold, one room temperature). Stick your hand into the hot, it feels hot. Now stick the other hand in the cold, feels cold. Now take both and stick it in the lukewarm water. Each hand reverses its feeling, even though the water is neutral.
  • Bias from deprival, super-reaction syndrome, including bias caused by present or threatened scarcity (Moving People’s Cheese) - This one is well known.. It just has an awesomely complicated name. Or, said in another way: moving people’s cheese. Good example: New Coke.

    You can also positively motivate people by making them believe they are missing out on something (artificial scarcity); it’s the same effect.
  • [Dis]like Distortion – Liking a decision because you made it, or someone you like made it, or the reverse: disliking a decision because you dislike the person who made it. One example of decisions influenced by this: consultants recommendation is to hire more consultants!
  • Stress-induced mental changes – Remember Pavlov’s dogs? Well, a flood hit the lab while they were still cages. So the water rises, and these dogs nearly drown. With their little snouts just barely getting air someone walks into the lab and raises a bunch of them, saving them. He found that for many of the dogs, the learned behavior had been erased.
  • ...these are just a small sampling, and in real-world applications, these factors combine with many others. Rarely in any given situation do just one of these factors play a role; rather, it is many at once.
  • Consider a story told by Procter & Gamble Chairman A.G. Lafley about his own learning while working on the Tide brand in the 1980s:

    “Every year consumers would rate the Tide powder cardboard package as excellent; excellent to shop; excellent for opening; excellent in use — on, on, on. So, I’m in basements in Tennessee, in Kentucky, doing loads of laundry with women, and after three or four or five of these one-on-one sessions, I’ve realized that not a single woman has opened a box of Tide with her hands.

    Why not? How do you open a box of detergent? Why don’t you open the box of detergent with your hands? You’ll break your fingernails! You’re not going to subject those nails to a box of laundry detergent. So, how did they open the box? They had nail files; they had screw drivers; they had all kinds of things sitting down on the shelf over their washing machine, and they thought our package was excellent! And you know what? We thought our package was excellent because they were telling us our package was excellent.”
  • Being familiar with some of these psychological influences is half the battle. Once you know you’re there, what can you do to help overcome them?
  • Being familiar with some of these psychological influences is half the battle. Once you know you’re there, what can you do to help overcome them?
  • You encounter a choice. But narrow framing makes you miss options. So … Widen Your Options. How can you expand your sent of choices? …

    How do you widen your options?
    More options increase odds of making successful decision. “Thumbs up or down” decisions (yes or no) decrease odds of success.
    Research suggest adding 1 additional option results in a decision being 6X more likely to be successful according to Heath
  • 2. You analyze your options. But the confirmation bias leads you to gather self-serving information. So … Reality-Test Your Assumptions. How can you get outside your head and collect information you can trust? …

  • 3. You make a choice. But short-term emotion will often tempt you to make the wrong one. So … Attain Distance Before Deciding. How can you overcome short-term emotion and conflicted feelings to make better choices? …
    Sleep on it
    Consider 10/10/10 (Think of implications 10 minutes, 10 months, 10 years from now)
    - For business decisions ask yourself, “What would your successor do?”
  • 4. Then you live with it. But you’ll often be overconfident about how the future will unfold. So … Prepare to Be Wrong. How can we plan for an uncertain future so that we give our decisions the best chance to succeed? …

    ...leading into this idea of being wrong, we have a great quote from Tim Cook on Steve Jobs [insert groan here...]
  • “More so than any person I ever met in my life, he had the ability to change his mind…. He could be so sold on a certain direction and in a nanosecond (Cook snaps his fingers) have a completely different view. (Laughs.) I thought in the early days, “Wow, this is strange.” Then I realized how much of a gift it was. So many people, particularly, I think, CEOs and top executives, they get so planted in their old ideas, and they refuse or don’t have the courage to admit that they’re now wrong. Maybe the most underappreciated thing about Steve was that he had the courage to change his mind.”
  • 3. You make a choice. But short-term emotion will often tempt you to make the wrong one. So … Attain Distance Before Deciding. How can you overcome short-term emotion and conflicted feelings to make better choices? …
    Sleep on it
    Consider 10/10/10 (Think of implications 10 minutes, 10 months, 10 years from now)
    - For business decisions ask yourself, “What would your successor do?”
  • Transcript of "Nobody's Got Time for That: The Case for Making Time for Creative Culture"

    1. 1. THINKING CREATIVE Part 1:
    2. 2. VISUALIZE IDEAS & DATA
    3. 3. THINK BIG BRAINSTORMING
    4. 4. THINKABUNDANCE
    5. 5. GOOD IDEAS grow from need & enthusiasm
    6. 6. START SMALL GROW BIGGER
    7. 7. ROADMAP plan five years out
    8. 8. HUDDLEZAPPO’S METHOD
    9. 9. HUDDLE ZAPPO’S METHOD •  Communicates vision •  Provides clarity •  Demonstrates Unity
    10. 10. HUDDLE ZAPPO’S METHOD Not a weekly meeting – time limited collaborative encouragement
    11. 11. HUDDLE ZAPPO’S METHOD Plan, but be spontaneous: Eat, watch inspirational materials, showcase work
    12. 12. JOT DOWN EVERYTHING
    13. 13. ANYTHING can spark an idea
    14. 14. GO MENTALbreaks help creativity & boost morale
    15. 15. PATTERNS OF COMMUNICATION
    16. 16. PATTERNS OF COMMUNICATION §  Communciations §  Team intelligence §  Personality §  Skill §  Substance of Discussions §  Trust and respect §  Morale
    17. 17. HAPPY HOUR for creative problem solving
    18. 18. BREAK FOR GAMES
    19. 19. BREAKFOR COFFEE
    20. 20. BREAK FOR MOVIES
    21. 21. COOPER
    22. 22. shared GROUND RULES
    23. 23. Push & Pull SYNERGIST & DESIGNER
    24. 24. YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY RESEARCH & TOOLS research NOT speculation
    25. 25. YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY RESEARCH & TOOLS personas NOT personal
    26. 26. YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY RESEARCH & TOOLS scenarios NOT ‘what if’
    27. 27. YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY RESEARCH & TOOLS sketches NOT pixels
    28. 28. YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY RESEARCH & TOOLS patterns NOT one-offs
    29. 29. collaborative work PRESUME VALUE BUILD, NOT BLOCK EXTERNALIZE THINKING  
    30. 30. SEEK NOT progress perfection
    31. 31. BUILDING TRUST TAKES time
    32. 32. DECISIONS MAKING BETTER Part 2:
    33. 33. YOUR DECISIONS ARE BEING Influenced BY INVISIBLE FACTORS
    34. 34. The PSYCHOLOGICAL INFLUENCES:
    35. 35. BIAS FROM CONSISTENCY & COMMITMENT TENDENCY
    36. 36. INCENTIVE-CAUSED BIAS
    37. 37. BIAS from PAVLOVIAN ASSOCIATION
    38. 38. RECIPROCATION TENDENCY
    39. 39. CONTRAST-CAUSED DISTORTIONS
    40. 40. DEPRIVAL, SUPER-REACTION SYNDROME
    41. 41. (DIS) LIKE DISTORTION
    42. 42. STRESS-INDUCED MENTAL CHANGES
    43. 43. COMBINE THESE FACTORS often
    44. 44. always… THE CUSTOMER IS
    45. 45. OVERCOME THE INFLUENCES
    46. 46. CONQUER with W.R.A.P
    47. 47. WIDENYOUR OPTIONS
    48. 48. REALITY-TEST YOUR ASSUMPTIONS
    49. 49. attainDISTANCE
    50. 50. Prepare TO BE WRONG
    51. 51. “MAYBE THE MOST UNDERAPPRECIATED THING ABOUT STEVE WAS THAT HE HAD THE COURAGE TO CHANGE HIS MIND.” - Tim Cook on Steve Jobs
    52. 52. Listen to Charlie Munger: bit.ly/1oKnWmM
    53. 53. carlos morales morales2@ufl.edu jeffrey stevens jstevens@ufl.edu @kuratowa
    54. 54. IMAGE CREDITS Daniel Y Go Arielle Nadel Arielle Nadel Arielle Nadel Vandinglewop Ccho Arielle Nadel Giantenshi Nomadic Lass Rel Photography Louish 365 Anieto2k Arielle Nadel Arielle Nadel Nomadic Lass Gviciano Arielle Nadel [embr] Arielle Nadel Arielle Nadel Vandinglewop Takashi Arielle Nadel sⓘndy° Nomadic Lass Arielle Nadel Arielle Nadel Avenue207 ChezPitch Jlhopgood Nomadic Lass Cj. Viberg inap Arielle Nadel Takashi Blentley Zmabney Louis Engeval Tom Focus Timfotography Dmelchordiaz Arielle Nadel Arielle Nadel Ben K Adams 邪恶的正太 Nomadic Lass
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