Marketing Of Digital Libraries

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Marketing of Digital Libraries - I presented this presentation in a guest lecture for students from the University of Leiden, the Netherlands. [December 3rd, 2009 - National Library of the Netherlands]

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  • Digital library services today Digital library services today aren’t good enough. They are build upon the legacy of our physical libraries. => sheet carriage with an engine => should look like a hybrid car.They needed a steering wheel , so they put a steering wheel in the middle of the car. Nevertheless: customer service has a future . At the short term libraries can add value in a world with an abundance of information. A lot of parallels with the discussion about the future of newspapers, but I doubt whether they are making the right choices (less service). Q: Do you agree that our digital services today can be improved? Another reason why we shouldn’t market digital libraries. Digital content today As libraries we publish millions of metadata on the Internet; the amount of fulltext is limited yet. The added value of metadata for customers is limited; in the Netherlands only we have 70 million holdings in our libraries. Of course it is important for libraries to have their holdings visible in services like Worldcat. But what customers need is information f.e. about availability, suggestions for alternatives etc. Again a reason to improve in the short term our services. In the meantime we have to stimulate digitization, work on digital preservation and make deals with publishers in order to give legal access tot copyright material. If Google (Google-Books) and Apple can do it (I-tunes), libraries can do it. Example: Europeana, cross domain digital heritage. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Q: Any idea why I chose this video? Think different (Apple) is the keyword for change [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • This quote is from Darwin, who is responsible for a big change in thinking about evolution. “ It’s not the strongest of the species that survive, not the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change” (Darwin’s law) Apple is an example of a company that shows responsive to change. I will come back to that later in my presentation. Q: Is there a sense of urgency for libraries to change? In the eyes of many people worldwide a Library = books A digital library = Google Google organizes the ‘worlds information’. The slogan of the British Library is “the worlds knowledge”. What’s the difference. If libraries want to play a role in the world of digital information something has to change . Adding the word ‘digital’ to libraries isn’t helping. ‘ Digital’ in the 21st century is what ‘Electricity’ is since the industrial revolution. It has become a commodity for products and services; useful but not an aspect where you make the difference. Every car has an engine… We have to admit that Google was smarter than all the libraries (and most organizations) together started organizing the world’s information. As a result they created a new utility ‘search’ and in fact the new marketing rules. And as libraries we have to deal with the effect that in the world Google is a synonym for a digital library. Google forces libraries to think as a business. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Q: What business is Kodak in? They moved from film (atoms) to bits & bytes. They moved from sales to service. But they did realize too late that they are in de business of pictures and memories . [speaker notes from ‘What Would Google Do?’ / Jeff Jarvis]
  • The business of Kokak was the business of pictures, emotions, memories. Now Yahoo bought the succesfull picture and communityservice Flickr. When I say ‘photos’, you think of Flickr, Picasa or your iPhone where you can take pictures with. Nobody thinks of Kodak anymore. [speaker notes from ‘What Would Google Do?’ / Jeff Jarvis]
  • What business are libraries in? The business of informa tion is growing increasingly competitive. Libraries face increasing competition in the information marketplace. Many users perceive the internet as providing everything they need online. When people go looking for an answer and find it via a Google/search/click they often don´t know where they have landed and who gave them their answer. It is not a surprise that they believe Google found it for them. Google diluted our library brand. Branding is perception, as I will show you later on. But the result is that the perception exists in the mind of many consumers that information, whether quality information or not, may be obtained more affordably or more easily from other sources than the library. Libraries need to think as a business . But in what business are we in? Books? Libraries are associated with books. Nothing wrong with it. The older they are the more value they create (for users as well as libraries). Content/information? If information is our business, what value do we add if the whole world is happy with the way Google is servicing that. This implicates access to free information is no longer the domain of libraries only. At what point libraries can make the difference? Licensed content? Digital preservation? KB is aiming to become the preferred supplier for digital information in the Netherlands and is investing in digital preservation. At the long term it will definitely add value, but in the short term it doesn’t add a lot of value in the eyes of customers Services? Service is something that will last forever. There is more choice in service than ever before (do it yourself, standard or tailermade). Customer service is the new marketing. That is where people talk about! As librarians we are champions in servicing . Are we? If yes, we can make the difference in the short and long term! [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Where is Everyone? Published: April 27, 2009 – by Thomas Baekdal http://www.baekdal.com/articles/Management/market-of-information/ These days, everyone is trying to figure out how to connect with other people. It used to be simple, you just placed some ads in whatever newspaper that was most suited to your product, but now that world is becoming ever more irrelevant. So how do you connect with other people today? And more importantly, how do you do it tomorrow? In this article, we are going to take a little tour through the history of information, or more specifically, where to focus your efforts if you want get in touch with other people. It is a really exciting time, because we are currently in the middle of the most drastic change since the invention of the newspaper. We are seeing an entirely new way for people to interact. One that makes all traditional ways seem silly. It is a fundamental shift, and it will completely change the world as we know it. And the best thing about it is that you get to help make it happen. So join me on this (unscientific) tour of the last 210 years of information + 10 more years into the future. But before we start to explore the future, let's explore how we got here. Let's go back to 1800 - back when information was nothing like what we have today... [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • 1800 - The face to face period In the 1800, the only way you could really interact with other people was to go out and meet them. It was all about face-to-face communication. If you wanted to sell a product, you would go to the local marketplace, where you would setup a stand. But this also meant that the only way for you to get information - or to give information back - was to be at the right place at the right time. You didn't really know what happened in another part of the city, nor could you sell your products to people in another place. Some people did talk about this new thing called the newspaper. But it wasn't really the same. You had to meet people in person. That was the only good way to interact. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • 1900 - Read all about it! By the year 1900, the newspapers and magazine had revolutionized how we communicated. Now we could get news from places we have never been. We could communicate our ideas to people we had never seen. And we could sell our products to people far away. You still had to go out to talk other people, but you could stay on top of things, without leaving the city. It was amazing. It was the first real revolution of information. The world was opening up to everyone. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • 1960 - We will be right back after these messages During the next 60 years the newspapers dominated our lives. If you wanted to get the latest news, or tell people about your product, you would turn to the newspapers. It seemed like newspapers would surely be the dominant source of information for all time to come. Except that during the 1920s a new information source started to attract people's attention - the Radio. Suddenly you could listen to another person's voice 100 of miles away. But most importantly, you could get the latest information LIVE. It was another tremendous evolution is the history of information. By 1960's the two dominant sources of information was LIVE news from the Radio and the more detailed news via newspapers and magazines. It was really great times, although some meant that "The way for newspapers to meet the competition of radio is simply to get out better papers", an argument that we would hear repeatedly for the next 50 years. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • 1990 - Tune in Tomorrow During the next 40 years a new technical revolution, the television, was introduced. It started to real get public interest in the 1950s, and by the year 1990 it was huge. It had surpassed the newspapers and magazines, and it was slowly obliterating the radio. Now people could not only hear information, they could also see it. The 1970s-1990s was also the time where the newspaper executives were realizing that something was going terrible wrong with their market. They have had many problems with competing with radio, but the TV was in a different league. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • 1998 - The dawn of the Internet Only 8 years later, television is ruling the world, radio is almost reduced to ‘a place where you listen to free music' and newspapers are doing everything they can to stay relevant. But the constant evolution of technology plows ahead with never before seen determination. A new phenomenon is looming in the shadows - the Internet. 1998 was the year when the internet changed from being a geeky place that had little relevance, to ‘every company needs to have a website'. The revolution had started 3 years earlier, but in 1998 it reached critical mass and caught everyone's attention. It still wasn't used much, and most people didn't have access to it, but everyone agreed that it was the future. It was the dawn of a new era. It was a place where everyone could get information from everywhere - at least in theory . People also started to realize that the internet was more than just information. You could give something back. You could join the conversation. You could be a part of the experience instead of just a spectator. And most importantly, you could choose what you wanted to do, when you wanted to do it - a concept that hadn't been possible since the 1800. The possibilities of the internet were just mindboggling. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • 2004 - I decide what to do! In 2004, only 6 years later, the internet had revolutionized how we approach information. Televisions and newspapers still dominated our news sources, but the new world was definitely online. In 2004 everyone was making new websites. People were exploring the world of web applications, and online workflows. People could do an incredible amount of things, and participate in so many areas, that a new concept appeared - information overload. For the first time in our lives we were being exposed to more information than we could consume. In the age of newspapers we had to choose what we wanted to see. But in 2004 we had to choose what we didn't want to see. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • 2004 - I decide what to do! (2) This had a devastating effect on the traditional forms of information. In the past, you could get people's attention simply by making something. People wanted more choices, so you simply had to give them another choice. But in 2004 this changed. People started to have enough, and now you actually had to make something better. It was not enough that it was different. 2004 was also year when a new phenomenon started to take off - Social Networking. The concept had been slowly gaining ground with the concept of blogs. It was an easy, simple and affordable way for everyone to share their ideas. And you could post a comment. For the first time, everyone could create their own sphere of information without doing ‘technical things'. Information changed from being tools for the professionals, to a tool for everyone to use. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1569514,00.html Time's Person of the Year: You By LEV GROSSMAN Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2006 The "Great Man" theory of history is usually attributed to the Scottish philosopher Thomas Carlyle, who wrote that "the history of the world is but the biography of great men." He believed that it is the few, the powerful and the famous who shape our collective destiny as a species. That theory took a serious beating this year. To be sure, there are individuals we could blame for the many painful and disturbing things that happened in 2006. The conflict in Iraq only got bloodier and more entrenched. A vicious skirmish erupted between Israel and Lebanon. A war dragged on in Sudan. A tin-pot dictator in North Korea got the Bomb, and the President of Iran wants to go nuclear too. Meanwhile nobody fixed global warming, and Sony didn't make enough PlayStation3s. But look at 2006 through a different lens and you'll see another story, one that isn't about conflict or great men. It's a story about community and collaboration on a scale never seen before. It's about the cosmic compendium of knowledge Wikipedia and the million-channel people's network YouTube and the online metropolis MySpace. It's about the many wresting power from the few and helping one another for nothing and how that will not only change the world, but also change the way the world changes. The tool that makes this possible is the World Wide Web. Not the Web that Tim Berners-Lee hacked together (15 years ago, according to Wikipedia) as a way for scientists to share research. It's not even the overhyped dotcom Web of the late 1990s. The new Web is a very different thing. It's a tool for bringing together the small contributions of millions of people and making them matter. Silicon Valley consultants call it Web 2.0, as if it were a new version of some old software. But it's really a revolution. And we are so ready for it. We're ready to balance our diet of predigested news with raw feeds from Baghdad and Boston and Beijing. You can learn more about how Americans live just by looking at the backgrounds of YouTube videos—those rumpled bedrooms and toy-strewn basement rec rooms—than you could from 1,000 hours of network television. And we didn't just watch, we also worked. Like crazy. We made Facebook profiles and Second Life avatars and reviewed books at Amazon and recorded podcasts. We blogged about our candidates losing and wrote songs about getting dumped. We camcordered bombing runs and built open-source software. America loves its solitary geniuses—its Einsteins, its Edisons, its Jobses—but those lonely dreamers may have to learn to play with others. Car companies are running open design contests. Reuters is carrying blog postings alongside its regular news feed. Microsoft is working overtime to fend off user-created Linux. We're looking at an explosion of productivity and innovation, and it's just getting started, as millions of minds that would otherwise have drowned in obscurity get backhauled into the global intellectual economy. Who are these people? Seriously, who actually sits down after a long day at work and says, I'm not going to watch Lost tonight. I'm going to turn on my computer and make a movie starring my pet iguana? I'm going to mash up 50 Cent's vocals with Queen's instrumentals? I'm going to blog about my state of mind or the state of the nation or the steak-frites at the new bistro down the street? Who has that time and that energy and that passion? The answer is, you do. And for seizing the reins of the global media, for founding and framing the new digital democracy, for working for nothing and beating the pros at their own game, TIME's Person of the Year for 2006 is you. Sure, it's a mistake to romanticize all this any more than is strictly necessary. Web 2.0 harnesses the stupidity of crowds as well as its wisdom. Some of the comments on YouTube make you weep for the future of humanity just for the spelling alone, never mind the obscenity and the naked hatred. But that's what makes all this interesting. Web 2.0 is a massive social experiment, and like any experiment worth trying, it could fail. There's no road map for how an organism that's not a bacterium lives and works together on this planet in numbers in excess of 6 billion. But 2006 gave us some ideas. This is an opportunity to build a new kind of international understanding, not politician to politician, great man to great man, but citizen to citizen, person to person. It's a chance for people to look at a computer screen and really, genuinely wonder who's out there looking back at them. Go on. Tell us you're not just a little bit curious. Read more: http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1569514,00.html#ixzz0YL8UXR8L
  • 2007 - Me too 3 years later the social element if the internet showed just how powerful the voice of the people really is. The TV was from the first time no longer the primary source of information, and newspapers are struggling to survive. Everyone wanted to create their own little world, and connect it with their friends. But 2007 was also the turning point for the traditional websites. It was once the most important change, but now people compared the traditional websites to newspapers - a static and passive form of information. We wanted active information. We wanted to be a part of it, not just looking at it. The blogs also started to get in trouble. Just as TV had eliminated radio (because it was better and richer way to give people LIVE information) so are social networks eliminating blogs. A social profile is a more active way for people to share what they care about. Social networks are simply the best tool for the job, and the blogs could not keep up. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • 2009 - Everything is Social 2 years later, today, the new internet is completely dominating our world. The newspapers are dead in the water, and people are watching less TV than ever. The new king of information is everyone, using social networking tools to connect and communicate. Even the traditional website is dying from the relentless force of the constant stream of rich information from the social networks. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • In the past 210 years we have seen an amazing evolution of information. We could: Get information from distant places Get it LIVE See it LIVE Get to decide when to see something, and what to see Allow us to take part, and comment. Publish our own information ...and in 2009... be the information. But 2009 is also going to be the start of the next revolution. Because everything we know is about to change. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • The Future The first and most dramatic change is the concept of Social News . Social news is quickly taking over our need for staying up-to-date with what goes on in the world. News is no longer being reported by journalists, now it comes from everyone . And it is being reported directly from the source to you - bypassing the traditional media channels. But social news is much more than that. It is increasingly about getting news directly from the people who makes it. Instead of having a journalist reporting what some analyst are saying, you hear it from the analyst herself. Social news is about getting news from the source, directly, and unfiltered. A new wave of entertainment is emerging (the light blue and purple areas), one dominated by the games, video and audio streams. Instead of tuning into a TV channel, you decide what to see and when to see it. We are no longer subscribing to a channel, where someone else decides what you can see. You decide and control everything about the experience. And a new concept in the form of targeted information is slowly emerging . We are already seeing an increasing number of services on mobile phones, where you can get information for the area that you are in. E.g. instead of showing all the restaurants in the world, you will only get a list of the restaurants in your area. This is something that is going to explode into in the years to come. In the world where we have access to more information that we can consume, getting only the relevant parts is going to be a very important element . And, this will expand far beyond the simple geo-targeting that we see today. 2020 - Traditional is dead In the next 5-10 years, the world of information will change quite a bit. All the traditional forms of information are essentially dead . The traditional printed newspapers no longer exists, television in the form of preset channels is replaced by single shows that you can watch whenever you like. Radio shows is replaced podcasts and vodcasts. The websites have a much lesser role, as their primary function will be to serve as a hub for all the activities that you do elsewhere. It is the place where people get the raw material for use in other places . And the websites and social networks will merge into one. Your website and blog is your social profile . Social news, as described previously, is going to be the most important way that people communicate . The traditional journalistic reporting is by now completely replaced getting information directly from the source. Everyone is a potential reporter, but new advances in targeting will eliminate most of the noise. The journalists will turn into editors who, instead of reporting the news, bring it together to give us a bigger picture. The news stream of the future will be personalized to each individual person, and is constantly adjusting what you see - much the same way as Last.fm is doing today with music. Everything will incorporate some form of targeting. You will be in control over every single bit of information that flows your way. In 2010, two new concepts will start to emerge. One of them is intelligent information, where information streams can combine bits from many different news sources. Not just by pulling data, but summarizing it, breaking it apart and extracting the valuable parts. Instead of reading 5 different articles on the same topic, you will be presented with one, highlighting the vital point of interest. The world information is also going to be available almost everywhere . The concept of having to get the paper, sit in front of your TV, or look at your computer, will be long gone. Information will not be something you have to get. It comes to you, wherever you are, in whatever situation you happen to be in. In the same way, information will not be something you ‘consume' a certain times - like you did with prime-time on TVs. The information stream will be a natural part of every second of your life. It is not something you get, it is something you have. The static and controlled forms of information that we see today will soon be a thing of the past. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • [by Thomas Baekdal]
  • In the past 210 years we have seen an amazing evolution of information. We could: Get information from distant places Get it LIVE See it LIVE Get to decide when to see something, and what to see Allow us to take part, and comment. Publish our own information ...and in 2009... be the information. But 2009 is also going to be the start of the next revolution. Because everything we know is about to change. [speaker notes by Thomas Baekdal]
  • Branding is the consumers’ continuing expression of loyalty to a product, service or company Branding is traditional an important part of marketing, but what is a brand? [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • There are many definitions, but they have one thing in common: it’s about perception. Example: OCLC Report on Library Perceptions and Information Resources (www.oclc.org/reports/2005perceptions.htm) [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • What are the strengths of today’s library brand? Worldwide reputation Reliability/trust Quality And the weaknesses? [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • And the weaknesses? Just books dusty Just a physical place [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Should we brand libraries or our organizations? Should we brand libraries or digital libraries? In the businessmarket we can brand our organizations, but in the consumermarket I truly believe in marketing libraries instead of marketing digital libraries. If we are worldwide known, why aren’t we in the top100 of global brands? [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Since 2007 Google is the number one brand in the world (Millward Brown BrandZ top 100) Brand is no guarantee. Customers have a variety of choices, they know what there options are as never before and have a lot more to consider than brand. This causes an erosion of loyalty and brandswitching . Today, brand loyalty is virtual and many consumers will choose a brand for pragmatic rather than emotional reasons. What about realiability/trust? Again no guarantee . Over the past decades we have seen traditionally trusted en reliable ‘service brands’, lose consumers’ unqualified trust. Think of what happened to banks recently. Why is branding import than for libraries? This brings me to marketing. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Strategic marketing Q: What have these brands in common? Most online brands we recognize today will vanish within the next decade. It’s easy for online companies to establish customer access; the hard part is spending the time and money to build the sustainable infrastructure to maintain a persistent presence in the marketplace . This is an opportunity for libraries; we have a footprint in society! And another reason to market libraries. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • 4 P’s translated to customer orientation (SIVA-model) Product->Solution Promotion->Information Price->Value Placement->Access http://promotiemarketing.blogspot.com/2008/04/van-4-ps-20e-eeuw-naar-4cs-21e-eeuw.html: Product >> Consumenten Oplossing (Consumer solution) Prijs >> Kosten voor Consument (Cost to Consumer) Plaats >> Gemak (Convenience) Promotie >> Communicatie (Communication) Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marketing
  • But marketing is ‘under construction’ as well. Q: What causes this? Total Access (anytime, any place, anyhow) has changed the role of marketing as a profession enourmous. Total Access means choice, and an unrestrained doorway to variety, price, novelty and service. This means more channels and changing roles within the traditional chain between producer and consumer. To respond to this new marketplace, marketing is no longer an activity of one person or department. Marketing is becomibg a part of the definition of every manager’s responsibility. Market leaders of the future need to understand both the customer and the technology. Successful marketing is therefore very IT depending. The organizations on the sheet apply the new marketingrules successfully. What are these rules? In the next part of my presentation I will focus on the most important marketingtrends and show how libraries can benefit of it. It is build around the marketing theory of the 7 P’s, used in service industries and knowledge-intensive environments. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Product Give customers control This is one of the most difficult aspects for libraries, because we think that we know what is good for the customer. But customers no longer need companies, institutions or government to organize things for them. They now have tools to organize themselves. What they need is no rules, but tools to manage and control their own choices. Example: My Library where I create my own collection, choose the services that fit me.. Stimulate Interactivity : Interaction leads to transaction and interactive customers are very powerful. Consumers become producers or co-creators of your services Example: Library of Congress/Flickr (40.000 tagged digitized pictures within one week) Although the architecture is complex, the purpose is to deliver a simple customer experience that disappears into the user’s intuitive behaviour pattern. The interface is so simple that the customer isn’t aware of the technology at all. Your competitor is just one click away. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Vraag die vooraf gaat aan marketing-beleid: wat verkopen wij? Antwoord: we verkopen services (dienstverlening), zoals het helpen bij het vinden van informatie, specifieke boeken (titels), levering van boeken. Om daar toegang toe te geven verkopen we bibliotheekpassen (=randvoorwaarde)
  • Vraag die vooraf gaat aan marketing-beleid: wat verkopen wij? Antwoord: we verkopen services (dienstverlening), zoals het helpen bij het vinden van informatie, specifieke boeken (titels), levering van boeken. Om daar toegang toe te geven verkopen we bibliotheekpassen (=randvoorwaarde)
  • Vraag die vooraf gaat aan marketing-beleid: wat verkopen wij? Antwoord: we verkopen services (dienstverlening), zoals het helpen bij het vinden van informatie, specifieke boeken (titels), levering van boeken. Om daar toegang toe te geven verkopen we bibliotheekpassen (=randvoorwaarde)
  • Wat willen we ‘marketen’? De organisatie (KB)? De content? Services (bijv levering)?
  • Partnering: Combine forces to achieve better services Growth will less come from owning assets inside one company than from enabling others in a network to build their own value , reducing their costs and spreading their risk. That is Google´s way, Apple’s way, but why shouldn´t libraries benefit from it as well? On this aspects libraries can improve. The focus is in my opinion too much on ‘searchtools’ and adding more information. Two areas in which Google seems to have set the standard. The number of projects in (especially research) libraries is enormous. Most of them are supply-driven, which means the library is ‘in control’ instead of the customer. Partnering/networking is important; for libraries it starts with partnering between libraries (research, public, national, special) and develop integrated digital services. Use the 80-20 Rule : share what you have in common, focus on the part where you make the difference. 80% of what you need for that has nothing to do with the type of customer your library is serving. Invest in a common digital infrastructure and focus on the 20% (niches) in which your library can make the difference and thus creates value. Think outside in! Open up and share at different levels: Data Between libraries (national, research, public) => Innovation with Effect In the local community (public + technical library,archive, artcenter) => DOK Delft => top 25 innovative libraries Employees Build a shared platform: Mass marketing is out. What replaces the mass? The aggregation of the long tail / the mass of the niches. Local libraries should focus on niches. Local marketing, based upon a `shared digital library platform’. Example: APPLE APPS! [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Place today can be anywhere. If you want to be found you have to think distributed In other to be found you have to open up (your data, network etc.), because you want to be distributed, than aggregated and than distributed again. You need to be where your customers are: Services/wdgets designed for mobile phones have the future. Example: Apple I Phone with Apple Apps [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • The hybrid library has the future The combination of both hard and soft channels is very powerful, but they need to be integrated. Tendency that organizations with only a webpresence seek ‘evidence’ in the real world=> Apple Stores. This is a big advantage for libraries. They have presence all over the world, with a lot of times prestiges buildings Customers form strong preferences based on persistent presence, whether that presence is physical or remote. Since sales of products and services on the Internet increases, shops become more and more a showroom for digital services. Example: DOK, Delft [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • The dimension of free: accessible instead free of charge Information should be ‘free’ according to Google, so far so good for libraries, because we plea for permanent free access to information. But because of Google we don’t make the difference anymore. As said before libraries should focus on services. People are prepared to pay for services. Offer choice; selfservice is free, on site service is free, but paying for remote access to useful information you can´t find with Google, why not… Publishers still earn money with licencees and for that reason they are not prepared to give open access. Libraries can help them to get more traffic by offering access to licensed information via their librarycard. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Promotion Think distributed , the traditional model sender=> receiver isn’t working anymore. In a time of over production of information a push-strategy works better than a pull. Be where your customers are; in their networks rather than having an own network. Be careful in choosing the communities you want to use. Facebook seems to be the most important community today for marketing purposes worldwide; 200 million users, open infrastructure, easy to use and easy for advertising. Look at the communities you service (people with like interests and needs). Don´t think that you can create a community. Communities are already doing what they do. If you are lucky they let you help them. The dialogue with customers becomes very important; customers want to be heard and are eager/willing to contribute. Use 1-1-communication. Create ambassadors/fans. Create fans, because customer loyalty is erosing. Example: Apple Every time a customer recommends you and your product to a friend it cost you nothing and the benefits are enormous. The opposite as well of course. It takes 5 times as much investment to obtain a new customer as it does to keep the current one. Combine online and offline promotion. Print is still alive and lasts longer. Persistent presence is a consumer’s consistent and reliable experience with a product/service at any time in any place. For libraries this means that the physical and virtual experience must synchronate. Again an intelligent information infrastructure is enabling this. Example: Shanachies (DOK), Elco (INCT) [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • The Future of Search is More than Social Published: Tuesday, November 10, 2009 in future » social-networking by Thomas Baekdal http://www.baekdal.com/future/Social-Networking/future-of-social-search/ As you probably know, both Google and Microsoft have entered into a partnership with Twitter and is now incorporating social search into their regular search engines. This is a big deal because social is a very important element of the future of search... it's not the only part though. When it comes to searching, a search engine is supposed to do one thing very well. Find stuff, from highly relevant and trustworthy sources, in relation to you as a person. Let me give you an example: Let's pretend that you live in Australia, and that you are looking to buy a new car. You might not know this, but the entire country of Australia is pretty much divided into three types of car owners. People who drive a Holden, people who drives a Ford, and other people who drive something else (yes I'm making a blatant generalization). But, here is the thing, the reason people drive a Ford over a Holden (or vise versa), isn't because the car is better. It is the result of the community that they are part of. Their friends drive a Ford, their Parents drive a Ford, and the annoying neighbor drives a Holden... so you also drive a Ford. It is the same with other types of products. If most of your friends use a Dell, then you are also very likely use one yourself. If your friends use Heinz Ketchup, then you will probably use the same brand. As human beings we are heavily influenced by what other people use, and depending on who those people are, the more likely we will be influenced by them. [text & image by Thomas Baekdal - http://www.baekdal.com/future/Social-Networking/future-of-social-search/]
  • So how does this relate to search? Well, so far, Google and Microsoft have based their searches on things, instead of people. If you searched for recipes for tomato soup, they would find the ones that were most popular by other sites, or their relation to the specific search query. And we get a pretty good result, but from generalized perspective. Twitter on the other hand is really good at people, or to be more precise, it could be good at it (it isn't really yet). But, Twitter covers what people close to you, in terms of influence, are talking about, and if you can combine that with Google's general results then you have something really spectacular. [text & image by Thomas Baekdal - http://www.baekdal.com/future/Social-Networking/future-of-social-search/]
  • So far Google has been really good at things, places, sites or pages, but it lacks relevance because it doesn't know people. Twitter have the people element (although Twitter search doesn't extract any meaning from it), same with Facebook, comments on blogs, reviews on product sites (from real people), rankings, and general activity. Combine all that and you got the future of search. It is not social, not traditional - but both + it's targeted to you. And it can be used for more than simply searching. [text & image by Thomas Baekdal - http://www.baekdal.com/future/Social-Networking/future-of-social-search/]
  • If you combine this targeted+personal+influenced+people+content+ranked search result (need a shorter word for that), then we would suddenly get some real answers. If you search for tomato soup, it will not just find the biggest sites, it will look at your social stream to see whether there are anyone there who are really good, and who has an opinion that matters to you. If you are following a person who is into food, then her opinion is ranked higher than just any regular website. But more important, it will not just look at the stream, but actually analyze it over time, It will extract what it is really about. It will compare that to many other algorithms, and finally match the content with you as a person. If you search for Ikea, not only would pages more relevant to you be ranked higher, but also, you would be able to see what people feel about the brand, the specific product, all ranked on how close that source is to you as a person. And, it is not just search that could use this. Google could create a people-rank API, so other sites like Tweetmeme could rank their content not only based how frequently it is retweeted, but also how it relates to you, and to other people. [text & image by Thomas Baekdal - http://www.baekdal.com/future/Social-Networking/future-of-social-search/]
  • Personnel Digital libraries is about people and passion. People can make the difference (positive and negative), especially in the services industry. Q: how can we prepare library employees for the digital future? It starts with creating new jobs and functions (IT-developers, database analists, databasemarketeers, informationmanagers, productmanagers). This will attract a new type of personnel on the one hand and creates employability on the other hand. My personal experience: it is hard for the majority of the librarians to make the switch towards digital. It’s is not a matter of not willing to change or lack of quality, but their ‘genes’ are simply too ‘blue’. A blue type needs >100% certainty and in the digital world nothing is certain. Education is therefore not the first thing one should think of. Solutions? At the KB we started with a traineegroup-program. The aim of the Traineegroup is twofold: the KB wishes to profile itself in this way as an attractive employer for young talent, and the trainee receives, thanks to the TP, extra chances for personal development. S timulating mobility/exchange programs is a great way to create awareness. After a short period of hesitation the employees got very enthousiastic about it. In order to be successful you need changemanagers. Within my division this approach has lead to success: in years 25% mobility; 20% of the fte is now available for digital services (was 7%). [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Efficient processes are very important in the online world. The big success of online bookshops like Amazon en Bol is due to the fact that they have a fabulous logistic system. One really can rely it. Processes and libraries, an unreclaimed area. Q: Why is that? If information is our ‘business’, we should excell in informationmanagement, but we don’t. If logistics in the digital world make the difference, we urgently need to look to our processes. f.e. ILL. Offering interactive services will a huge impact on the traditional library processes. If we allow tagging, open up our services for data customers can bring in... Selfservice is today pretty common in physical libraries, but the online services are still very poor. How many libraries allow online subscription, payment en remote access in 2 minutes. How many offer single sign on. The technique is available for years, but libraries hardly use it. Why is it so difficult? Again a reason to join forces and build a shared digital services platform. A shared digital library platform with shared services can bring relief, for the libraries as well for the customers. It is cost efficient and it gives opportunities to improves our services, which will lead to traffic/usage. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Physical Evidence What is the accountability of libraries. What do we give back to our subsidizers. Libraries are good in reporting on activities, but asking questions like ‘what is the cost/benefit, why are you doing this, what is the result, one gets questionmarks. Setting targets en reporting on results and key performance indicators is rare in the libraryworld (and more broaden the non profit sector). This is not a big issue yet, but I truly believe that it will be in the future, forced by the economic crisis. Why should governments keep investing in digitization and creation of digital libraries, where there is yet Google and an abundance of free information on the Internet. Pay for collections that won’t be used. The solution is simple for me. Manage libraries more businesslike. Set targets, gather facts and figures, benchmark yourself with libraries but also other information- or serviceproviders. The British Library did a good job indicating that they generate 363m pound each year for the UK economy. This is the equivalent to 4,40p to every 1p of public money. So far this initiative isn’t adopted by any other library in the world. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Vraag: verandert de doelgroep van de KB door de opkomst van internet? KB Online dienstenportfolio Op aantal punten anders dan doelgroep on site Vraag: waar zitten de verschillen in tussen online / on site? Gebruik is laagdrempeliger Op internet bedien je ook veel meer het brede publiek dat toevallig bij je langs komt
  • A MARKETING STRATEGY FOR LIBRARIES An example: Think as a business Set a target: Libraries part of the Top 100 Global Brands Focus on the organization of digital content (fulltext) and libraryservices and the exploitation of library buildings Think distributed : Open up our data, services and organizations Let’s build a shared digital library platform (service + content) = it meets 80% of the demand of library users = cost efficient Think outside in: Make locally the difference (niche marketing and services) = use the digital library platform as a backbone and integrate it with your local services. Think of the 20% customized services where you can make the difference = adding value 80 + 20 = 21st century library Marketing/Branding libraries worldwide this way = creating enormous value [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Results Shared digital library platform (content + services) + local presence/niche marketing = 21st Century Library. Goal/Reward./result: a position in the most valuable global brands (BrandZ top 100): nr 1 Google = 100$; nr 6 = Apple; nr 100 Lowe= 6$; compare: British Library = 0,5 million $) The 21st century Library = rejuvenated library brand with tremendous value for society, according to the rating in the BrandZ Top 100 If Apple can do it, we can do it! Success There is lot of literature about marketing libraries. I chose the titles from Kotler’s Top Picks for librarians (see http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/lcp/0801/lcp080131.html ). Total Access is about marketing in the world of Access Anywhere Anyplace Anyhow; Kotler’s book is more about marketingmanagement and the theory of 7 P’s. What would Google do? by Jeff Jarvis “ When we talk about the Google age we are talking about a new society. This new generation and its new worldview will change and how we see and interact with the world and how business, government and institutions interact with us. It’s is only just beginning” [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Summary of strategic marketingtrends useful for libraries Libraries worldwide struggle with the impact the shift from books towards digital information has on their organization. Despite of all the investments in digital services the librarybrand is still synonym for books. We have to admit that Google was smarter than all the libraries (and most organizations) together in starting organizing the world’s information. As a result they created a new utility ‘search’ and in fact the new marketing rules. Libraries have to deal with the effect that in the perception of many customers worldwide Google is a synonym for a digital library. We simply can’t compete with that and it forces us to stick to the brand ‘library’ and ‘books’. But in my opinion that is no problem at all if more libraries embrace the new marketing rules. Obeying the rules of the new age, libraries are able reload their brand with offering new digital services. Libraries must view and approach marketing as an integrated enterprise activity, and, like all other aspects of the enterprise, marketing must become a network of coordinated information and responsibilities. It’s demanding the skills and talents of many functions, departments and people and is very IT-depended. Partnering/networking is important; for libraries it starts with partnering between libraries (research, public, national, special) and develop integrated digital services. 80% of what you need for that has nothing to do with the type of customer your library is serving. Invest in a common digital infrastructure and focus on the 20% (niches) in which your library can make the difference and thus creates value. Develop online services with the customer in control (in stead of the librarian) and prepare your organization to handle these demand driven processes. Invest in processmanagement with a focus on ‘informationmanagement’ and ‘delivery’ (fulltext, directly or indirectly by delivering publications). These processes add value to the brand ‘ Open up’ and seek help from other organizations by doing this. Learn from their experiences instead of re-inventing the wheel. Stimulate mobility-programs for you personnel, which helps them to create awareness. Start trainee-programs to attract young people. If a library is acting in this way, it has adapted the new marketing rules and way of thinking in it’s organization. For me this means that “The 21st Century Library” is born. The more libraries all over the world do this, the more value they create as libraries in the digital world with abundance of information and Google as the organizer of this information. Perhaps it’s an idea to emphasize this by advertise those libraries as 21st Century Libraries. A term that Obama introduces in his campaign. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Since 2007 Google is the number one brand in the world (Millward Brown BrandZ top 100) Brand is no guarantee. Customers have a variety of choices, they know what there options are as never before and have a lot more to consider than brand. This causes an erosion of loyalty and brandswitching . Today, brand loyalty is virtual and many consumers will choose a brand for pragmatic rather than emotional reasons. What about realiability/trust? Again no guarantee . Over the past decades we have seen traditionally trusted en reliable ‘service brands’, lose consumers’ unqualified trust. Think of what happened to banks recently. Why is branding import than for libraries? This brings me to marketing. [speaker notes by Irmgard Bomers]
  • Op zich is het goed dat Google dit doet – ze maken informatie op goede manier toegankelijk en vergroot daarmee het gebruik. Wel belangrijk dat er goede afspraken worden gemaakt over rechten / garantie duurzaam toegang. Hier kan een bibliotheek aanvullende rol bij spelen. Als Google het niet deed, was het een ander. Technologische ontwikkelingen maken nieuwe vormen van dienstverlening mogelijk. Google gaat daar slim mee om. Daarover klagen heeft geen zin. Bekijk zelf hoe je gebruik kan maken van die nieuwe technologische mogelijkheden. Doe waar je goed in bent op een innovatieve manier Volgens mij ben je meer een bedreiging voor jezelf als je niet meebeweegt met de ontwikkelingen. Als je bang blijft afwachten wat er gaat gebeuren. Probeer mee te gaan in de flow. Maar ga ook niet zonder nadenken “allemaal 2.0-dingen” doen. Luister naar je gebruiker (meet, onderzoek, luister) Analyseer het online gebruik van je diensten bouw daar dynamisch eigentijdse diensten op (kleine stapjes) – aanbod vereenvoudigen kies waar je je op concentreert (businessmodel) zoek de juiste partners en doe alleen waar je goed in bent maak gebruik van de kracht van google [speaker notes: Elco van Staveren]
  • Since 2007 Google is the number one brand in the world (Millward Brown BrandZ top 100) Brand is no guarantee. Customers have a variety of choices, they know what there options are as never before and have a lot more to consider than brand. This causes an erosion of loyalty and brandswitching . Today, brand loyalty is virtual and many consumers will choose a brand for pragmatic rather than emotional reasons. What about realiability/trust? Again no guarantee . Over the past decades we have seen traditionally trusted en reliable ‘service brands’, lose consumers’ unqualified trust. Think of what happened to banks recently. Why is branding import than for libraries? This brings me to marketing. [speaker notes: Irmgard Bomers]
  • Marketing Of Digital Libraries

    1. 1. Marketing of (Digital) Libraries Drs. Elco van Staveren head Online Services User Services Devision, KB December 1, 2009
    2. 3. digitization collections preservation metadata storage IT Commu- nications Third parties Copy- rights MARKETING Digital Library
    3. 4. innovation
    4. 5. These are the keywords for change
    5. 6. Change “ It’s not the strongest of species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change ” Charles Darwin
    6. 7. Question <ul><li>What business are libraries in? </li></ul>
    7. 11. Books? Content / information? Services?
    8. 12. This presentation is about: The history of Information The power of Branding The dynamics of Marketing The challenge to think different
    9. 13. The History of Information
    10. 14. Source: http://www.baekdal.com/articles/Management/market-of-information/ History of the Information market
    11. 16. “ Something, somewhere went terribly wrong”
    12. 17. Marketplace, ca. 1800 Exchange of information
    13. 18. 1800 - The face to face period
    14. 19. 1900 – Read all about it!
    15. 20. 1960 – Hear the latest information LIVE!
    16. 21. 1990 –SEE it!
    17. 22. 1998 – Everyone could get information from everywhere
    18. 23. 2004: YOU decide what to do
    19. 24. 2004: YOU decide what to do
    20. 26. For the first time, everyone could create their own sphere of information without doing ‘technical things'. Information changed from being tools for the professionals, to a tool for everyone to use .
    21. 27. 2007: ME too!
    22. 28. 2009: Everything is social
    23. 29. <ul><li>In the past 210 years we have seen an amazing evolution of information.  </li></ul><ul><li>We could: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Get information from distant places </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get it LIVE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>See it LIVE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Get to decide when to see something, and what to see </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allow us to take part, and comment. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Publish our own information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>...and in 2009... be the information. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 30. The Future
    25. 33. GET READY! Ask yourself: Are you still trying to get journalists to write about your products? Are you still making websites? Is your social networking strategy to ‘get a Facebook Page'? Or... are you making yourself a natural part of people's stream of information?
    26. 34. HOW ?
    27. 35. The Power of Branding
    28. 36. Branding is the consumers’ continuing expression of loyalty to a product, service or company
    29. 37. A brand is about perception Example: OCLC Report on Library Perceptions and Information Resources (www.oclc.org/reports/2005perceptions.htm) What are the strengths of today’s library brand?
    30. 38. Strengths: Reputation (worldwide) Reliability / trust Quality
    31. 39. Weaknesses: Just books Dusty Just a physical place
    32. 42. KB is BIG in the library world
    33. 43. … but a small player on the internet KB is BIG in the library world
    34. 44. When it’s about the information market…
    35. 46. The Dynamics of Marketing
    36. 47. Marketing The interaction between demand and supply with the aim to maximize usage/turnover of services/products.
    37. 48. Q: What is the marketing mix ?
    38. 49. 4 or 7 P’s Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical evidence 4 or 7 C’s Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation (and Competitor) Circumstances
    39. 51. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence 7p’s
    40. 52. Customer in control Interactivity generates traffic Your competitor is one click away Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    41. 53. <ul><li>What is the product of a public library? </li></ul>Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    42. 54. Public Library Amsterdam 2009 Question: what is the proposition of the public libary of Amsterdam? Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    43. 55. OBA as social meeting point? Location for art and culture? Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    44. 56. open stage for art and culture ? Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    45. 57. “ Feel free to play the piano, only when you CAN play” Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    46. 58. Question <ul><li>What is the product of the KB? </li></ul>Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    47. 59. Room for study Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    48. 60. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    49. 61. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence Depot of Dutch Publications 6 million items: 110 kilometer books, newspapers and magazines long term preservation
    50. 62. E-Depot since 2003 - more than thirteen million scientific articles of major international publishers and over 10,000 journal titles Growth of ca. two million articles a year. Altogether ca 10 TB of storage. Current infrastructure and storage 30 TB long term preser- vation Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    51. 63. <ul><li>Again: What is the product of the KB? </li></ul>Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    52. 64. Duality in our mission and products: Supply long term preservation Demand maximum use of the collection Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    53. 65. Long term preservation + access + delivery Digitization allows the back office to centralize at national level Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    54. 66. a local infrastructure that is open to share our services with the rest of the world cross domain Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    55. 67. worldwide connection Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    56. 68. KB information architecture KB webservices User interfaces Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    57. 69. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence 7p’s
    58. 70. Multichanneling: be where your customers are Everything gets an antenna Shop becomes a showroom Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    59. 71. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence Why is the Apple App store a succes? What are the most succesful apps?
    60. 72. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence Application categories App Store source: http://mobilesyrup.com/2009/07/16/pie-chart-of-apples-65000-available-apps/
    61. 73. the hybrid library has the future Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    62. 74. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence 7p’s
    63. 75. “ Free” as a business model Offer choice Charge for (quality) services Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    64. 76. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence 7p’s
    65. 77. 1948 National Library of the Netherlands http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl/?/nl/items/RA01:11456/&p=1&i=6&st=bibliotheek&sc=(bibliotheek)and%20(isPartOf%20any%20%22RA01%22)/ Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    66. 78. 1964 Advertisement Zonnehof (Public Library Amersfoort) http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl/?/nl/items/RA01:6743/&st=bibliotheek&sc=(bibliotheek)and+(isPartOf+any+%22RA01%22) Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    67. 79. 1968 Advertisement Association of Public Libraries http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl/?/nl/items/RA01:8782/&st=bibliotheek&sc=(bibliotheek)and+(isPartOf+any+%22RA01%22) Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    68. 80. 1972 Advertisement Public Library of Amsterdam http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl/?/nl/items/RA01:5578/&p=1&i=3&st=bibliotheek&sc=(bibliotheek)and%20(isPartOf%20any%20%22RA01%22)/&colcount=1&wst=bibliotheek Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    69. 81. 1975 De Openbare Bibliotheek http://www.geheugenvannederland.nl/?/nl/items/RA01:6633/&st=bibliotheek&sc=(bibliotheek)and+(isPartOf+any+%22RA01%22) Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    70. 82. Push instead of pull Create fans Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    71. 83. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    72. 84. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    73. 85. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    74. 86. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    75. 87. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence 7p’s
    76. 88. <ul><li>Create non library functions </li></ul><ul><li>Stimulate / create mobility: </li></ul><ul><li>Exchange program </li></ul><ul><li>(Management) Trainee program </li></ul><ul><li>Change management </li></ul>Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    77. 89. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence 7p’s
    78. 90. Demand driven Focus on logistics / fulfillment Shared services Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    79. 91. Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence 7p’s
    80. 92. Targeting, measuring Return on Investment / Accountability Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical_evidence
    81. 93. 4 or 7 P’s Product Place Price Promotion Personnel Processes Physical evidence 4 or 7 C’s Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation (and Competitor) Circumstances
    82. 94. Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances 7 c ’s
    83. 95. <ul><li>What are the target groups of the KB? </li></ul>Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances
    84. 96. Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances listen to the customer userpanel – rapid prototyping – customer satisfaction survey usablility survey – logfile-analyses – qualitative survey – …
    85. 97. KB Online Services portfolio Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances
    86. 98. KB Online Services portfolio General public Research (academic & professional ) Cultural Interest Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances
    87. 99. KB Search Research Specials My Library University libraries Public libraries Google Delicious Endnote Zotero KB Online Services portfolio and third party services Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances
    88. 100. Listen to the problems of the customer Bron: University of Minnesota Libraries Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances Discover Share Gather Create Framework
    89. 101. What is the behavior of our users ? Annotating Analyzing Reviewing & Rating Writing Describing Bron: University of Minnesota Libraries Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances Collecting Organizing Discover Share Gather Create Serendipitous Finding Collaborative Finding Structured Finding Keeping Current Acquiring Publishing Teaching Data Sharing Rights Framework
    90. 102. Annotating Analyzing Reviewing & Rating Writing Describing Publishing Teaching Data Sharing Rights What tools do they need? Annotation Tools Social Networking Blogs, Wikis, Lists, Chat Text, Stats, Geospatial, Design Analysis Tools Bron: University of Minnesota Libraries Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances Collecting Organizing Discover Share Gather Create Serendipitous Finding Collaborative Finding Structured Finding Keeping Current Acquiring
    91. 103. Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances 7 c ’s
    92. 104. look for friends Find partners within the library se sector… But also outside Concentrate at your own strength finaly one Digital Library KB: long term storage of metadata, digital content and coordination of online delivery process Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances
    93. 105. Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances
    94. 106. Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances
    95. 107. Commodity Channel Cost Communication Consumer Corporation Circumstances
    96. 108. marketing strategy for libraries
    97. 109. question : what should libraries do?
    98. 110. Collaboration Look for added value Focus at your core business Give services to the user Open platforms IT!
    99. 111. digitization collections preservation metadata storage IT Commu- nications Third parties Copy- rights MARKETING Digital Library
    100. 112. Digital Library The organisation (KB)? The Content? The Services?
    101. 113. Digital Library Bring your services to where the users are
    102. 114. KB is BIG in the library world
    103. 115. … but a small player on the internet KB is BIG in the library world
    104. 116. How to act?
    105. 117. Google is entering new markets - A threatment ?
    106. 118. Google Books Google Scholar Google Editions Google is entering new markets - A threatment ?
    107. 119. <ul><li>IS THE KING OF SEARCHING </li></ul><ul><li>How can we use that for the marketing of your library? </li></ul><ul><li>Use Google as a channel </li></ul><ul><li>Use Google for promotion </li></ul><ul><li>Let Google use your products </li></ul><ul><li>- ..? </li></ul>
    108. 120. 1) don’t panic
    109. 121. 2) be yourself
    110. 122. 3) look for friends
    111. 123. 4) listen to the customer
    112. 124. 5) Give your services to the crowd
    113. 125. [email_address] Twitter: elcovs “ Make yourself a natural part of people’s stream of information”

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