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Social Media for Nonprofits - An Update for 2014
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Social Media for Nonprofits - An Update for 2014

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A presentation by David Gloss and Lansie Sylvia from Here's My Chance to discuss what social media platforms are best utilized for nonprofits in 2014 and beyond, and teach basic thru advanced …

A presentation by David Gloss and Lansie Sylvia from Here's My Chance to discuss what social media platforms are best utilized for nonprofits in 2014 and beyond, and teach basic thru advanced techniques to help every nonprofit tell its story with technology!

Published in: Social Media, Technology, Business

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  • Social media can be used to:Promote your cause, mission & visionRecruit volunteersCreate “buzz” for a special eventSell tickets for special eventsSupport your other communicationsSocial media is NOT the ideal forum for fundraising!
  • Users of your social media:Staff & Board of DirectorsStakeholders & ClientsFunders & Donors“Write everything as if your grandmother is reading it.” -Ensure that there isn’t anything online that will compromise your agency’s reputation of prohibit it from receiving funding. Remember, your social media must be consistent with your other communications. -Don’t trust “just anyone” to create your social media. -Tone and voice must be consistent with your ORGANIZATION, not the person who is responsible for generating content
  • What is the primary goal? Secondary goal? -Exposure? Fundraising? Getting volunteers?What is success, and how will you measure it? -Specific benchmarks and outcomes -When will you measure it? Who will you present results to?Who will be creating and managing your content? -Is one person responsible for content, or many? -Have you given this person “permission” to spend the amount of time needed to create an effective and impactful program?Who is your “cheerleader” for this program? -Who will support the staff members responsible for the social media program? What Board members will review the work and support it? Who are your Board advocates that can help other Board members understand the value-added by such a program? What funders would be interested in moving this program forward?What will your primary brand name be? -Need to keep CONSISTANT across all platforms -Example: For EHL Consulting, we use either EHLConsulting, or EHLconsultGRP
  • What is the primary goal? Secondary goal? -Exposure? Fundraising? Getting volunteers?What is success, and how will you measure it? -Specific benchmarks and outcomes -When will you measure it? Who will you present results to?Who will be creating and managing your content? -Is one person responsible for content, or many? -Have you given this person “permission” to spend the amount of time needed to create an effective and impactful program?Who is your “cheerleader” for this program? -Who will support the staff members responsible for the social media program? What Board members will review the work and support it? Who are your Board advocates that can help other Board members understand the value-added by such a program? What funders would be interested in moving this program forward?What will your primary brand name be? -Need to keep CONSISTANT across all platforms -Example: For EHL Consulting, we use either EHLConsulting, or EHLconsultGRP
  • Google AnalyticsGoogle AlertsSocial Media PolicyWhat if there are hecklers?Picking the right channels for YOUAnswering Keisha’s question on boundaries and toneAnswering Sonia’s question on free resources
  • Blogs vs. News FeedsVary length of blog depending on CONTENTThe best place for “humblebrags”Talk about your new grant, your new awardToot your own horn, and do so LOUDLY!Post project updates, personal stories, letters from the EDBest practices: one post per week, or when you have FRESH contentBeginner: “Donate now” button at the bottom of every postGo into previous posts and add a “Donate now” button at the bottom of every postBlog users should always have an easy way to giveIntermediate: Guest PostingGuest blogging allows you to position yourself as an authority and well-known name in your sector, as well as gain traffic back to your website.Looking for blogs whose content is focused on your sector, whose audience will be interested in your industry, has engaged readership, and is active on social media.Pitch your guest posts and recruit others to post on yours as reciprocity. Advanced: Search Engine Optimization (SEO)Optimize your blog titles and meta-tagsUse Google to understand best blog topics and capitalize on keyword trendsImplement social bookmarking and sharing on all of your blog posts
  • Best used for broadcasting and feedback, not fundraisingBeginner: Post the right contentAsk open-ended questions and respond when possibleAlways stoke conversation between you and the fan as well as fan-to-fanPost at least once a day or as often as your organization has fresh contentVary content: some text, some pictures, some videoIntermediate: Engage your baseDo NOT over-share (too many times per day) and do NOT be too promotional Highlight good work that complimentary orgs are doing as well as your own“Personal updates” are okay! Post that picture of the new computer, an April Fool’s Day joke, etc. It’s important to connect the PEOPLE who are doing the work with the organization as well. Extra credit: showing your org volunteering or donating to another org. Practice what you preach! This increases reputation when YOU make the ask for volunteers or financial donations. Extra credit: when a fan expresses needs for your services or products, take that conversation “off line” and provide a “warm intro” to the proper channel. For example, if you are a food pantry, and a fan expresses that they’ve had a hard time making ends meet, message them on Facebook to get their email address, then send an intro email to your client services department introducing the fan and connecting them with your services. Advanced: Customized cover photosCustomized cover photos offer your fans on Facebook the opportunity to help you promote your mission, event, or upcoming campaignYou’ll need to have the right photos, plus some basic graphic design skillsIf using Stock Photos, always buy, never borrowEnsure resolution and size are correctFor infographics, use a compelling photo overlaid with a strong statisticAlways include your logo, and website if possible
  • First one is City Year in BostonSecond is Human Rights Campaign
  • Best used for PR, events & calls-to-actionBeginner: Use “Twitter-speak”Use a friendly, somewhat informal tone/voice Shortening hyperlinks – bitly, tweeting from contentAlways RT with commentary before the RT procedure, when possibleUnderstanding hashtagsOptimize your profile: should contain the name of your organization, relevant keywords and a url to your site or blogIntermediate: Timing is everything!Automating posts with HootSuiteUse “Google Alerts” to your advantageMorning commute, lunch, evening commuteWorking Twitter into your day; using the Pomodoro TechniqueReplying to tweets with purposeAdvanced: Live-Tweeting eventsFind out what industry-specific Twitter meetings are relevant to your industry and engage in them – these are called “Twitter hangouts”For real-world events and conferences, use event-specific hashtags and tweet quotes from relevant industry events and fundraisersFollow, RT & schmooze with influencers in your sectorUse DM function to offer and meet IRL at event
  • Best used for publicity, reputation building & and volunteer engagementExamples: Flickr, Facebook Albums, InstagramBeginner: Permissions & WatermarksFirst things first: photo/video permissionsQuantity vs. QualityIntermediate: Event Photo Booths Set up specific “photo booths” at your events; can be as simple as a volunteer with a camera, or as sophisticated as hiring a photo booth company Extra credit: secure sponsor for photo booth, and put their logo on all final pictures as well as your ownAdvanced: Best Practices for InstagramHow visual is your work?Curated vs. “On the Go”Who has access to the account?
  • Best used for publicity, reputation building & and volunteer engagementExamples: Flickr, Facebook Albums, InstagramBeginner: Permissions & WatermarksFirst things first: photo/video permissionsQuantity vs. QualityIntermediate: Event Photo Booths Set up specific “photo booths” at your events; can be as simple as a volunteer with a camera, or as sophisticated as hiring a photo booth company Extra credit: secure sponsor for photo booth, and put their logo on all final pictures as well as your ownAdvanced: Best Practices for InstagramHow visual is your work?Curated vs. “On the Go”Who has access to the account?
  • Best used for publicity, reputation building & and volunteer engagementExamples: Flickr, Facebook Albums, InstagramBeginner: Permissions & WatermarksFirst things first: photo/video permissionsQuantity vs. QualityIntermediate: Event Photo Booths Set up specific “photo booths” at your events; can be as simple as a volunteer with a camera, or as sophisticated as hiring a photo booth company Extra credit: secure sponsor for photo booth, and put their logo on all final pictures as well as your ownAdvanced: Best Practices for InstagramHow visual is your work?Curated vs. “On the Go”Who has access to the account?
  • Best used for publicity, reputation building & and volunteer engagementExamples: Flickr, Facebook Albums, InstagramBeginner: Permissions & WatermarksFirst things first: photo/video permissionsQuantity vs. QualityIntermediate: Event Photo Booths Set up specific “photo booths” at your events; can be as simple as a volunteer with a camera, or as sophisticated as hiring a photo booth company Extra credit: secure sponsor for photo booth, and put their logo on all final pictures as well as your ownAdvanced: Best Practices for InstagramHow visual is your work?Curated vs. “On the Go”Who has access to the account?
  • Costs: free events vs. paidMost ticketing companies let you use the platform for free if the event is freeWhen the event is paid, ticketing sites will take a percentage or a flat-fee per ticket, plus processing costsAlways call them! Many companies will offer a discount/waive some of their fees in exchange for event sponsorshipBenefit? Information and access! You know who is attending, and attendees can promote your event to their own social networksMost ticketing sites also distribute weekly event reminders to their mailing lists, so you may benefit from “free” promotionExamples: TicketLeap, EventBrite, MeetUpBeginner: Test free event platformsFor your next free event, try to use a ticketing platform, and track whether you receive more RSVPs or interactionThen, compare and contrast with other ticketing sites to find out which one works best for youIntermediate: Link Facebook eventsOnce you feel comfortable using ticketing sites, begin to post events on Facebook, always including a ticketing linkAdvanced: Ticket GiveawaysUse Twitter and Facebook to do promotional ticket giveawaysUse promo codes for key volunteers to distribute
  • Transcript

    • 1. Nonprofits & Social Media in 2014: Telling Your Story with Technology Wednesday, April 10th, 2013 Avrum D. Lapin & J. Lansing Sylvia @HMCTwit #nonprofitPHL
    • 2. Here’s My Chance A Creative Agency for Good • A Full-Service Nonprofit Resource – Nonprofit Communication Planning – Social Media Strategy – Graphic Design & Data Visualization – Website Design & Development – Fundraising & Campaign Design – Videos & Visual Storytelling – Market Research & Advertising – Leadership Development & Pitch Training • We have worked with 40+ nonprofits. www.heresmychance.com
    • 3. Why Use Social Media? • Social media can be used to: – Promote your cause, mission & vision – Recruit volunteers – Create “buzz” for special events – Sell tickets for special events – Support your other communications • Social media is NOT the ideal forum for fundraising! www.heresmychance.com
    • 4. Who Are You Talking To? • Define Your Target Audience • Who are the Key Users? – Staff & Board of Directors – Stakeholders & Clients – Funders & Donors • “Write everything as if your grandmother (or Board chair) is reading it.” • Remember, your social media must be consistent with your other communications. www.heresmychance.com
    • 5. Key Questions to Ask Before You Start a Social Media Program • • • • • What is the primary goal? Secondary goal? What is success, and how will you measure it? Who will be creating and managing your content? Is there a chain of command for content approval? What will your primary brand name be? www.heresmychance.com
    • 6. Pick Your Tools Wisely: Average Weekly Time Commitment Social Media Tool Hours per Week to Be Effective Facebook + Twitter 10 Photo + Video 5-10 Blogging 10-15 Niche Networks + Commenting 5 Crowdfunding 10-20 Events + Ticketing 5 TOTAL 45-65 hrs. per week Adapted from Heather Mansfield’s “Social Media for Social Good” www.heresmychance.com
    • 7. A Strong Foundation • • • • • • Google Analytics Google Alerts Social Media Policy Personal Content vs. Agency Content What if there are hecklers? Picking the right channels for YOU www.heresmychance.com
    • 8. Blogging: Creating a Home for Content • • • • Blogs vs. News Feeds Best place for “humblebrags” Beginner: “Donate now” buttons Intermediate: Search Engine Optimization (SEO) • Advanced: Reciprocal Guest Posting & Commenting www.heresmychance.com
    • 9. Nonprofits on Facebook: Your Second Website • Best used for broadcasting and feedback, not fundraising • Beginner: Post the right content • Intermediate: Engage your base • Advanced: Customized cover photos & infographics/info-photos www.heresmychance.com
    • 10. Nonprofits on Facebook: Cover Photo Examples www.heresmychance.com
    • 11. Nonprofits on Facebook: Info-Photo Example www.heresmychance.com
    • 12. Connecting via Twitter: Engaging New Brand Advocates • Best used for publicity, events & calls-to-action • Beginner: Use “Twitter-speak” & Live-Tweeting events/conferences • Intermediate: Timing is everything! • Advanced: Content Strategy & Infographics www.heresmychance.com
    • 13. Nonprofits on Twitter: Infographics Examples www.heresmychance.com
    • 14. Picture Sharing: Worth a Thousand Words • Best used for publicity, reputation building & volunteer engagement • Examples: Flickr, Facebook Albums, Instagram • Beginner: Permissions & Watermarks • Intermediate: Event Photo Booths • Advanced: Going Offline with Photo Albums www.heresmychance.com
    • 15. Picture Sharing: Photo Booth Example www.heresmychance.com
    • 16. Video Sharing: Virality is Key • Best used for brand building, showcasing services & creating an org’s “personality” • Google loves video content! • Examples: Vine, Instagram Videos, Vimeo • Beginner: Promoting Events • Intermediate: “Day in the Life” Content • Advanced: Basic Explainer Videos www.heresmychance.com
    • 17. Video for Nonprofits: Explainer Video Example www.heresmychance.com
    • 18. Ticketing Sites: Leveraging Reputation Currency • • • • • • Costs: free events vs. paid Benefit? Information and access! Examples: TicketLeap, EventBrite, MeetUp Beginner: Test free event platforms Intermediate: Link Facebook events Advanced: Ticket giveaways www.heresmychance.com
    • 19. Final Thoughts + Q&A Social channels offer new and engaging ways to connect with stakeholders, and this messaging tactic can be approached thoughtfully and strategically to yield the greatest results. Questions? Comments? Success stories? www.heresmychance.com
    • 20. Our website: www.heresmychance.com Lansie’s email: lansie@heresmychance.com Dave’s email: dave@heresmychance.com Facebook: Twitter: www.facebook.com/hmc2011 @HMCTwit
    • 21. Copyright © Lansie Sylvia 2014 All Rights Reserved. No part of this presentation or associated documentation may be reproduced without written consent from the author. www.heresmychance.com