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Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines
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Tropical Forest Good Practice Guidelines

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  • 1. Thank you for joining the ATTA Webinar: Tropical Forest Tourism A Practical Guide to Good Practice for Tropical Forest-Based Tours With Christina Heyniger September 6, 10am PDT Webinar Audio: 866-414-2828 (US & Canada) or +1 973-528-0000 Participant Code: 885891# Welcome
  • 2. <ul><li>This presentation is based on Conservation International’s </li></ul><ul><li>Practical Guide to Good Practices for Tropical Forest-Based Tours, written by Tony Charters and Elizabeth Saxon. </li></ul><ul><li>The guide was developed by Conservation International in partnership with Rainforest Alliance and UNEP. </li></ul><ul><li>For a copy of the complete guide go to: </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.ecotour.org </li></ul><ul><li>Htttp://www.conservation.org </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.adventuretravel.biz </li></ul>Acknowledgments
  • 3. Agenda <ul><li>Tropical Forest Tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Why Bother? Benefits of Good Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Key Impacts of Tropical Forest-based Tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Good Business Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Good Environmental Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Specific Practices for Tour Activities: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Nature Walks </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Archaeological Activities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Land-based Adventure </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Freshwater-based Activities </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Performance Monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Self Assessment Sustainability Checklist </li></ul>
  • 4. Earth’s Tropical Forests <ul><li>Amazon Basin </li></ul><ul><li>Southeast Asia </li></ul><ul><li>Congo Basin </li></ul><ul><li>Mountain tropical forests, mangrove tropical forests, coniferous tropical forests of Central America </li></ul><ul><li>Dry Tropical Forest </li></ul><ul><li>Southern Mexico </li></ul><ul><li>Southeastern Africa </li></ul><ul><li>The Lesser Sundas </li></ul><ul><li>Central India </li></ul><ul><li>Indochina </li></ul><ul><li>Madagascar </li></ul><ul><li>New Caledonia </li></ul><ul><li>Eastern Bolivia </li></ul><ul><li>Central Brazil </li></ul><ul><li>Caribbean </li></ul><ul><li>Valleys of northern Andes </li></ul><ul><li>Coasts of Ecuador and Peru </li></ul>Moist Tropical Forest includes lowland broadleaf tropical forests:
  • 5. <ul><ul><li>In 2004, for example, Brazil had 4.7 million visitors who generated US$1.8 billion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Indonesia’s 5.3 million visitors generated nearly US$4.8 billion </li></ul></ul>Tropical forest-based tourism is big business
  • 6. Tropical forest communities <ul><ul><li>500 million people live in or on the edges of the world’s tropical forests. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In developing countries, people are under significant pressure to use these areas to generate national and local economic benefits. </li></ul></ul>
  • 7. Types of tropical forest tours <ul><li>Common tropical forest tour activities: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Birdwatching </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wildlife viewing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hiking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Camping and nature walks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Horseback riding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cycling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Freshwater fishing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Canoeing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kayaking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rafting and river tours </li></ul></ul>
  • 8. What Is Sustainability? <ul><ul><li>Ability to be maintained </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use of natural resources without destroying the ecological balance of the area </li></ul></ul>
  • 9. Why Adopt Good Practices? <ul><li>Protect integrity of tourism resources </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitate high quality visitor experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Meet product demand </li></ul><ul><li>Support to positive relationships with suppliers </li></ul><ul><li>Provide employment </li></ul>Adopting the practices in this guide can support your business in multiple ways:
  • 10. Tropical Forests and Global Biodiversity <ul><li>Why should I care? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Humans can easily upset a delicate balance: affecting one aspect of the ecosystem (such as water quality or breeding patterns) often has ripple effects throughout the entire environment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tropical forest value: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rainforests, which have rainfall of more than 80 inches per year - are home to many plant and animal species </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Produce much of the world’s oxygen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Potentially contain many undiscovered medicinal and commercial products </li></ul></ul>Tropical forest ecosystems are important to global biodiversity!
  • 11. Tropical Forests and Global Biodiversity Poorly managed tropical forest tourism can have disastrous effects over time, greatly diminishing biodiversity: <ul><ul><li>Eroded and unattractive landscapes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Poor habitat results in fewer animals and birds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sparse vegetation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Polluted rivers and springs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Disrupts local communities, cultural sites and activities </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. Tour Operators’ Contribution to Conservation Contributing to conservation efforts can help protect the assets that attract visitors and add to the value of visitor experiences: <ul><ul><li>Clean tropical forest environments make a destination more competitive, with unique flora and fauna </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Participating in conservation activities can enhance your corporate reputation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Conservation is important for the health and well being of local communities </li></ul></ul>
  • 13. Tour Operators’ Contribution to Conservation Specific contributions to conservation that tour operators can make: <ul><ul><li>Adopt good practices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Communicate good practices to customers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage visitor participation in local conservation activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Directly support large-scale conservation projects </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage in small scale conservation such as recycling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose responsible business partners and suppliers </li></ul></ul>
  • 14. Tropical Forests and Climate Change <ul><ul><li>Deforestation and land-use changes such as cattle grazing expansion and mechanized agriculture </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Slash and burn farming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Soil degradation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drainage of wetlands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Road building </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Urban sprawl </li></ul></ul>1/4 of Global Greenhouse Gas Emissions Result From Mismanagement of Tropical Forest Resources:
  • 15. Tropical Forests and Climate Change <ul><li>Why Should I Care? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tropical forests help regulate global climatic conditions: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Amazon basin in particular is crucial for global cooling, releasing 20 billion tons of water into the atmosphere daily! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tropical forests provide essential ecosystem services: water regulation, soil stabilization, pest control </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What Tour Operators Can Do: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Educate visitors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offset carbon cost of tours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop and implement sustainable purchasing guidelines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve operational efficiencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support tropical forest monitoring and research programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Support reforestation programs </li></ul></ul>
  • 16. Visitor Education and Messaging <ul><li>Use the tour to share information about: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Different tropical forest environments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wildlife </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interdependence of animals and nature </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Evolutionary history of the region </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use naturalist guides </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why interpretation is important: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Adds value to the tour experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promotes thoughtful visitor behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Differentiates your product in the market </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Enhances corporate reputation as a knowledgeable, professional operator </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Attracts higher yield customers </li></ul></ul>Learning is a key aspect of adventure tours; make interpretation a priority.
  • 17. Visitor Education and Messaging 1. Identify key messages 2. Conduct research <ul><ul><li>Environmental, cultural, historical points of interest </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How guests should behave in the environment and with communities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Health and safety risks </li></ul></ul>What tour operators can do: <ul><ul><li>Provide visitors with accurate information, not just anecdotes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Backing up your messages with facts can be more effective than just telling people how you want them to behave, for example - explain why! </li></ul></ul>
  • 18. Visitor Education and Messaging 3. Understand your audience <ul><ul><li>Ask about their interests, knowledge, professional skills and try to make interpretation relevant to their experience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider how to cater to non-English speakers, children, elderly, people with disabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Always ask for feedback! </li></ul></ul>What tour operators can do: 4. Keep tour numbers to a manageable size, 15 or fewer is recommended for non-vehicle based tours 5. Develop materials to support education and interpretation
  • 19. Spotlight: Horizontes Nature Tours Costa Rican tour operator provides visitors with a high level of environmental education and interpretation. Established partnership with Rainforest Alliance to sponsor workshops for local hotel owners and tour operators about good practices: <ul><ul><li>Recycling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Waste reduction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Promoting tourism benefits in local communities </li></ul></ul>
  • 20. Built Infrastructure <ul><li>Examples of tropical forest infrastructure for tourists: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Paths </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Boardwalks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bird hides </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Viewing platforms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Suspended walkways </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Bridges </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Signage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Toilet facilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vehicle parks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information centers </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Challenges associated with Built Infrastructure: </li></ul><ul><li>Raised walkways for example prevent erosion, however, if improperly designed and placed they may: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interfere with wildlife </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Block natural waterflows </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage invasive weed growth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Create over-shaded areas </li></ul></ul>
  • 21. Built Infrastructure <ul><li>What tour operators can do: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify sites with the greatest need, cooperate with other operators to minimize footprint </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify suitable infrastructure, avoid overuse of local wood if it is scarce </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share labor and other costs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage the establishment of tourism and tourism buffer zones (100m to 40m depending on sensitivity) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Always comply with safety requirements </li></ul></ul>Well-planned and constructed Built Infrastructure can reduce the impacts of visitors to tropical forest environments.
  • 22. Spotlight: Inkaterra Canopy Walkway In Tambopata, Peru, the Inkaterra Canopy Walkway is 344m long, spanning two towers it includes eight platforms and seven bridges. <ul><li>Conservation-minded features: </li></ul><ul><li>Designed to be camouflaged in the tree tops </li></ul><ul><li>Builders used bolts rather than brackets or clamps to avoid affecting natural tree growth </li></ul><ul><li>Ensured trees had strong defense mechanisms against fungi or bacteria so bolts would not compromise health </li></ul>
  • 23. Engaging With Local Communities <ul><li>The key issues for tour operators in local community interactions are cross cultural awareness and the extent to which economic benefits of tourism reach communities. </li></ul><ul><li>Where tour operators interact with locals: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Through purchasing and supplier choices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Viewing, photographing or talking to individuals engaged in work, social or cultural activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Visiting local businesses, markets </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using shared infrastructure such as transport, communications, entertainment, food services </li></ul></ul>
  • 24. Engaging With Local Communities <ul><li>What Tour Operators Can Do to Strengthen Community Relationships: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Consult with local communities to avoid sensitive sites; tourists should not overcrowd areas central to daily life for locals </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use local suppliers and labor to the greatest extent possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourage visitors to support local businesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn appropriate behavior and interpretation regarding heritage, culture and people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Become involved in community development projects </li></ul></ul>
  • 25. Spotlight: Kapawi Ecolodge and Reserve Located in southern Ecuadorian Amazon Basin, 70% of lodge staff are Achuar people; in 2011 it will transfer fully to local ownership. <ul><li>Established in 1993 as a joint initiative of the Canodros Foundation and the Federation of Achuar Indigenous People </li></ul><ul><li>Lodge products and services are purchased from local communities </li></ul><ul><li>Lodge presence has helped attract attention also of aid organizations who have brought health care, communication, transportation and education services to the area </li></ul>
  • 26. Wildlife Interactions <ul><li>The health, breeding, feeding patterns and overall population of wildlife are easily affected by humans. </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of direct (viewing, following activities) and indirect (loss of habitat, disruption or movement of prey) interactions. </li></ul><ul><li>Why Should I Care? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Wildlife is a significant tourist attraction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wildlife relocation and changes to breeding, nesting and feeding patterns reduce sightings for visitors </li></ul></ul>
  • 27. Wildlife Interactions <ul><li>What Tour Operators Can Do to Protect Wildlife </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inform and manage visitors by providing pre-tour information and keeping appropriate distances </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid known breeding or nesting sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid feeding and handling of wildlife </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimize disturbances from radios, phones, loud conversations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid nighttime wildlife viewing tours unless required in a conservation project </li></ul></ul>
  • 28. Vehicles and Vessels <ul><li>Most tours involve some type of vehicle. They can be loud and introduce pollutants from fuels into tropical forest environments. </li></ul><ul><li>Risks: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Erosion and topography changes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transport organisms and plants from one destination to another </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Noise, speed and appearance can frighten wildlife </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Congestion detracts from natural setting’s unique atmosphere </li></ul></ul>
  • 29. Vehicles and Vessels <ul><li>What Tour Operators Can Do: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporate active, low-impact modes of transport: cycling, kayaking, horseback riding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid sensitive sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stay on designated or defined roads </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep vehicles clean </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use fuel efficient vehicles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Consider fuel consumption when designing tour routes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sound proof vehicles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use low speeds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep engines well maintained </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep vehicle colors neutral </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimize use of toxic chemicals </li></ul></ul>
  • 30. Nature Walks, Hiking and Camping <ul><li>What is the Issue? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fragile soils; in steep terrain they are especially susceptible to compaction and erosion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Erosion affects the ability of native vegetation to regenerate and may result in sedimentation of waterways </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vegetation is affected when visitors remove plants, break off flowers and fruits, take souvenirs, collect firewood, clear areas for campsites </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Why should I care? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conserving the quality of the forest helps maintain the future viability of tourism businesses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Polluted and eroded environments are not attractive for visitors or local people </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Habitat degradation or conversion displaces and kills wildlife </li></ul></ul>
  • 31. Nature Walks, Hiking and Camping What Tour Operators Can Do: <ul><li>Improve your knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Inform and manage customers </li></ul><ul><li>Limit numbers of customers </li></ul><ul><li>Use established tracks and sites </li></ul><ul><li>Retain canopy cover </li></ul><ul><li>Remove all waste </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid open fires and smoking </li></ul><ul><li>Use batteries and fuel stoves </li></ul><ul><li>Clean all equipment and boots </li></ul>
  • 32. Spotlight: FreeWay Brazilian operator established to introduce people of Sao Paulo to the natural beauty of their country: <ul><li>Limits group sizes to minimize impacts </li></ul><ul><li>Groups stay on trails and rest only in sound areas such as rocks, sand or dry vegetation </li></ul><ul><li>Packs out all trash </li></ul><ul><li>Visitors educated not to touch rock formations, gather plants archaeological objects, shells or other natural products </li></ul>
  • 33. Archaeological Activities Excursions to archaeological sites or ruins may include viewing artifacts or getting involved in excavation and field activities. <ul><li>Risks: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Erosion and destabilization </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Destruction of remains and artifacts by poorly planned and managed excavation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Once exposed, areas are susceptible to damage from exposure to wind, water, sand flows, flora and fauna </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Particularly sensitive to small changes in temp and humidity caused by perspiration, body heat </li></ul></ul>
  • 34. Archaeological Activities <ul><li>Why Should I Care About the Risks? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Valuable and unique tourism attractions: can provide historical, scientific and cultural points of interest </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When sites are damaged the opportunity to educate and inspire visitors is lost, diminishing the value of the area and local employment opportunities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What Tour Operators Can Do: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Work with local stakeholders when planning to incorporate archaeological sites into tours </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Establish codes of conduct for visitors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Abide by established restrictions </li></ul></ul>
  • 35. Land Based Activities Common adventure activities: Cycling, mountain biking, horseback riding, rock climbing, caving. Wheels, hooves, ropes and hooks can damage creek beds, vegetation, rock and cave formations <ul><li>Impacts : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accelerated erosion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Introduction of foreign seeds and organisms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Climbing equipment can mar rock faces, over time wear away moss and other growth </li></ul></ul>
  • 36. Land-Based Activities <ul><li>Why Should I Care About the Risks? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Conserving unique landscapes helps preserve their quality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sustainable use supports long term business development, enhancing the destination’s onging appeal and marketability </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What Tour Operators Can Do: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inform and manage visitors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Focus adventure activities in non-sensitive sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stay on designated tracks and roads </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep animals clean and controlled - water by bucket or trough to avoid creekbed erosion, for example </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid intensive or constant use of an area </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep equipment clean </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remove all waste </li></ul></ul>
  • 37. Freshwater Recreation <ul><li>All can lead to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Over-fishing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pollution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Erosion at put-in and take-out spots </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Injury or disturbance to wildlife from collisions with craft or increases in turbidity from paddling/ propellers </li></ul></ul>Common activities: River tours, canoeing, tubing, kayaking, freshwater fishing, rafting -
  • 38. Freshwater Recreation <ul><li>Conservation maintains the resource’s viability for tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Healthy water systems maintain animal and human life in the forest </li></ul><ul><li>Clean environments with healthy and vegetated landscapes add to the appeal for visitors </li></ul>Why Should I Care?
  • 39. Freshwater Recreation <ul><li>What Tour Operators Can Do: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inform and manage visitors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be considerate of wildlife and know where your trips have the greatest likelihood of disturbing wildlife </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fish humanely - barb-less hooks, catch and release, minimal handling only with wet hands </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Choose anchoring and mooring locations carefully </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep watercraft clean! Don’t clean with chemicals while in the water. </li></ul></ul>
  • 40. Spotlight: Hamansai Adventure Dive Resort <ul><li>Recognized as an environmental leader in the hotel industry of Belize. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Located on 21 acres of rare coastal forest in Belize. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Visitors travel inland on jungle river canoeing & kayaking tours to view green and orange iguanas, parrots, toucans, herons, egrets, stingrays, manatees, crocodiles. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What They’re Doing: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reducing water consumption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reducing energy consumption </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minimizing trash generation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improving waste and water treatment </li></ul></ul>
  • 41. Performance Monitoring Why Bother? Performance monitoring allows you to track whether practices are improving your performance and helping you to progress towards achieving sustainability.
  • 42. How Should I Monitor? 1. Impact/threat Water Pollution 2. Objective(s) Manage wastewater 3. Goal Achieve 100% field compliance with water management policies by 2008 <ul><li>4. Good Practices </li></ul><ul><li>Inform visitors </li></ul><ul><li>Train staff </li></ul><ul><li>Monitor and record compliance </li></ul>4. Refer to A Practical Guide to Good Practices for Tropical Forest Based Tour Operators to find recommendations for good practices 1. Identify Impacts/ Threats 2. Define objective(s 3. Assign specific Goals
  • 43. Self Assessment Sustainability Checklist <ul><li>This is a sample from the complete checklist: </li></ul><ul><li>Hiking, Nature Walks and Camping </li></ul><ul><li>What actions do you take to help minimize erosion of landscapes and the removal of vegetation? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you keep tour numbers to 15 people or less for adventure activities? Y/N </li></ul><ul><li>Does your tour avoid highly sensitive sites? Y/N </li></ul><ul><li>On your tour, do you: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Utilize existing and defined roads, tracks, river and creek crossings and trails? Y/ N </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid clearing new tracks and camping sites?Y/N </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Focus on using areas which have site-hardening infrastructure (e.g. boardwalks, graveled paths, bird hides, designated camp sites)? Y/N </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Do you discourage the removal of plants, animals or rock formations? Y/ N </li></ul>
  • 44. Self Assessment Sustainability Checklist <ul><li>This is a sample from the complete checklist: </li></ul><ul><li>Waste Management and Disposal </li></ul><ul><li>What actions do you take to ensure proper waste management and disposal? </li></ul><ul><li>Do you provide visitors with waste disposal facilities? Y/N </li></ul><ul><li>Do you collect all waste generated during your tour and dispose of this waste outside of tropical forest areas? Y/N </li></ul><ul><li>Do you bury human waste (where no facilities are available) at least 15cm deep and at least 100m from any natural water bodies? Y/N </li></ul><ul><li>Do you purchase goods and supplies that generate minimum amounts of waste by: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Having minimal packaging? Y/N </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Being reusable? Y/N </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Being recyclable? Y/N </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 45. Feedback What did you think of this presentation? Please go to: http://www.questionpro.com/akira/takesurvey?id=773406 to complete a short survey and share your opinions.
  • 46. Thank you for taking part in the Tropical Forest-Based Tourism Webinar, brought to you by the ATTA. This presentation was sponsored by Conservation International. For suggestions or questions on Tropical Forest Practice Guide content, contact Conservation International (www.conservation.org): Neel Inamdar: n.inamdar@conservation.org Kathryn Kelly: [email_address] For more information on ATTA visit: www.adventuretravel.biz For more information on Christina Heyniger visit: www.xolaconsulting.com or www.travelofftheradar.com Photos in this document courtesy George McGuirk, Chris Doyle, Christina Heyniger Thank you!

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