Designing for ExperienceFrameworks and Project StoriesDesigning for ExperienceFrameworks and Project StoriesMarc RettigFit...
Marc RettigFit Associateswww.fitassociates.comThese slides are from a talk presented by Marc Rettig of FitAssociates and A...
PART ONEDesigning for experienceExample: Carnegie LibraryPART TWOMore tools and storiesPART ONEDesigning for experienceExa...
What is Design?What is Design?
Why this tea kettle?
Many forces shape its designaestheticsmarketsafetycapacitycostshelfspaceshippingpackagingweightefficiencydisposalmanufactu...
Different situations, different people,……different kettles
Design is a way to create things that fit a particular set of forcesTo accomplish ourwork, we must firstunderstand theforc...
The Design Process in a nutshellUNDERSTANDpeople, context,use, business,technologyATTEMPT TO FITinsights, patterns,framewo...
That’s just about all you needAfter that, it all depends on:the size of the bag of tools you have tobring to bear on each ...
Did I really mean that last point?I’m sometimes accused of being too loose, tooabstract, unable to articulate a scaleable,...
Designing for experienceDesigning for experience
Exercise OneYou have one minute…Design a vase.
Exercise TwoYou have one minute…Design a wayfor people toenjoy flowersin their home.
Designing for experience makes you change the questionsExperience design, or “designfor experience” is a namefor enlarging...
Design for people doing activities in contextTo do a good job of this,we have to understandas much as we canabout the cont...
ExampleCarnegie Libraryof PittsburghA public service,the building that houses it,the systems that enable it,the people tha...
Meet AradhanaAradhana Goelwww.maya.comgoel@maya.com
What will future information-rich environments look like?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
This needs revolution, not evolutionCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
A disjointed feature-centric systemCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
The underlying issueCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Carnegie Library’s goal“. . . a preferred destinationfor knowledge, entertainment,and social interaction”Carnegie Library ...
Tame complexity, don’t eliminate itCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Research
BASIC QUERY“Do you have a map of Pittsburgh?”SUBSTANTIVE QUERY“What’s a good source for literarycriticism about Oliver Twi...
Interviewing, Brainstorming sessionsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Walk a mile in customers’ shoesCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Is the library open or closed?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
How do I start searching for a book?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
I am stupid…I can’t find anythingCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
What do these things mean?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Is this the right place to ask? question?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Why did I repeat my steps…Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
This was quick!Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
This is a pure waste of time!Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Can I save my search?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Library jargon had permeated the spaceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Analysis
Who are the customers?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Define the underlying information architectureCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Use this framework to describe the customer experienceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Use Scenarios reveal breakpointsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Breakpoint patterns reveal systemic issuesCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Bridging the organizers helps eliminate breakpointsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Principles for designing these bridgesCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information EnvironmentThe end of every customer journey should be thebeginning of a new ...
Rapid Prototyping
Design for complete customer experience cycleCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Design recommendationsOverview > Research > Analysis > DesignCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information EnvironmentDesign principles
Rapid prototypes help to explore options quicklyCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Return on Investment (ROI)
Prioritizing the design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
How to spend wiselyCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Project 1: A dynamic information environmentCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Project 2: A consistent online experienceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Project 3: An intuitive catalogueCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Design
Taming complexity with dynamic information environmentCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
What is the hierarchy of information?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Make information blueprints for the space blueprintsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
ask a librarianafterLexicon shifts to user-centered(not system-centered) languageReference desk = Ask a Librarian
ask a librarianafterLexicon shifts to user-centered(not system-centered) languageReference desk = Ask a LibrarianConsisten...
Circulation desk = Customer Services
Content management systemCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Information can be published on demandCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Orient/Direct people to the scope of the experienceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Identify to reinforceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Educate to encourage self-sufficiencyCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Connect to hidden or relevant informationCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Testing
Close the loop by testingCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Identify patterns to reveal strategic issuesCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Next steps…Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
Results so far?
“I am going to hug the librarian. If I could hug thewhole library, I would.”7-year old Monica Salime of BeaverCarnegie Lib...
Results so far?
Let’stake abreak
Part two:“Design for experience” tools
Our tools so far• Rich persona, documenting thevariety of journeys people haveacross many systems andinteractions• Annotat...
Tools for integrating understandingof many dimensions of experienceVasSol CANVASAlignment wallTask annotation sheetsIntera...
GoalCreate a commercially viable productbased on a government-approvedscience & engineering prototypeProblems• Scientifica...
Task complexity, shown in the working prototypeA screen from theworking productprototype, beforeredesign.
Technology + human anatomyA screen from theworking productprototype, beforeredesign.
The “alignment wall”
sequence of activitiesnotes about each tasktasksactions / steps /views or screensadditional functionality(unnecessary!)
Task sheetsFor each step of each task,we captured:required informationrequired knowledge or skillspeople, relationshipsmea...
Working to understand interaction between rolesMRI TechnicianRadiologistSurgeonXXXXX
MRI Technicianscanimageswork withpatientcreate3DidentifyvesselsspecifycutsmeasureflowverifyqualityWorking to understand in...
Activities, people, tools
Critical task in more detail
“Sticky-storming” the first mockup of the new design
Tools for integrating understandingof many dimensions of experienceAppliancemanufacturerBucket-analysis spreadsheetLearnin...
Bucket-analysis spreadsheetResearchparticipants“Buckets:” categories of interest, themes, actions,…Field data:quotes, obse...
Zooming in…
The value of the bucket-analysis spreadsheetYes, it takes time to populate. But then:Reading up and down columns quickly t...
UNDERSTANDINGTIME →comfortmisunderstandingOne result: behavioral segments based on learning patternsmastery, virtuosityIns...
Meaningful dimensions of differenceFor my money,a set of thesethat showsvariation inpeople’sbehavior acrossan observed set...
Tools for integrating understanding ofmany dimensions of experiencegoArmy.comguiding strategyDecision-making timelinesData...
Personal story, mapped from audio tapeA Soldier’s story, transcribed from an audio tape of aninterview. Timeline views are...
Timeline / collage from story elicitationA kit of parts wasinvaluable in elicitingthe story of Soldier’sdecision, includin...
From another project: timelines synthesized into genres of experienceAnne Conners and Kord Brashear, Institute of Design, ...
Making data manipulable (and public)During analysis (here, affinityclustering and a few differentattempts at models) wesur...
Immersing extended team in the dataThis work session exposed theextended team and stakeholders toartifacts from the resear...
A little dramatic readingTo give everyone a sense of what itis like to be a teenager facing a lifedecision, and considerin...
Scores and scores of (mostly bad) ideasWe then had people brainstorm: “Inlight of the themes emerging from thedata, how wo...
Systematic, practical, detailedOverview pageStrategic DirectiveSuccess CriteriaOpportunitiesDetail pageSuccess CriterionOp...
Story about possible future, as catalyst – a “Vision prototype!”A visionprototype,technicallyconservativebutorganizational...
The team translates the researchInsights from the research begin to shape the nextiteration of the site.
BBC Digital Curriculum: Posters of design guidelinesAn attempt to make design principles from research a part of the daily...
SummaryDesigning for experience is hardMy recommended recipe:• a simple, powerful, generallyapplicable process• a big bag ...
Thank you
Rettiggoel.ux week.8.25.05
Rettiggoel.ux week.8.25.05
Rettiggoel.ux week.8.25.05
Rettiggoel.ux week.8.25.05
Rettiggoel.ux week.8.25.05
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Rettiggoel.ux week.8.25.05

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A shared presentation by Marc Rettig of Fit Associates and Aradhana Goel, then of Maya Design and now at IDEO. Provides great case studies, frameworks, tools and examples from work in designing for people's experience. Case stories include the Carnegie Library in Pittsburgh (Aradhana) and Vassol's CANVAS (now called NOVA) product for measuring blood flow in the brain.

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Rettiggoel.ux week.8.25.05

  1. 1. Designing for ExperienceFrameworks and Project StoriesDesigning for ExperienceFrameworks and Project StoriesMarc RettigFit AssociatesAradhana GoelMAYA DesignMarc RettigFit AssociatesAradhana GoelMAYA Design
  2. 2. Marc RettigFit Associateswww.fitassociates.comThese slides are from a talk presented by Marc Rettig of FitAssociates and Aradhana Goel of MAYA Design, at AdaptivePath’s User Experience Week 2005 in Washington, D.C.This PDF contains two sets of slides combined into one, in theorder in which they were presented in D.C. The slides withthe colored bars at top and bottom are from Marc. The slideswith the black bars at top and bottom are from Aradhana.Questions and comments?Marc Rettig: marc@fitassociates.comAradhana Goel: goel@maya.comSlides and contents are © 2005, Marc Rettig and Aradhana Goel
  3. 3. PART ONEDesigning for experienceExample: Carnegie LibraryPART TWOMore tools and storiesPART ONEDesigning for experienceExample: Carnegie LibraryPART TWOMore tools and stories17 - 86pages 4 - 1688 - 125
  4. 4. What is Design?What is Design?
  5. 5. Why this tea kettle?
  6. 6. Many forces shape its designaestheticsmarketsafetycapacitycostshelfspaceshippingpackagingweightefficiencydisposalmanufacturing
  7. 7. Different situations, different people,……different kettles
  8. 8. Design is a way to create things that fit a particular set of forcesTo accomplish ourwork, we must firstunderstand theforces as best wecan, then beginattempts to makesomething that fitsthe shape theysuggest. A goodprocess helpsteams manage thisdifficult work: refineunderstanding,attempt to fit withintheir pressures.
  9. 9. The Design Process in a nutshellUNDERSTANDpeople, context,use, business,technologyATTEMPT TO FITinsights, patterns,frameworks,guidelinesstories,mockups,prototypes,product
  10. 10. That’s just about all you needAfter that, it all depends on:the size of the bag of tools you have tobring to bear on each bubbleyour wisdom in choosing the right toolfor the job at handyour success at facilitating a group ofpeople through the process, andnurturing a culture of design forexperienceATTEMPT TO FITUNDERSTAND
  11. 11. Did I really mean that last point?I’m sometimes accused of being too loose, tooabstract, unable to articulate a scaleable,enterprise-worthy process.I do of course work with fine-grained steps in aproject plan.But I believe a lot of the effort spent teaching andcajoling teams to follow a process would be moreproductively put into:a) giving them practice at the two-bubble process inlots of situationsb) helping people expand their bag of tools andmethodsc) helping teams become great at facilitatingcollaborative workATTEMPT TO FITUNDERSTAND
  12. 12. Designing for experienceDesigning for experience
  13. 13. Exercise OneYou have one minute…Design a vase.
  14. 14. Exercise TwoYou have one minute…Design a wayfor people toenjoy flowersin their home.
  15. 15. Designing for experience makes you change the questionsExperience design, or “designfor experience” is a namefor enlarging scope to considerpatterns of life, goals, activity,context, repeated use,learning, sharing, emotion, andmore… while applyingThe Design Process.ATTEMPT TO FITUNDERSTAND
  16. 16. Design for people doing activities in contextTo do a good job of this,we have to understandas much as we canabout the context, theactivity, what else isgoing on, wherepeople’s attention isfocused, what happensbefore and after, whattheir goals are, andmore.
  17. 17. ExampleCarnegie Libraryof PittsburghA public service,the building that houses it,the systems that enable it,the people that deliver it
  18. 18. Meet AradhanaAradhana Goelwww.maya.comgoel@maya.com
  19. 19. What will future information-rich environments look like?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  20. 20. This needs revolution, not evolutionCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  21. 21. A disjointed feature-centric systemCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  22. 22. The underlying issueCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  23. 23. Carnegie Library’s goal“. . . a preferred destinationfor knowledge, entertainment,and social interaction”Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  24. 24. Tame complexity, don’t eliminate itCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  25. 25. Research
  26. 26. BASIC QUERY“Do you have a map of Pittsburgh?”SUBSTANTIVE QUERY“What’s a good source for literarycriticism about Oliver Twist?”BASIC WAYFINDING QUERY“Where are the restrooms?”TARGETED WAYFINDING QUERY“Where can I find this book?”Exploring, Shadowing, DocumentingCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  27. 27. Interviewing, Brainstorming sessionsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  28. 28. Walk a mile in customers’ shoesCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  29. 29. Is the library open or closed?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  30. 30. How do I start searching for a book?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  31. 31. I am stupid…I can’t find anythingCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  32. 32. What do these things mean?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  33. 33. Is this the right place to ask? question?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  34. 34. Why did I repeat my steps…Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  35. 35. This was quick!Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  36. 36. This is a pure waste of time!Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  37. 37. Can I save my search?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  38. 38. Library jargon had permeated the spaceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  39. 39. Analysis
  40. 40. Who are the customers?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  41. 41. Define the underlying information architectureCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  42. 42. Use this framework to describe the customer experienceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  43. 43. Use Scenarios reveal breakpointsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  44. 44. Breakpoint patterns reveal systemic issuesCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  45. 45. Bridging the organizers helps eliminate breakpointsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  46. 46. Principles for designing these bridgesCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  47. 47. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information EnvironmentThe end of every customer journey should be thebeginning of a new one…
  48. 48. Rapid Prototyping
  49. 49. Design for complete customer experience cycleCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  50. 50. Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  51. 51. Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  52. 52. Design recommendationsOverview > Research > Analysis > DesignCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  53. 53. Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  54. 54. Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  55. 55. Design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  56. 56. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information EnvironmentDesign principles
  57. 57. Rapid prototypes help to explore options quicklyCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  58. 58. Return on Investment (ROI)
  59. 59. Prioritizing the design recommendationsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  60. 60. How to spend wiselyCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  61. 61. Project 1: A dynamic information environmentCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  62. 62. Project 2: A consistent online experienceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  63. 63. Project 3: An intuitive catalogueCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  64. 64. Design
  65. 65. Taming complexity with dynamic information environmentCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  66. 66. What is the hierarchy of information?Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  67. 67. Make information blueprints for the space blueprintsCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  68. 68. ask a librarianafterLexicon shifts to user-centered(not system-centered) languageReference desk = Ask a Librarian
  69. 69. ask a librarianafterLexicon shifts to user-centered(not system-centered) languageReference desk = Ask a LibrarianConsistent across “userinterfaces” fromwebsite to physicalsite…
  70. 70. Circulation desk = Customer Services
  71. 71. Content management systemCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  72. 72. Information can be published on demandCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  73. 73. Orient/Direct people to the scope of the experienceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  74. 74. Identify to reinforceCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  75. 75. Educate to encourage self-sufficiencyCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  76. 76. Connect to hidden or relevant informationCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  77. 77. Testing
  78. 78. Close the loop by testingCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  79. 79. Identify patterns to reveal strategic issuesCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  80. 80. Next steps…Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  81. 81. Results so far?
  82. 82. “I am going to hug the librarian. If I could hug thewhole library, I would.”7-year old Monica Salime of BeaverCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh | Information Environment
  83. 83. Results so far?
  84. 84. Let’stake abreak
  85. 85. Part two:“Design for experience” tools
  86. 86. Our tools so far• Rich persona, documenting thevariety of journeys people haveacross many systems andinteractions• Annotated point-of-viewphotographs• Breakpoint analysis• Models that map informationneeds to a model of people’sexperienceThanks, Aradhana!
  87. 87. Tools for integrating understandingof many dimensions of experienceVasSol CANVASAlignment wallTask annotation sheetsInteractions between rolesSticky stormA detailed description of this project waspresented at DUX 2003. It can be downloaded atwww.marcrettig.com/writings/DUX_Herzfeldt_Rettig.pdf
  88. 88. GoalCreate a commercially viable productbased on a government-approvedscience & engineering prototypeProblems• Scientifically amazing but unusableprototype• No design awareness, pure techculture• Ease of learning and error-free usewere critical to the business modelCANVASmeasuresblood flowwithout invasiveprocedures.VasSol CANVAS
  89. 89. Task complexity, shown in the working prototypeA screen from theworking productprototype, beforeredesign.
  90. 90. Technology + human anatomyA screen from theworking productprototype, beforeredesign.
  91. 91. The “alignment wall”
  92. 92. sequence of activitiesnotes about each tasktasksactions / steps /views or screensadditional functionality(unnecessary!)
  93. 93. Task sheetsFor each step of each task,we captured:required informationrequired knowledge or skillspeople, relationshipsmeasures of successbarriers to successterminologymental taskunderlying concerns
  94. 94. Working to understand interaction between rolesMRI TechnicianRadiologistSurgeonXXXXX
  95. 95. MRI Technicianscanimageswork withpatientcreate3DidentifyvesselsspecifycutsmeasureflowverifyqualityWorking to understand interaction between rolesRadiologistresolveproblemsreview &approvemakediagnosisSurgeonconsultstudy
  96. 96. Activities, people, tools
  97. 97. Critical task in more detail
  98. 98. “Sticky-storming” the first mockup of the new design
  99. 99. Tools for integrating understandingof many dimensions of experienceAppliancemanufacturerBucket-analysis spreadsheetLearning modelPersona based on “dimensions ofsignificant difference”
  100. 100. Bucket-analysis spreadsheetResearchparticipants“Buckets:” categories of interest, themes, actions,…Field data:quotes, observations, actions
  101. 101. Zooming in…
  102. 102. The value of the bucket-analysis spreadsheetYes, it takes time to populate. But then:Reading up and down columns quickly tellsyou everyone’s story for a particular slice ofthe data.Arranging columns together makes it easyto synthesize several categories as youread.Reading across a row tells you a singleperson’s whole story.Arranging rows together helps you seecommonalities and differences.Tip: make a blank one of these prior to aprototype test, have observers capturedirectly into it.
  103. 103. UNDERSTANDINGTIME →comfortmisunderstandingOne result: behavioral segments based on learning patternsmastery, virtuosityInsight: successfulrecovery frommistakes is relatedto growing masteryof the applianceand its controls.
  104. 104. Meaningful dimensions of differenceFor my money,a set of thesethat showsvariation inpeople’sbehavior acrossan observed setof dimensions isfar more usefulto the teamthan a set ofnarrative“persona.”
  105. 105. Tools for integrating understanding ofmany dimensions of experiencegoArmy.comguiding strategyDecision-making timelinesData among the cubiclesImmersion workshops
  106. 106. Personal story, mapped from audio tapeA Soldier’s story, transcribed from an audio tape of aninterview. Timeline views are great for integrating manylayers of experience into a single view.
  107. 107. Timeline / collage from story elicitationA kit of parts wasinvaluable in elicitingthe story of Soldier’sdecision, includinginfluences, resources,events and emotions.
  108. 108. From another project: timelines synthesized into genres of experienceAnne Conners and Kord Brashear, Institute of Design, IIT, 2000
  109. 109. Making data manipulable (and public)During analysis (here, affinityclustering and a few differentattempts at models) wesurrounded the team’s cubiclearea with data from teenagers,mothers, recruiters and soldiers.This has the side effect ofbeginning to expose everyone tothe voice of the people who usethe site.
  110. 110. Immersing extended team in the dataThis work session exposed theextended team and stakeholders toartifacts from the research, as wellas the themes that had begun toemerge. Quotes, photographs,letters home, military documents,and more lined the walls.
  111. 111. A little dramatic readingTo give everyone a sense of what itis like to be a teenager facing a lifedecision, and considering the Armyas one choice, we read quotes fromour research participants to thisgathering of the extended teamand stakeholders.
  112. 112. Scores and scores of (mostly bad) ideasWe then had people brainstorm: “Inlight of the themes emerging from thedata, how would you do your workdifferently?” The point was not somuch to generate the shape of theweb site, it was to get this group ofpeople thinking differently about theirwork, in light of new understandingabout people who use it.
  113. 113. Systematic, practical, detailedOverview pageStrategic DirectiveSuccess CriteriaOpportunitiesDetail pageSuccess CriterionOpportunityInsight from projectSupporting quotesand data
  114. 114. Story about possible future, as catalyst – a “Vision prototype!”A visionprototype,technicallyconservativebutorganizationallyambitious,showed what itmight be like inthree years if allthe strategicdirections werepursued.
  115. 115. The team translates the researchInsights from the research begin to shape the nextiteration of the site.
  116. 116. BBC Digital Curriculum: Posters of design guidelinesAn attempt to make design principles from research a part of the daily work culture.
  117. 117. SummaryDesigning for experience is hardMy recommended recipe:• a simple, powerful, generallyapplicable process• a big bag of methods and tools• use the right tool for the rightgoal• attend to the gaps, bridges,connections, relationships first,then get the artifacts andinterfaces right• work hard at facilitatingcollaboration
  118. 118. Thank you

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